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    Suspended GM Enginner Talks With Congressional Investigators


    • The engineer at the center of the ignition switch mess talks with investigators

    Ray DeGiorgio, the General Motors engineer who was called out during the GM ignition switch hearing and subsequently suspended, spoke with congressional investigators earlier this month.

    The New York Times reports that DeGiorgio talked with investigators for ten hours on May 19th about his involvement in the ignition switch recall. As you might recall, DeGiorgio was the engineer who signed off on a change to the ignition switch in certain GM vehicles. However during testimony in a wrongful death suit, DeGiorgio claimed he didn't remember authorizing any change to the ignition switch.

    During his questioning with investigators, DeGiorgio appeared “genuinely upset” according to a house aide.

    “He came across as if he was just overburdened and just missed it,” said the aide.

    DeGiorgio said that he forgot that he signed off on the change for the ignition switch because it was a part of of a package of changes, and that seven years had passed from the time he signed off to testifying. DeGiorgio also didn't give any information that indicated that GM CEO Mary Barra knew about this problem before she took on her new role earlier this year.

    Source: New York Times

    William Maley is a staff writer for Cheers & Gears. He can be reached at william.maley@cheersandgears.com or you can follow him on twitter at @realmudmonster.

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    I can actually believe this as even in my line of work, I see mgr.'s who are always pushed with a ton of reviews and they look to the biggest issues and if no time left gloss over small things.

    As such, I can see a big list of changes and the ignition switch being a small item that would be signed off on without much though or review.

    Before anyone jumps on me, this does not justify the 13 deaths contributed to the faulty ignition switch.

    The people who should be grilled are the accountants and lawyers who justified that leaving it versus paying to replace them all was the best course of action.

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    I can barely remember what I authorized 3 months ago much less 7 years ago.... my boss is even worse at this.

    Ditto. I have forgotten entire classes I took back in school.

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