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    Truck Manufacturers Argue Over The SAE Towing Test


    By William Maley

    Staff Writer - CheersandGears.com

    April 10, 2013

    Ford, General Motors, and Ram are continuing their stance on ignoring the SAE testing procedure for towing ratings according to Automotive News.

    The procedure, named J2807, is designed to reflect how the pickups are really used, and are supposed to be more accurate than the non-SAE numbers, which manufacturers supply. The procedure tests a pickup’s structure, propulsion, handling, braking, and thermal-handling ability, in a set environment. This procedure also has the truck equipped and not equipped with a load.

    All of the truck manufacturers agreed to start this procedure in 2013. Only one manufacturer has actually gone ahead and implemented the procedure; Toyota.

    Toyota isn't pleased their the only brand who is doing this and has called on the other manufacturers to “do the right thing.”

    The big three isn't budging. General Motors says they won't implement the procedure until Ford does it. Ram is in the same boat as GM. Ford says they thought the procedure only applies to new models starting this year. They went onto say that the new F-150, due out in 2015, would use this procedure.

    Source: Automotive News (Subscription Required)

    William Maley is a staff writer for Cheers & Gears. He can be reached at william.maley@cheersandgears.com or you can follow him on twitter at @realmudmonster.

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    Would be great to have a comparison of how they test now, the NON-SAE numbers compared to the new SAE towing numbers.

    Has anyone seen Toyota's official numbers? Their web site unless it is buried does not seem to list them. Just a blank space.

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