Jump to content
  • William Maley
    William Maley

    New Audit Shows NHTSA Failed To Implement A Number of Recommendations

    Sign in to follow this  

      A new audit into NHTSA shows they haven't implement many of the recommendations that were given to it back in 2011.

    Back in 2011, the U.S. Transportation Department's Office of Inspector General (OIG) performed an audit into the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) after its handling of the Toyota unintended acceleration crisis. The OIG made ten recommendations on how NHTSA identifies and addresses safety defects such as developing a formal training program and documenting explanations as to why they have missed deadlines. Five years on, NHTSA hasn't put all of those recommendations into practice.

     

    According to Reuters, the OIG released a new audit showing the agency had not implemented all of the recommendations agreed upon in 2011 to help protect drivers. Out of the ten recommendations, NHTSA has only put three into practice.

     

    The audit showed that NHTSA had not implemented any sort of training for their employees to investigate possible defects.

     

    "As a result, (NHTSA's defects investigation) staff may not be sufficiently trained to identify and investigate potential vehicle defects, or ensure that vehicle manufacturers take prompt and effective action," the OIG states in the audit.

     

    The OIG also found NHTSA didn't document reasons as to why they delayed completing investigations in a timely fashion, along with retaining safety records.

     

    NHTSA spokesman Gordon Trowbridge tells Reuters the agency agrees with the recommendations and will apply all of them by June 30th.

     

    Source: Reuters, Office of Inspector General

    Sign in to follow this  


    User Feedback

    Recommended Comments

    WOW, Wonder who is responsible for making this happen and are they still employed or have they been fired for lack of doing their job?

     

    NHTSA = Not Here To Supply Action

     

    NHTSA = Nobody Home Take Salary Away

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites

    I completely agree that there is something amiss at the NHTSA.  I've been tracking an issue with GM trucks for a while, but because the reports are spread over many different models, the issue appears to be minor if just looking at one model.   Basically, if you look up issues with a GMC Yukon, you may see 15 to 20 notes on it and when taken in the context of how many they built, it doesn't look like much.  But when you expand it to all of vehicles built in that generation of platform, Yukon, Yukon XL, Tahoe, Suburban, Silverado 1500, Silverado HD, Sierra 1500, Sierra HD, Avalanche, Escalade, Escalade EXT, Escalade ESV... etc etc..... then you come up with a number at least several hundred if not over 1,000.  And it's a part that all of those trucks share.  

     

    However, since there doesn't appear to be a way to link similar vehicles that differ mostly in badging, there is no way to get a clear picture. I had to manually count the entries in the database. 

     

    I have already contacted GM about the issue and they say they've done testing and that no recall will be pending because they do not believe there is a safety issue.  That is the extent of their comment.

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites


    Join the conversation

    You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
    Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

    Guest
    Add a comment...

    ×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

      Only 75 emoji are allowed.

    ×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

    ×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

    ×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.




  • Similar Content

    • By Drew Dowdell
      The JL Generation of the Jeep Wrangler may have improper frame welds according to an investigation by the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA).  The investigation started after a Wrangler owner complained about a frame that had been improperly welded at the factory. As a result of that improper weld, the owner found a number of other problems stemming from the original issue. 
      While no findings have been released, there is enough evidence for the NHTSA to warrant further investigation and the agency has asked FCA for more information regarding the issue.  The NHTSA seemed to think that FCA's explanation "did not adequately address whether the frame weld quality deficiencies compromise the structure integrity of the vehicles, and therefor may pose an unreasonable risk to motor vehicle safety."
      The investigation further aims to determine if the earlier reported 'death wobble' is related to the frame welding issues. FCA issued a fix for the 'death wobble' last month, but did not turn it into a full recall. Jeep will install a new steering damper, free of charge, to anyone who wishes to have the work completed. 

      View full article
    • By Drew Dowdell
      The JL Generation of the Jeep Wrangler may have improper frame welds according to an investigation by the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA).  The investigation started after a Wrangler owner complained about a frame that had been improperly welded at the factory. As a result of that improper weld, the owner found a number of other problems stemming from the original issue. 
      While no findings have been released, there is enough evidence for the NHTSA to warrant further investigation and the agency has asked FCA for more information regarding the issue.  The NHTSA seemed to think that FCA's explanation "did not adequately address whether the frame weld quality deficiencies compromise the structure integrity of the vehicles, and therefor may pose an unreasonable risk to motor vehicle safety."
      The investigation further aims to determine if the earlier reported 'death wobble' is related to the frame welding issues. FCA issued a fix for the 'death wobble' last month, but did not turn it into a full recall. Jeep will install a new steering damper, free of charge, to anyone who wishes to have the work completed. 
    • By Drew Dowdell
      The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration has begun testing vehicles that have cameras in place of real mirrors.  The request to test such devices goes back to March of 2014 when the Alliance of Automobile Manufacturers along with Tesla filed a petition with the NHTSA to get approval to install based rear or side vision cameras and screens  in their vehicles.  Daimler filed a similar petition in 2015 for their heavy duty trucks. Japan and Europe have already approved the technology. 
      The first car with cameras replacing the side mirrors was the Lexus ES sold in Japan, followed by the Audi e-tron in Europe back in December.  Both vehicles are sold in the U.S. with standard mirrors instead of the cameras.  Honda's coming Honda e will have the technology standard when it goes on sale in Europe later this year.
      Mirrorless systems are an area where the legislation has not yet caught up with the technology according to Mark Dahncke of Audi.

      View full article
    • By Drew Dowdell
      The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration has begun testing vehicles that have cameras in place of real mirrors.  The request to test such devices goes back to March of 2014 when the Alliance of Automobile Manufacturers along with Tesla filed a petition with the NHTSA to get approval to install based rear or side vision cameras and screens  in their vehicles.  Daimler filed a similar petition in 2015 for their heavy duty trucks. Japan and Europe have already approved the technology. 
      The first car with cameras replacing the side mirrors was the Lexus ES sold in Japan, followed by the Audi e-tron in Europe back in December.  Both vehicles are sold in the U.S. with standard mirrors instead of the cameras.  Honda's coming Honda e will have the technology standard when it goes on sale in Europe later this year.
      Mirrorless systems are an area where the legislation has not yet caught up with the technology according to Mark Dahncke of Audi.
    • By Drew Dowdell
      Back in 2017, the NHTSA released a report on the safety of Tesla's Autopilot system after the fatal crash of a Tesla owner in 2016. That report claimed that the use of Autopilot, or more precisely the lane-keeping function called Autosteer, reduced crash rates by 40%. 
      In that original crash, the owner repeatedly ignored warnings to resume manual control of the vehicle.  Critics questioned whether Autopilot was encouraging drivers to pay less attention to the road.  The NHTSA report appeared to put those concerns to rest.
      Later, when a second driver died in an Autopilot related accident, Tesla CEO Elon Musk pointed to the NHTSA study and the 40% increase in safety claim. Now, 2 years after the original report. According to a report by Arstechnica, a third party has analyzed the data and found the 40% claim to be bogus.
      Originally the NHTSA data on Autopilot crashes was not publically available when Quality Control Systems, a research and consulting firm, requested it under a Freedom of Information Act request. The NHTSA claimed the data from Tesla was confidential and would cause the company harm if released.  QCS sued the NHTSA and in September of last year, a federal judge granted the FOI request.
      What QCS found was that missing data and poor math caused the NHTSA report to be grossly inaccurate.  The period in question covered vehicle both before and after Autopilot was installed, however, a significant number of the vehicles in the data set provided by Telsa have large gaps between the last recorded mileage before Autopilot was installed and the first recorded mileage after installation.  The result is a gray area where it is unknown if Autopilot was active or not.  In spite of this deficiency, the NHTSA used the data anyway.
      In the data provided only 5,714 vehicles have no gap between the pre and post Autopilot mileage readings.  When QCS ran calculations again, they found that crashes per mile actually increased 59% after Autopilot was installed.
      Does that mean that a Tesla using Autopilot makes a crash 59% more likely?  The answer to that is no for a number of reasons.  First is that the sample size QCS had to work with is a very small percentage of Tesla’s total sales.  Secondly, the data is only representative of vehicles with version 1 of Tesla’s Autopilot, a version that Tesla hasn’t sold since 2016.
      Tesla stopped quoting the NHTSA report around May of 2018, possibly realizing something was fishy with the data. They have since taken to their own report stating that cars with Autopilot engaged have fewer accidents per mile than cars without it engaged.  This has some statistical fishiness to it as well.  Autopilot is only meant to be engaged on the highway and due to the higher rate of speed all vehicles have a lower rate of accidents per mile.
      We may just have to wait until more data is available to find out if Tesla Autopilot and systems similar to it make crashed that much less likely.

      View full article
  • Posts

  • Social Stream

  • Today's Birthdays

    1. # 1 chevy fan
      # 1 chevy fan
      (39 years old)
    2. Forked69
      Forked69
      (55 years old)
    3. mark-petz.com
      mark-petz.com
      (39 years old)
  • Who's Online (See full list)

  • My Clubs

About us

CheersandGears.com - Founded 2001

We ♥ Cars

Get in touch

Follow us

Recent tweets

facebook

×
×
  • Create New...