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    As the Diesel Emits: Volkswagen's Current CEO Had No Knowledge of the Cheating


    • A report says Volkswagen's current CEO didn't know about the scandal till it broke

    Volkswagen can take a sigh of relief as it appears the current CEO, Matthias Müller, didn't have any prior knowledge of the diesel emission cheating. German newspaper Bild am Sonntag (via Reuters) got their hands on a report done by Jones Day which said Müller didn't find out the scandal till the EPA made the announcement - September 18, 2015 if you're wondering. Only a week later, Müller would be named CEO of Volkswagen. 

    Still, Müller's track record on dealing with the diesel emission mess is spotty. He has said the scandal was just a 'technical problem' and a misunderstanding about U.S. law - claims that were deemed false and got Müller in hot water.

    Source: Bild am Sonntag via Reuters

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    Being so high up in VW, I doubt he was that ignorant about this. Everyone else seems to have known about it, how does one work in a company and not know some of the dirty laundry going on.

    He just did not have any evidence show up yet that proves he was also in the know.

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    14 minutes ago, Drew Dowdell said:

    Bosch knew about it and sent letters to VW people about it.... there has to be more at the higher levels that knew

    Without a doubt.  this kind of dovetails with buying cars from companies where I am happy with their corporate culture.  I really like VW products, but would be reticent to buy one as I dislike their internal corporate business ethics.

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