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    As the Diesel Emits: Volkswagen Admits Violations With 3.0L TDI V6


    • More Emission Troubles This Week As Volkswagen and Audi Say the 3.0L TDI V6 Does Violate Emission Regulations

    We're getting to the point where it is becoming a bad idea mentioning 'could it get any worse' when talking about Volkswagen and the diesel scandal it finds itself embroiled in. Sooner or later, it will get one step worse. Case in point is Volkswagen admitting on Friday that their 3.0L TDI V6 used on a number of their vehicles does violate emission standards.

     

    Earlier in November, the EPA and California Air Resources Board (CARB) accused Volkswagen of using a defeat device in a number of vehicles with the 3.0L TDI V6. Volkswagen denied the allegations at the time.

     

    But Volkswagen and Audi told EPA and CARB officials this week that yes the 3.0L TDI V6 did violate regulations since 2009. This comes down to Volkswagen not revealing the engine had auxiliary emissions control software to the government. With this new information, the number of vehicles involved has climbed to 85,000. This has also caused the two agencies to investigate whether or not this was intentional on Volkswagen's part.

     

    Audi spokesman Brad Stertz tells Reuters that the software isn't illegal in Europe, but said the company didn't tell government regulators either.

     

    "We are willing to take another crack at reprogramming to a degree that the regulators deem acceptable," said Stertz.

     

    Source: Reuters

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