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Honda FCX, First Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicle Acknowledged by IRS for $12,000 Fed Tax Credit

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08/08/2007 - TORRANCE, Calif. -

The IRS announced in July that the hydrogen-powered Honda FCX fuel cell vehicle became eligible for the Qualified Fuel Cell Motor Vehicle Credit program. The credit is part of the federal Energy Policy Act of 2005, which seeks to promote affordable, dependable and environmentally-sound production and distribution of energy for America's future.

Propelled by electricity that is generated by a hydrogen fuel cell in conjunction with an advanced Honda-designed ultracapacitor, the FCX fuel cell vehicle's only emission is water vapor.

"This tax credit helps offset the higher costs associated with the early development of advanced technology vehicles that reduce CO2 emissions and dependence on oil. It is a further validation that the FCX is a real vehicle and another step towards market viability" said Stephen Ellis, Fuel Cell Vehicle Marketing Manager at American Honda Motor Co., Inc.

In public use since 2002, the FCX is part of a long line of Honda vehicles developed to reduce the impact of transportation on the environment. The FCX is powered by Honda's originally developed fuel cell stack (Honda FC Stack) with the breakthrough capability to start and operate in freezing temperatures as low as -20 degrees Celsius, along with increased performance, range and fuel efficiency compared with earlier models.

The FCX is the only fuel cell vehicle certified by the California Air Resources Board (CARB) and U.S. EPA. The CARB and EPA have also certified the FCX as a Zero Emission Vehicle (ZEV) and the EPA has confirmed a range of 210 miles. With seating for four people, the FCX is practical for a wide range of real-world applications, allowing placement of over 15 vehicles on the road in the hands of customers, including the cities of Los Angeles; San Francisco; Las Vegas; Chula Vista, California; the California South Coast Air Quality Management District and the state of New York.

In 2005, Honda was the first to lease a fuel cell vehicle to an individual customer with a second customer added in 2007. Additionally, the Honda FCX is the only fuel cell vehicle fully certified to meet the applicable federal government crash safety standards. Honda undertook fuel cell research in 1989 and has been road testing vehicles in the United States since 1999. Honda has also been a member of the California Fuel Cell Partnership since 1999.

Press Release

Just to add, the information in this article is based off the current FCX, which is that funky blue looking coupe/minivan thing. The next gen FCX sedan is due out next year or so and will be a step above the current, having a range of 350 mi, and increased efficiency and performance (see here for info on the new FCX and pictures of the prototype).

Hydrogen Station

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I've seen a few whirring around. Wonder where they all fill up..

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Can I interpret this as the government paying me $12,000 to drive an FCX, because that is what you'd have to do for me to be seen in one.

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Seriously the FCX really is the poster child for birth control!

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I've seen a few whirring around. Wonder where they all fill up..

I believe they have home electrolysis stations for filling up.

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I believe they have home electrolysis stations for filling up.

thought that was still in development for the next gen

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How much does it cost?

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because that is what you'd have to do for me to be seen in one.

Seriously the FCX really is the poster child for birth control!

You guys do realize the sedan is a prototype?

And who cares what it looks like? Honda is making advancements in hydrogen fuel cell technology, which is considerably more viable than electric-only. Ranges equivalent to normal gasoline powered cars, with efficiency upwards of 60%, all packaged into a sleek, low profile sedan.

Honda has had hydrogen fuel cell vehicles on the road, in the hands of customers, for over 2 years. (as well as CNG powered Civic GX's for the last 7 years).

I believe they have home electrolysis stations for filling up.

thought that was still in development for the next gen

Honda has developed hydrogen refueling stations using both solar power and natural gas.

Read these:

Home Energy Station

Home Energy Station Generation 3

Hydrogen Station

the Home Energy Station is designed to work in a home-based refueling environment and is able to supply a sufficient amount of hydrogen to power a fuel cell vehicle, such as the Honda FCX, for daily operation while providing electricity for an average-sized household. A goal of this energy station is to provide high overall energy efficiency and to reduce greenhouse gas emissions through the more effective use of natural gas.

At the solar-powered water electrolyzing hydrogen station that has been operating on an experimental basis since 2001 at Honda R&D Americas in Torrance, California, employment of Honda’s water electrolyzing module, which boasts world-leading efficiency, as well as next-generation solar cell panels made by Honda Engineering, has further improved hydrogen production efficiency and greatly reduced CO2 emissions during system manufacturing.

In 2003 Honda established an experimental Home Energy Station that generates hydrogen from natural gas for use in fuel cell vehicles, while supplying electricity and hot water to the home through fuel cell cogeneration functions. In November 2004, in collaboration with Plug Power Inc. of the US, Honda began operating a second-generation Home Energy Station, which unifies natural gas reformer and pressurizing units into one compact component to reduce the overall volume by approximately 50%. Honda is continuing its efforts to develop systems required for a hydrogen-based society of the future through experiments with various hydrogen production and usage systems.

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can't the volt run on hydrogen and electric?

honda, you've been punk'd.

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can't the volt run on hydrogen and electric?

honda, you've been punk'd.

Not exactly, since the FCX is on the road now and actually exists outside of a 1-off concept.

The Volt's still several years away.

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i can't buy an FCX, these are just road mules. they are not 'on the market' either

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can't the volt run on hydrogen and electric?

honda, you've been punk'd.

i can't buy an FCX, these are just road mules. they are not 'on the market' either

But at least they exist. People are leasing them.

Yes, the Volt "can" run on hydrogen, in the same way that cars in the future "can" get 1,000 MPG. But it actually hasn't been done.

GM's existing fuel-cell efforts are with the HydroGen3 and upcoming FC Equinox.

Edited by empowah
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can't the volt run on hydrogen and electric?

honda, you've been punk'd.

the Volt architecture lends itself to be easily set up with a fuel cell as an electricity source. Specifics of what models will be offered haven't been really confirmed - the statements I've seen all have disclaimer-like statements. The main thing they seem to be pushing for with the Volt is a solid plug-in hybrid.

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i can't buy an FCX, these are just road mules. they are not 'on the market' either

Move to california, and you may be able to lease one. The current FCX is not a mule, it is a fully certified production vehicle, in use by several retail customers.

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