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  • William Maley
    William Maley

    Production of the Mitsubishi Lancer to End In August

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      Wait, they still build the Lancer?

    There will be one less compact car on sale come August. Motor1 has learned from Mitsubishi Motors North America’s executive vice president and chief operating officer, Don Swearingen that production of the Lancer compact sedan will end this August. Of course. you are probably saying to yourself that Mitsubishi was still building the Lancer?! The answer is yes.

    Will Mitsubishi have a replacement for the Lancer, especially considering the partnership with Nissan? Swearingen said no. He told Autoblog that the sedan marketplace is shrinking and the Japanese needs to focus on products that make them money. Hence why they are focusing on crossovers with a new model that is slated to slot between the Outlander Sport and Outlander due later this year.

    The Lancer was never a big seller for Mitsubishi. Its best year was back in 2002 when the company moved 69,000 Lancers. In 2016, Mitsubishi only sold 14,304 Lancers.

    Source: Motor1, Autoblog

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    11 hours ago, Drew Dowdell said:

    hmm.. I thought it was already gone.

    So did I. Just saw a new one a few days....a tarted up model. Had to admit, maybe it's the old school like for sport compacts-but I am going to miss it......

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    quite dated, but those out there who need cheap wheels can find new or very slightly used ones for like 13 grand, just don't try to ever trade it in again.

    another distinction, for those who would want it instead of an outlander sport, but you can get an all wheel drive lancer if you wish.  A used AWD Lancer with few miles would be a great car to sell to a college student looking for a cheap payment and AWD for those road trips home in the winter.

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