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William Maley

Industry News: Sales Of Diesel Powered Vehicles On The Rise

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William Maley

Staff Writer - CheersandGears.com

August 2, 2012

According to research firm Baum and Associates, American buyers are taking a liking to diesel vehicles. Through June of this year, 61,214 diesel-powered vehicles have been sold in the U.S., an increase of 27.5%.

That number might not sound like a lot, but sales of diesel vehicles are steadily climbing. From April to June, Diesel vehicles saw increases in sales ranging from 14.4% to 28.2%.

This news comes in the face of the high price of a gallon of diesel compared to gas. AAA reports that the national average cost of a gallon of diesel is $3.780, compared with $3.521 a gallon for regular gas.

"Despite some volatility in the auto market, clean-diesel auto sales have increased in 22 of the past 23 months with double-digit increases in 20 of those months. And diesel auto sales increased by more than 30 percent in 12 of these months," Allen Schaeffer, executive director of the Diesel Technology Forum, said in a statement.

Source: Kicking Tires


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Great Read, Very exciting to see alternatives to gas growing.

Course if we just went with CNG, we could have a nice clean drive at way lower cost than gas or diesel. :P

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I want to be able to pull stumps with my XTS.

Would be nice, but I'd borrow a friends truck for that....

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