• Sign in to follow this  
    Followers 0

    Mazda bringing first diesel to Brickyard 400


    By Drew Dowdell

    Managing Editor - CheersandGears.com

    July 26th, 2013

    Mazda is bringing the first diesel to compete at Indy in over 60 years and the first ever to compete in the Brickyard 400 race established in 1994. The last time a diesel powered race car ran on the Indy speedway was when a Cummins Diesel Special ran in 1952.

    Mazda will be razing a Mazda6 Skyactiv-D Clean Diesel with an engine over 51% stock. The engine is a 2.2 liter, direct injected turbo-diesel producing 400 horsepower @ 5000 rpm and 445 lb-ft of torque at 3600rpm. Mazda is counting on the fuel efficiency of diesel technology to result in less need to pit and refuel the car.

    It appears to be working. In an impressive season start, Mazda is behind lead manufacture Porsche by 1 point after 4 wins in 7 out of 12 races.

    Update: The Mazda6 Diesel is the first diesel to win a race at the Indy Speedway on Saturday. Mazda's #70 car took the lead with 47 laps remaining and held that position till the checkered flag waved. Mazda now leads Porsche in the GX class.

    Source: Mazda Media

    0


    Sign in to follow this  
    Followers 0


    User Feedback


    In thinking about this over the weekend, I do find this interesting that they are racing Diesel and yet not bringing diesel to the masses via retail.

    Guess they need to research it more. :P

    0

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites

    What do you mean "not bringing diesel to the masses"? It is going on sale in a few weeks.

    I have not seen anything other than stories about Mazda not bringing diesel or hybrids to the US Market. Is the diesel going on sale in europe? I know that is a market that needs them.

    0

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites

    They aren't bringing hybrids, but the diesels are coming to the US. Mazda6 is first and launching for sale in the next 6 - 8 weeks with a likely (though not officially announced) followup with the CX-5 in the next generation.

    0

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites

    That is very interesting, for some reason what I had read and seen in the news made me think Mazda was not bringing diesels here at all. Good to know.

    0

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites

    :metal: Rock on Mazda :metal: That will probably make other auto companies think about it. But then Audi did the 24hr lemans in a diesel and we did not see much change. Seems the more things change, the more they stay the same. I hope this brings alternative fuel into racing more and more.

    0

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites

    We didn't see much of a change back then... but Audi will have every model not starting with the letter R available with a diesel engine for the 2014 model year.

    0

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites

    I wonder if Audi will be using their race technology to give their auto's a performance boost with decent fuel mileage or will they truly go after max fuel mileage with a slight performance boost?

    I find it interesting how companies integrate their racing technologies into retail packages.

    Might be an interesting paper to do on how companies integrate their racing technology into profitable retail products.

    0

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites


    Your content will need to be approved by a moderator

    Guest
    You are commenting as a guest. If you have an account, please sign in.
    Add a comment...

    ×   You have pasted content with formatting.   Remove formatting

    ×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

    ×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor




  • Popular Stories

  • Today's Birthdays

    1. 67impss
      67impss
      (57 years old)
  • Similar Content

    • By William Maley
      BMW has been in a holding pattern in terms of producing diesel vehicles for the U.S. as they were awaiting approval from the EPA retesting diesel vehicles. Soon, 2017 model year diesel vehicles will be rolling off BMW's assembly lines and heading off to the U.S.
      "Diesel models will be going into production shortly at our manufacturing plants," said Rebecca K. Kiehne, product & technology spokesperson at BMW of North America to Green Car Reports.
      As we reported back in October, the EPA was holding back the certifications on a number of diesel vehicles as they subjecting them to new tests to uncover possible cheating - thanks Volkswagen. In our report, BMW said they would not start production of the 3-Series and X3 diesel models until the end of the year. Production of the X5 diesel would begin in January. 
      The production restart of BMW's diesels comes at an interesting time. The EPA is currently investigating the 3.0L EcoDiesel used in the Jeep Grand Cherokee and Ram 1500 for possible violations of the clean air act. Over at Volkswagen, the board has given the ok for the $4.3 billion settlement with the Department of Justice over the diesel emission scandal. 
      Source: Green Car Reports

      View full article
    • By William Maley
      BMW has been in a holding pattern in terms of producing diesel vehicles for the U.S. as they were awaiting approval from the EPA retesting diesel vehicles. Soon, 2017 model year diesel vehicles will be rolling off BMW's assembly lines and heading off to the U.S.
      "Diesel models will be going into production shortly at our manufacturing plants," said Rebecca K. Kiehne, product & technology spokesperson at BMW of North America to Green Car Reports.
      As we reported back in October, the EPA was holding back the certifications on a number of diesel vehicles as they subjecting them to new tests to uncover possible cheating - thanks Volkswagen. In our report, BMW said they would not start production of the 3-Series and X3 diesel models until the end of the year. Production of the X5 diesel would begin in January. 
      The production restart of BMW's diesels comes at an interesting time. The EPA is currently investigating the 3.0L EcoDiesel used in the Jeep Grand Cherokee and Ram 1500 for possible violations of the clean air act. Over at Volkswagen, the board has given the ok for the $4.3 billion settlement with the Department of Justice over the diesel emission scandal. 
      Source: Green Car Reports
    • By William Maley
      In 2005, Volkswagen was in dire straights. The company was going through a painful restructure and was looking into various ways to get itself back into shape. One of those ways was a possible deal with Daimler on possibly using their diesel technologies. But Volkswagen canceled the talks later that year and worked on their own diesel engines, which led to the cheating software and the mess it finds itself today.
      Bloomberg has learned from sources about a top-secret plan known as 'Project Tabletop'. The plan, spearheaded by then VW CEO Bernd Pischetsrieder, involved Volkswagen and Daimler possibly collaborating on projects and a possible deal where Volkswagen would get access to Diamler's BlueTec technologies for cleaning up diesel emissions by using urea injection. However, the talks were called off before an important meeting in August 2005. Sources claim that Volkswagen balked at cost of adding BlueTec to their vehicles -  about 1,000 euros per car. Plus, VW couldn't lower production costs to compensate for.
      Instead, Volkswagen would go on its own and continue working on their TDI engines. This got strong internal support from then chairman Ferdinand Piech. But it also brought a fair amount on controversy to Volkswagen's top management. Some believed that Volkswagen wouldn't be able to meet the stringent U.S. standards for diesel vehicles without the BlueTec technologies.
      Sure enough, in 2006, Volkswagen would begin developing the software cheat that would reduce emissions when it detected specific conditions to know it was being tested. It is unclear if there is a link between the deal falling through and development of the cheat.
      Source: Bloomberg

      View full article
    • By William Maley
      In 2005, Volkswagen was in dire straights. The company was going through a painful restructure and was looking into various ways to get itself back into shape. One of those ways was a possible deal with Daimler on possibly using their diesel technologies. But Volkswagen canceled the talks later that year and worked on their own diesel engines, which led to the cheating software and the mess it finds itself today.
      Bloomberg has learned from sources about a top-secret plan known as 'Project Tabletop'. The plan, spearheaded by then VW CEO Bernd Pischetsrieder, involved Volkswagen and Daimler possibly collaborating on projects and a possible deal where Volkswagen would get access to Diamler's BlueTec technologies for cleaning up diesel emissions by using urea injection. However, the talks were called off before an important meeting in August 2005. Sources claim that Volkswagen balked at cost of adding BlueTec to their vehicles -  about 1,000 euros per car. Plus, VW couldn't lower production costs to compensate for.
      Instead, Volkswagen would go on its own and continue working on their TDI engines. This got strong internal support from then chairman Ferdinand Piech. But it also brought a fair amount on controversy to Volkswagen's top management. Some believed that Volkswagen wouldn't be able to meet the stringent U.S. standards for diesel vehicles without the BlueTec technologies.
      Sure enough, in 2006, Volkswagen would begin developing the software cheat that would reduce emissions when it detected specific conditions to know it was being tested. It is unclear if there is a link between the deal falling through and development of the cheat.
      Source: Bloomberg
    • By William Maley
      Homogeneous charge compression ignition or HCCI engines are a unique prospect - use compression to ignite gasoline, like in a diesel vehicle. This allows for better fuel economy and lower emissions. A number of automakers have built prototypes and said they would be putting them into production down the road, but it has never happened. That may change in the near future.
      The Nikkei Asian Review reports that Mazda will be launching an HCCI engine for the 2018 Mazda3 (Axela in Japan). This will be part of Mazda's second-generation of SkyActiv technologies to improve fuel economy. According to the report, the engine could give certain Mazda3 models a fuel economy figure of 30 kilometers per liter (about 71 mpg on the U.S. cycle). The report doesn't say if this is for city, highway, or combined.
      Can Mazda do it or will it be like the others and not appear? We'll be watching to find out that answer.
      Source: Nikkei Asian Review

      View full article
  • Recent Status Updates

  • Who's Online (See full list)