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    New Survey Shows Many Consumers Aren't Happy With Infotainment Systems


    • From the Not Surprising Department On Infotainment Systems

    What is the big problem with new cars? According to a new survey, it happens to be the infotainment systems.

     

    A study done by automotive consultants SBD and polling firm Nielsen asked some 14,000 owners about features in their cars and asked which ones were the best and the worst. The ten that scored the lowest in the survey were all related in some form to the infotainment system. These included smart phone integration, built-in apps, customizable instrument panels, and voice recognition.

     

    “It’s sort of an arms race -- who can have the most technology in the vehicle -- and consumers are confused,” said Nielsen Vice President Mike Chadsey at a connected-car symposium yesterday.

     

    The study also showed that 43 percent of participants said automakers are adding too much infotainment tech.

     

    So why are automakers adding all of this tech? Andrew Hart, director of SBD explained that automakers add all sorts of tech to draw in customers and to help boost revenue. But this might backfire as owners might go to another brand because of how bad the infotainment system was.

     

    If you to improve the chances of owner sticking with your brand, just get the infotainment right, getting the right set of features that people actually want to use and making them easy to use,” said Hart.

     

    Source: Automotive News (Subscription Required)

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    I am the only one on the planet to not give a damn about infotainment systems?

    Am I the only one on the planet that wishes there was NO infotainment systems at all?

     

    Just a good 'ol working radio and a USB port so I could use my USB key for my music is all that I require for "high tech"....

     

    I dont give a damn about LCD screens...Ive got my eyes looking out the bloody window that tells me where I am going...

     

    I already know where the closest gas station is to my home...or McDonald's...and if Im visiting a new city...here is my secret...I would prefer to explore the new city by myself and discover the city that way...oh boy...what a concept that is!!!!!

     

    Alls I need is a 2 dollar map...no wait...Ive got internet at home...why dont I just google this shyte at home with Google Earth Street View and google what I nned to see in this city I am about to visit...and print that shyte and take it with me...oh...that would be too much trouble...

    I guess families also like the idea to be connected on the interwebs to keep their kids quiet...I guess..."are we there yet" is too much for them to handle...

    But...when the kids' eyes are glued watching Shrek or Frozen for the millionth time...the kids dont see what kind of scenery they are missing...its true its true...they could always use Google Earth Street View to see where their daddy was driving on their family vacation...

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    I am the only one on the planet to not give a damn about infotainment systems?

     

    Nope!  I don't, either.

     

    I've voiced before that I find it ironic that government(s) have cracked down on cell phone usage while driving ... yet, these infotainment systems are, in many cases, MORE distracting.

     

    But, what do I know?

     

     

    Cort :) www.oldcarsstronghearts.com

    1979 & 1989 Caprice Classics | pigValve, paceMaker, cowValve
    "It's coming down to nothing more than apathy" __ The Fray __ 'Over My Head'
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    This is why CarPlay compatibility will be good for the entertainment and phone. Climate should hVe redundant physical buttons. Radios should have volume seek And scan bass treble and fade physical buttons.

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    I am the only one on the planet to not give a damn about infotainment systems?

     

    Nope!  I don't, either.

     

    I've voiced before that I find it ironic that government(s) have cracked down on cell phone usage while driving ... yet, these infotainment systems are, in many cases, MORE distracting.

     

    But, what do I know?

     

     

    Cort :) www.oldcarsstronghearts.com

    1979 & 1989 Caprice Classics | pigValve, paceMaker, cowValve
    "It's coming down to nothing more than apathy" __ The Fray __ 'Over My Head'

     

    Many people have voiced this about infotainment systems being more distracting than cell phones...

    I have a feeling the government is letting that go...because

     

    WARNING...CONSPIRACY ALERT

     

    because I think the world's leaders are secretly pushing for autonomous vehicles...so they are letting the automakers perfect the infotainment systems with all the safety nannies such as lane departure systems...and all that goes into infotainment systems because eventually...humans wont be driving...computers will be.

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    From a usability perspective, I don't see much improvement in usability in car audio interfaces from 15 years ago...my two 15 yr old cars have simple set ups that work just fine--cassette (don't that any more), single or multiple CD player, easy to use knobs and buttons, redundant steering wheel controls for volume, station, mode..no touch screens, only extras I'd like would be an AUX jack or USB connection..

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    Many people have voiced this about infotainment systems being more distracting than cell phones...

     

    I have a feeling the government is letting that go...because

     

    WARNING...CONSPIRACY ALERT

     

    because I think the world's leaders are secretly pushing for autonomous vehicles...so they are letting the automakers perfect the infotainment systems with all the safety nannies such as lane departure systems...and all that goes into infotainment systems because eventually...humans wont be driving...computers will be.

     

     

    You might be right.  That is very scary, at least, to me, on multiple levels.....

     

     

    Cort :) www.oldcarsstronghearts.com

    1979 & 1989 Caprice Classics | pigValve, paceMaker, cowValve
    "I'm sick & tired of being politically correct" __ John Mellencamp __ 'Peaceful World'
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      Collision avoidance technologies—such as blind spot warning and detection, lane-keeping/centering and back-up camera/warning systems—are collectively part of the collision protection category, which has the highest overall satisfaction among the five groups of technologies included in the study index scores, with a score of 754 on a 1,000-point scale. In contrast, owners are least satisfied with their navigation systems (687).
      “For any technology in a vehicle, it’s critical that the owners want it, are aware they have it and know how to use it,” said Kristin Kolodge, executive director of driver interaction & HMI research at J.D. Power. “It is alarming how many technologies consumers have in their vehicle but aren’t using because they don’t know they have them or don’t know how to use them. Both of these knowledge gaps have long-term implications for future demand.”
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      The Role of the Dealer
      Even if owners are aware they have an in-vehicle technology doesn’t mean they will use it.
      Among owners who say they never use a specific technology, 39% indicate they bring another device into their vehicle to replace certain technologies that are already present. Of those who bring in another device, navigation is the feature most often replaced. Furthermore, 57% of owners who bring in another device say they never used the in-vehicle equipment before bringing this outside device into the car to replace the vehicle’s features. Of the 43% who have used it, 56% stop using it within the first month.  
      “The dealer plays a critical role in whether or not a technology is used,” said Kolodge. “When the dealer takes the time to explain the technology or provide a demonstration, it not only makes the owner aware they have the technology, but also helps them understand how to use it, which means they are more likely to use it, continue to use it and, because they see the value, want it in their next vehicle.”
      Among owners who learn how to operate the technologies from their dealer, overall satisfaction is 25-54 points higher, compared with those who learn how to operate the technologies from another source or from prior experience. Technologies that owners say are difficult to use (DTU) put a strain on satisfaction.  Across all technologies, there is an average 98-point drop in satisfaction when owners have DTU issues.
      DTU problems not only deteriorate satisfaction, but they also affect the vehicle’s quality. Even though it may operate as intended, when a technology is difficult for an owner to use or understand, it is likely to be considered a quality issue. For example, navigation system difficult to use/poor location is the sixth most common problem in the J.D. Power 2016 U.S. Initial Quality StudySM (IQS). Owners who learn how to use their navigation system from the dealer report 2.0 problems per 100 vehicles (PP100) fewer navigation DTU problems than those who do not get a dealer explanation.
      “By taking the time to show the technology to the new owner, the dealer can mitigate DTU issues, improving both satisfaction and quality,” said Kolodge. “The navigation system is just one area. If the dealer explains all or many of the technologies to the new owner, it can have a dramatic positive effect on the ownership experience.” 
      Gap between Premium and Non-Premium Is Narrow 
      Overall owner satisfaction with new-vehicle technology averages 730. Satisfaction among premium vehicle owners is slightly higher at 734, compared with 730 among non-premium owners.
      Overall satisfaction varies greatly by segment. Satisfaction is highest in the large segment (755), followed by the small premium segment (735); compact premium segment (732); midsize premium segment (731); compact segment (727); midsize segment (725); and the small segment (706).
      “It’s not just how much technology you have in the vehicle, but how well it’s delivered,” said Kolodge. “The technology’s usability and how well it is integrated into the vehicle are critical—that has to be done right.”
      The 2016 U.S. Tech Experience Index (TXI) Study is based on a survey of 17,864 vehicle owners and lessees. Awards are based solely on responses from the 13,269 consumers who purchased or leased a new 2016 model-year vehicle in the previous 90 days that has been considered an all-new or redesigned vehicle within in the past three years. The study was fielded from February through August 2016.

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