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William Maley

VW News: As the Diesel Emits: German Transport Authority Says Volkswagen Only One to Cheat Emission Tests

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When Volkswagen admitted that it used illegal software in their diesel vehicles to cheat emission tests, questions arose as to whether or not any other automakers did something similar. The German Federal Motor Transport Authority (KPA) decided to investigate this and put 60 vehicles from various manufacturers, including Volkswagen, to the test. Their results revealed that Volkswagen was the only one automaker to cheat.

 

These results will be published in a report later this month, but German business paper Handelsblatt learned about the investigation and results from various sources and spilled the beans on it.

 

The KPA investigation started a few days after Volkswagen admitted to cheating emission tests. The authority brought in 60 different vehicles to conduct extensive emission testing in the lab and on the road. The testing was done in secrecy to prevent possible tampering from OEMs. The results of the investigation concluded that Volkswagen was the only automaker to cheat emission tests in Germany.

 

KPA's investigation also revealed there were “strange irregularities” in terms of emissions with other OEM's vehicles. But a source says the emission levels were in the legal limit.

 

Handelsblatt says the results of each vehicle involved in the testing have been sent to their respective automakers.

 

Source: Handelsblatt


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Very cool, I love level playing field testing like this. Cannot wait for the report to be published as I am interested in who had "Strange Irregularities".

 

Now Weird is that Audi and Porsche are not listed as they both have admitted on their diesels to using the same software. So their auto's should be failing the tests.

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Guest Howie

Very cool, I love level playing field testing like this. Cannot wait for the report to be published as I am interested in who had "Strange Irregularities".

 

Now Weird is that Audi and Porsche are not listed as they both have admitted on their diesels to using the same software. So their auto's should be failing the tests.

Since the article seems about "manufacturers", not "brands", it might be assumed that "VW" does include Audi and Porsche

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