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  • G. David Felt
    G. David Felt

    Toyota takes on Tesla with Residential Power Walls for homes.

      O-Uchi Kyunden Systems, or Large House is the new Electrical Powerwall system from Toyota.

    O-Uchi Kyunden System or Large House system, a home battery system has been released by Toyota Motor Corporation based on the following mantra of "safe, long service life, high-quality, good value for price, and high performance" so that global customers can have peace of mind. Pre-orders starting June 2, 2022, are able to be placed with the Japan market getting deliveries starting in August 2022 through home builders and general construction companies and globally at a later date to others.

    O-Uchi Kyuden System Configuration is as follows:

    Using Toyota's established battery technology with the Toyota's battery control software, the O-Uchi Kyuden System provides a rated capacity of 8.7 kWh and a rated output of 5.5 kWh. Toyota believes this will provide a safe constant supply of electricity to an entire household during times of natural disasters as well as normal times.

    Toyota believes by using solar power on the roof of a residential home, encouraging renewable energy, this system can supply the appropriate amount of electricity based on a customer's needs throughout the day and night.

    The system not only allows for charging of EVs, but also for using the power in an EV (HEV, PHEV, BEV, FCEV) as 100V AC as a backup power source during power outages especially long-term outages giving users peace of mind.

    As of now for the Japanese market at the start, the Toyota App running on iOS 14.2 or Android 7.0 or later allows one to monitor and manage their system for power capacity, operation mode, and other settings to be viewed and set in real-time via one's smartphone or tablet.

    Toyota Releases Storage Battery System for Residential Use Based on Electrified Vehicle Battery Technology | Corporate | Global Newsroom | Toyota Motor Corporation Official Global Website

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    Hopefully once GM / Ford get their battery production going here in the U.S., they will also offer a powerwall that can be a total home / auto experience system. It would be great to have a battery backup system that can be useful during extreme weather events that seem to be far more common as of late.

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    Will be interesting to see the reviews of Toyota's power wall versus Tesla or any of the others out there in the market.

    Best Tesla Powerwall Alternatives For 2022 (solarreviews.com)

    Tesla Powerwall Vs Generac PWRCell 2021 Review - Sunbridge Solar

    It would seem that the Tesla is considered still the best, but others especially Generac is a very close second and when it comes to expansion has a better growth path.

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    On 6/3/2022 at 10:22 AM, David said:

    Will be interesting to see the reviews of Toyota's power wall versus Tesla or any of the others out there in the market.

    Best Tesla Powerwall Alternatives For 2022 (solarreviews.com)

    Tesla Powerwall Vs Generac PWRCell 2021 Review - Sunbridge Solar

    It would seem that the Tesla is considered still the best, but others especially Generac is a very close second and when it comes to expansion has a better growth path.

    Update on Tesla Powerwall seems Tesla will only sell it if you buy a solar roof to go with it. Auto purchase does not make you eligible to buy the Powerwall. Others are posting comments that Tesla is like all other auto companies in being in tight supply of battery cells at this time.

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