• Sign in to follow this  
    Followers 0

    The Curtain Falls: Toyota Announces The End Of Australian Production In 2017


    • Toyota joins Ford and Holden with the departure of production in Australia.


    And then there were none.

    Toyota announced today at their Altona plant on the western outskirts of Melbourne that the company would end local production in 2017 and transition into a sales and distribution company. The move will affect 2,500 manufacturing jobs.

    "This is devastating news for all of our employees who have dedicated their lives to the company during the past 50 years,"said Toyota Australia President and CEO Max Yasuda.

    "While we have been undertaking the enormous task of transforming our business during the past two years, our people have joined us on the same journey, which makes it even more difficult to announce this decision. We did everything that we could to transform our business, but the reality is that there are too many factors beyond our control that make it unviable to build cars in Australia. Although the company has made profits in the past, our manufacturing operations have continued to be loss making despite our best efforts."

    The decision comes a few months after Holden and Ford announcing they would be shuttering their production operations in Australia and become a a sales and distribution company.

    Toyota's reasoning behind the closing is the same as Ford and Holden; the high value of the Australian dollar, high cost of production, and new free trade agreements.

    Source: Drive.com.au, Toyota

    William Maley is a staff writer for Cheers & Gears. He can be reached at william.maley@cheersandgears.comor you can follow him on twitter at @realmudmonster.

    Press Release is on Page 2


    10 February 2014

    TOYOTA AUSTRALIA ANNOUNCES FUTURE PLAN FOR LOCAL MANUFACTURING

    Toyota Australia today announced that it will stop building cars in Australia by the end of 2017 and become a national sales and distribution company.

    This means that local manufacturing of the Camry, Camry Hybrid and Aurion vehicles, as well as the production of four cylinder engines, will cease by the end of 2017.

    The decision was not based on any single factor. The market and economic factors contributing to the decision include the unfavourable Australian dollar that makes exports unviable, high costs of manufacturing and low economies of scale for our vehicle production and local supplier base.

    Together with one of the most open and fragmented automotive markets in the world and increased competitiveness due to current and future Free Trade Agreements, it is not viable to continue building cars in Australia.

    Toyota Australia President and CEO, Max Yasuda, was joined by Toyota Motor Corporation President and CEO, Akio Toyoda, as he made the announcement to employees late this afternoon.

    "This is devastating news for all of our employees who have dedicated their lives to the company during the past 50 years," Mr Yasuda said.

    "While we have been undertaking the enormous task of transforming our business during the past two years, our people have joined us on the same journey, which makes it even more difficult to announce this decision

    "We did everything that we could to transform our business, but the reality is that there are too many factors beyond our control that make it unviable to build cars in Australia.

    "Although the company has made profits in the past, our manufacturing operations have continued to be loss making despite our best efforts.

    "Our focus will now be to work with our employees, suppliers, government and the unions as we transition to a national sales and distribution company. Support services will be available to our employees and we will do everything that we can to minimise the impact of this decision on our employees and suppliers."

    Mr Yasuda said approximately 2,500 employees directly involved with manufacturing will be impacted when the plant stops building cars in 2017.

    There will also be an impact on the company's corporate divisions, which will be studied over the coming months to determine what roles and functions will remain in the future.

    Mr Yasuda said that Toyota was also committed to providing support to the industry as it prepares for the end of vehicle manufacturing in Australia.

    "We will work with our key stakeholders to determine how to provide the best support to our employees, suppliers and local communities during the coming years," Mr Yasuda said.

    "Not only do we need to ensure our local suppliers and employees can plan for their future, we also need to make sure that we continue to produce high quality vehicles and engines for our domestic and export customers."

    Toyota Australia will continue to be involved in its local communities and employ thousands of people both directly and indirectly via its extensive dealership network.

    It is the company's intention to import the Camry and Aurion vehicles beyond 2017, along with the entire range of Toyota passenger and commercial vehicles.

    0


    Sign in to follow this  
    Followers 0


    User Feedback




    Your content will need to be approved by a moderator

    Guest
    You are commenting as a guest. If you have an account, please sign in.
    Add a comment...

    ×   You have pasted content with formatting.   Remove formatting

    ×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

    ×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor




  • Popular Stories

  • Today's Birthdays

    1. 2005 EquinoxLS
      2005 EquinoxLS
      (41 years old)
    2. Shaula
      Shaula
      (36 years old)
  • Similar Content

    • By William Maley
      Dodge is doing something that can be considered as sacrilegious in the muscle car class. They are adding an all-wheel drive version of the Challenger to their lineup.
      The 2017 Challenger GT will go on sale early next year with a base price of $34,990 (includes $1,095 destination charge). The all-wheel drive system that the Challenger will use is the same one found in the Charger AWD - power is sent to the rear wheels until slip is detected, at which point the front axle will hook up to the transfer case and get power. The bad news is that you can only get the GT with the 3.6L Pentastar V6 with 305 horsepower and 286 pound-feet of torque, and eight-speed automatic. On the plus side, the GT will come with the Super Track Pak that brings launch control, performance pages, and other items.
      Not much sets the Challenger GT apart from other models in terms of the exterior. The GT comes with a new hood, LED head and taillights, decklid spoiler, and a set of 19-inch wheels wrapped in all-season tires.
      Source: Dodge
      Press Release is on Page 2


      New 2017 Dodge Challenger GT Is World’s First and Only All-wheel-drive American Muscle Coupe
      Dodge Challenger GT Joins Charger AWD to Complete the Dodge Lineup of All-wheel-drive Muscle Cars, Delivering Unparalleled Year-round Performance Segment-first: 2017 Dodge Challenger GT is the first two-door American muscle car with all-wheel drive, providing muscle car enthusiasts all-weather driving confidence exclusive to Dodge Challenger GT features the same high-performance all-wheel-drive system found in the award-winning Dodge Charger AWD with active transfer case and front-axle disconnect Dodge’s award-winning 3.6-liter Pentastar V-6 engine is standard, delivering 305 horsepower at 6,350 rpm and a responsive 268 lb.-ft. of torque at 4,800 rpm New 2017 Dodge Challenger GT model has a starting U.S Manufacturer’s Suggested Retail Price (MSRP) of $33,395 (excluding $1,095 destination charge) Dodge Challenger GT AWD production is scheduled to begin in January 2017 and vehicles will be available in dealerships the first quarter of 2017 December 7, 2016 , Auburn Hills, Mich. - Designed and engineered for world-class precision, the new 2017 Dodge Challenger GT all-wheel drive (AWD) delivers the performance, power and all-weather capability to carve through some of the worst weather Mother Nature can dish out.
       
      From winding through twisty stretches of mountain roads, escaping away to a snow-covered ski resort, to daily commutes through the slush and snow of Northeastern and Midwestern winters, the Challenger GT AWD is built to handle it all.
       
      “Dodge is shifting the muscle car paradigm with the new 2017 Dodge Challenger GT – the world’s first and only all-wheel-drive American muscle coupe,” said Tim Kuniskis, Head of Passenger Cars – Dodge, SRT, Chrysler and FIAT, FCA – North America. “The Challenger has always been the most wide-ranging and functional muscle coupe, and now, with the new 305-horsepower all-wheel-drive Challenger GT, we are stretching the functional and geographic boundaries even further.
      Available this winter
      The new 2017 Dodge Challenger GT AWD model has a starting U.S Manufacturer’s Suggested Retail Price (MSRP) of $33,395 (excluding $1,095 destination charge).
       
      With production beginning in January, the all-wheel-drive Dodge Challenger GT is scheduled to arrive at Dodge dealerships nationwide in the first quarter of 2017.
      Power, precision and prowess
      The 2017 Dodge Challenger GT AWD features Dodge’s award-winning 3.6-liter Pentastar V-6 engine, delivering 305 horsepower at 6,350 rpm and a responsive 268 lb.-ft. of torque at 4,800 rpm.
       
      A tuned induction system and dual exhaust from the manifolds back to the tips help deliver more than 90 percent of the engine’s peak torque from 1,800 to 6,400 rpm – all for outstanding drivability and responsiveness. With the standard TorqueFlite eight-speed automatic transmission, Challenger GT offers up to an EPA-estimated 18 city/27 hwy miles per gallon (mpg).
      The Dodge Challenger GT features Dodge’s high-performance all-wheel-drive system. Also found in the Charger AWD, this technologically advanced system includes an active transfer case and front-axle disconnect for excellent all-season performance and fuel economy. The Challenger GT seamlessly transitions between rear-wheel drive and all-wheel drive with no driver intervention. Under normal driving conditions, the front axle is disengaged and 100 percent of the engine’s torque is directed to the rear wheels. This preserves the outstanding fun-to-drive performance and handling characteristics inherent to rear-wheel-drive vehicles. When sensors indicate the need for additional traction, the system automatically engages the front axle, instantly transitioning Challenger GT into all-wheel-drive mode.
       
      Enhanced with Vehicle Dynamic Control (VDC), the Challenger GT AWD has impressive handling on all surfaces, especially snow and ice. VDC provides excellent traction on slippery surfaces and also helps the driver maintain the desired vehicle path. Enhancing the on-road dynamic performance using precise front-to-rear torque control integrated with the Electronic Stability Control (ESC) system, VDC maintains Challenger’s fun-to-drive character, regardless of road conditions.
       
      In addition, the new Dodge Challenger GT AWD features paddle shifters and Sport mode. With Sport mode active, gear changes are quicker and revs are held higher for even more performance-oriented acceleration and higher shift dynamics. For even more control, the driver can also use the die-cast steering-wheel-mounted paddle shifters and view gear election through the full-color Electronic Vehicle Information Center (EVIC) centered in the instrument cluster.
       
      The Challenger GT Super Track Pak button activates Dodge Performance Pages and launch control features embedded in the 8.4-inch touchscreen radio. Visible performance information, such as reaction times, 0-60 times, G-force indicator and lap times, can be monitored, and even mirrored, in the 7-inch thin-film transistor (TFT) customizable cluster display. The new Challenger GT model also features three-mode ESC with “full-off” mode, a fun feature for drifting through snowy scenes.
      All-weather traction all year long, rain, sleet, snow or shine
      For muscle car enthusiasts who want more all-weather traction, the new 2017 Dodge Challenger GT delivers premium amenities inside and out, including 19-inch aluminum wheels with Hyper Black finish and P235/55R19 BSW all-season performance tires, projector fog lamps, a deck-lid rear spoiler, ParkSense rear park assist and ParkView rear backup camera.
       
      Challenger GT is equally well equipped on the inside with standard features, such as premium Nappa leather seating, heated and ventilated front seats with four-way power driver lumbar adjustment, heated steering wheel with power tilt and telescoping column, Uconnect 8.4-inch touchscreen display with Apple CarPlay and Android Auto, six Alpine speakers with 276-watt amplifier, bright pedals, universal garage door opener and Hectic Mesh aluminum bezels.
       
      GT Interior Package
      The all-new GT Interior package, which is unique to this Challenger AWD model, includes performance Nappa leather and Alcantara suede seats – available on a V-6 for the first time – nine Alpine speakers, including a subwoofer and a 506-watt amplifier, and the Dodge performance steering wheel. U.S MSRP for the GT Interior package is $995.
      Performance-inspired design, all year round
      1971-inspired design, both inside and out, the Dodge Challenger GT features refined exterior styling and heritage muscle-car appearance with split grille, pronounced and functional power bulge hood, LED halo headlamps and LED tail lamps.

      View full article
    • By William Maley
      Dodge is doing something that can be considered as sacrilegious in the muscle car class. They are adding an all-wheel drive version of the Challenger to their lineup.
      The 2017 Challenger GT will go on sale early next year with a base price of $34,990 (includes $1,095 destination charge). The all-wheel drive system that the Challenger will use is the same one found in the Charger AWD - power is sent to the rear wheels until slip is detected, at which point the front axle will hook up to the transfer case and get power. The bad news is that you can only get the GT with the 3.6L Pentastar V6 with 305 horsepower and 286 pound-feet of torque, and eight-speed automatic. On the plus side, the GT will come with the Super Track Pak that brings launch control, performance pages, and other items.
      Not much sets the Challenger GT apart from other models in terms of the exterior. The GT comes with a new hood, LED head and taillights, decklid spoiler, and a set of 19-inch wheels wrapped in all-season tires.
      Source: Dodge
      Press Release is on Page 2


      New 2017 Dodge Challenger GT Is World’s First and Only All-wheel-drive American Muscle Coupe
      Dodge Challenger GT Joins Charger AWD to Complete the Dodge Lineup of All-wheel-drive Muscle Cars, Delivering Unparalleled Year-round Performance Segment-first: 2017 Dodge Challenger GT is the first two-door American muscle car with all-wheel drive, providing muscle car enthusiasts all-weather driving confidence exclusive to Dodge Challenger GT features the same high-performance all-wheel-drive system found in the award-winning Dodge Charger AWD with active transfer case and front-axle disconnect Dodge’s award-winning 3.6-liter Pentastar V-6 engine is standard, delivering 305 horsepower at 6,350 rpm and a responsive 268 lb.-ft. of torque at 4,800 rpm New 2017 Dodge Challenger GT model has a starting U.S Manufacturer’s Suggested Retail Price (MSRP) of $33,395 (excluding $1,095 destination charge) Dodge Challenger GT AWD production is scheduled to begin in January 2017 and vehicles will be available in dealerships the first quarter of 2017 December 7, 2016 , Auburn Hills, Mich. - Designed and engineered for world-class precision, the new 2017 Dodge Challenger GT all-wheel drive (AWD) delivers the performance, power and all-weather capability to carve through some of the worst weather Mother Nature can dish out.
       
      From winding through twisty stretches of mountain roads, escaping away to a snow-covered ski resort, to daily commutes through the slush and snow of Northeastern and Midwestern winters, the Challenger GT AWD is built to handle it all.
       
      “Dodge is shifting the muscle car paradigm with the new 2017 Dodge Challenger GT – the world’s first and only all-wheel-drive American muscle coupe,” said Tim Kuniskis, Head of Passenger Cars – Dodge, SRT, Chrysler and FIAT, FCA – North America. “The Challenger has always been the most wide-ranging and functional muscle coupe, and now, with the new 305-horsepower all-wheel-drive Challenger GT, we are stretching the functional and geographic boundaries even further.
      Available this winter
      The new 2017 Dodge Challenger GT AWD model has a starting U.S Manufacturer’s Suggested Retail Price (MSRP) of $33,395 (excluding $1,095 destination charge).
       
      With production beginning in January, the all-wheel-drive Dodge Challenger GT is scheduled to arrive at Dodge dealerships nationwide in the first quarter of 2017.
      Power, precision and prowess
      The 2017 Dodge Challenger GT AWD features Dodge’s award-winning 3.6-liter Pentastar V-6 engine, delivering 305 horsepower at 6,350 rpm and a responsive 268 lb.-ft. of torque at 4,800 rpm.
       
      A tuned induction system and dual exhaust from the manifolds back to the tips help deliver more than 90 percent of the engine’s peak torque from 1,800 to 6,400 rpm – all for outstanding drivability and responsiveness. With the standard TorqueFlite eight-speed automatic transmission, Challenger GT offers up to an EPA-estimated 18 city/27 hwy miles per gallon (mpg).
      The Dodge Challenger GT features Dodge’s high-performance all-wheel-drive system. Also found in the Charger AWD, this technologically advanced system includes an active transfer case and front-axle disconnect for excellent all-season performance and fuel economy. The Challenger GT seamlessly transitions between rear-wheel drive and all-wheel drive with no driver intervention. Under normal driving conditions, the front axle is disengaged and 100 percent of the engine’s torque is directed to the rear wheels. This preserves the outstanding fun-to-drive performance and handling characteristics inherent to rear-wheel-drive vehicles. When sensors indicate the need for additional traction, the system automatically engages the front axle, instantly transitioning Challenger GT into all-wheel-drive mode.
       
      Enhanced with Vehicle Dynamic Control (VDC), the Challenger GT AWD has impressive handling on all surfaces, especially snow and ice. VDC provides excellent traction on slippery surfaces and also helps the driver maintain the desired vehicle path. Enhancing the on-road dynamic performance using precise front-to-rear torque control integrated with the Electronic Stability Control (ESC) system, VDC maintains Challenger’s fun-to-drive character, regardless of road conditions.
       
      In addition, the new Dodge Challenger GT AWD features paddle shifters and Sport mode. With Sport mode active, gear changes are quicker and revs are held higher for even more performance-oriented acceleration and higher shift dynamics. For even more control, the driver can also use the die-cast steering-wheel-mounted paddle shifters and view gear election through the full-color Electronic Vehicle Information Center (EVIC) centered in the instrument cluster.
       
      The Challenger GT Super Track Pak button activates Dodge Performance Pages and launch control features embedded in the 8.4-inch touchscreen radio. Visible performance information, such as reaction times, 0-60 times, G-force indicator and lap times, can be monitored, and even mirrored, in the 7-inch thin-film transistor (TFT) customizable cluster display. The new Challenger GT model also features three-mode ESC with “full-off” mode, a fun feature for drifting through snowy scenes.
      All-weather traction all year long, rain, sleet, snow or shine
      For muscle car enthusiasts who want more all-weather traction, the new 2017 Dodge Challenger GT delivers premium amenities inside and out, including 19-inch aluminum wheels with Hyper Black finish and P235/55R19 BSW all-season performance tires, projector fog lamps, a deck-lid rear spoiler, ParkSense rear park assist and ParkView rear backup camera.
       
      Challenger GT is equally well equipped on the inside with standard features, such as premium Nappa leather seating, heated and ventilated front seats with four-way power driver lumbar adjustment, heated steering wheel with power tilt and telescoping column, Uconnect 8.4-inch touchscreen display with Apple CarPlay and Android Auto, six Alpine speakers with 276-watt amplifier, bright pedals, universal garage door opener and Hectic Mesh aluminum bezels.
       
      GT Interior Package
      The all-new GT Interior package, which is unique to this Challenger AWD model, includes performance Nappa leather and Alcantara suede seats – available on a V-6 for the first time – nine Alpine speakers, including a subwoofer and a 506-watt amplifier, and the Dodge performance steering wheel. U.S MSRP for the GT Interior package is $995.
      Performance-inspired design, all year round
      1971-inspired design, both inside and out, the Dodge Challenger GT features refined exterior styling and heritage muscle-car appearance with split grille, pronounced and functional power bulge hood, LED halo headlamps and LED tail lamps.
    • By William Maley
      Automakers go to great lengths to avoid being hit with the 25 percent chicken tax when they import trucks or vans into the U.S. Mercedes-Benz takes the cake for the most absurd method.
      For the past decade, Mercedes-Benz would build Sprinter vans fully in Germany before disassembling them and shipping the pieces to South Carolina. Workers in a small assembly building would put the vans back together. This method allowed Mercedes-Benz to claim the vans as "locally made".
      "I really couldn't believe it. To build up and tear down, that's really something that hurts me, personally. And the costs!" said Volker Mornhinweg, worldwide head of Mercedes-Benz Vans.
      Mornhinweg first learned about this back in 2010 and like us, found himself wondering 'WHY?!' Thankfully, Mornhinweg began working on making this process not seem like Rube Goldberg machine which will fully culminate with a new assembly plant in South Carolina that will be tasked with building the next-generation Sprinter, most likely in 2018.
      Source: Automotive News (Subscription Required) 

      View full article
    • By William Maley
      Automakers go to great lengths to avoid being hit with the 25 percent chicken tax when they import trucks or vans into the U.S. Mercedes-Benz takes the cake for the most absurd method.
      For the past decade, Mercedes-Benz would build Sprinter vans fully in Germany before disassembling them and shipping the pieces to South Carolina. Workers in a small assembly building would put the vans back together. This method allowed Mercedes-Benz to claim the vans as "locally made".
      "I really couldn't believe it. To build up and tear down, that's really something that hurts me, personally. And the costs!" said Volker Mornhinweg, worldwide head of Mercedes-Benz Vans.
      Mornhinweg first learned about this back in 2010 and like us, found himself wondering 'WHY?!' Thankfully, Mornhinweg began working on making this process not seem like Rube Goldberg machine which will fully culminate with a new assembly plant in South Carolina that will be tasked with building the next-generation Sprinter, most likely in 2018.
      Source: Automotive News (Subscription Required) 
    • By William Maley
      To say we were slightly disappointed to find out that the U.S.-Spec Toyota C-HR would only come with a 2.0L four-cylinder producing 144 horsepower would be an understatement. The European-spec C-HR has the choice of either a turbocharged 1.2L four or a hybrid, but neither of these powertrains will be showing up in the U.S.
      Car and Driver spoke with the C-HR's chief engineer, Hiroyuki Koba to find out why. Koba didn't say why the turbocharged 1.2L would not come to the U.S., but we're guessing Toyota didn't want to put the effort in getting this engine certified for the U.S. Also, performance numbers between the 2.0L and turbo 1.2L are similar (11 seconds for the 2.0 to hit 60 mph, 11.1 seconds for the 1.2).
      As for the hybrid, Koba said the decision comes down to the market, not engineering. At the moment, Toyota doesn't see the demand for this model in the U.S.
      Koba did admit there is a possibility for a more powerful version of the C-HR, but quickly added there aren't plans for this at the moment.
      Source: Car and Driver

      View full article
  • Recent Status Updates

  • Who's Online (See full list)