Jump to content
dfelt

Diesel is dying based on this BBC Story

Recommended Posts

Stumbled across this story on the BBC that shows that 4 major cities will have a ban on all diesel auto's and Trucks by 2025.

http://www.bbc.com/news/science-environment-38170794

Paris

Mexico City

Madrid

Athens

These four cities are implementing complete bans on Diesel to improve air quality. Campaigners are pushing to have London Diesel free also by 2025. Very interesting read, plus I see they are converting more roads into bicycle lanes only. Bummer but the future is an ICE free future for many cities

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Time for the Nikoli Semi you wrote about....in all seriousness, humans can't seem to stop reproducing, and urban areas will continue to become more sensitive to pollution and air quality issues.

Bicycle is also excellent for an urban environment....

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Your content will need to be approved by a moderator

Guest
You are commenting as a guest. If you have an account, please sign in.
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoticons maximum are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.




  • Today's Birthdays

    1. gmfannyc
      gmfannyc
      Age: 35
  • Similar Content

    • By William Maley
      Another wave of fallout from the Volkswagen diesel emission scandal could be coming later this week in a German court. Reuters reports that Germany’s federal administrative court will be ruling whether or not local governments could ban diesel vehicles. 
      Environmental group DUH sued the Stuttgart and Duesseldorf governments for over levels of diesel particulate matter exceeding European Union limits after Volkswagen admitted to cheating on emission tests. Local courts ordered the governments to ban diesel vehicles that don't conform to current EU standards on days when pollution is bad. The two states where a number of automakers and suppliers reside appealed the decision to the federal administrative court.
      This move could cause serious damage to German automakers as it would cause a fall in resale values and overall sales. Investment Evercore ESI forecasts a five percent drop in diesel residual values, resulting in a loss of 1.6 billion Euros (about $2 billion) in operating profit "across eight European and U.S. carmakers."
      Source: Reuters

      View full article
    • By William Maley
      Another wave of fallout from the Volkswagen diesel emission scandal could be coming later this week in a German court. Reuters reports that Germany’s federal administrative court will be ruling whether or not local governments could ban diesel vehicles. 
      Environmental group DUH sued the Stuttgart and Duesseldorf governments for over levels of diesel particulate matter exceeding European Union limits after Volkswagen admitted to cheating on emission tests. Local courts ordered the governments to ban diesel vehicles that don't conform to current EU standards on days when pollution is bad. The two states where a number of automakers and suppliers reside appealed the decision to the federal administrative court.
      This move could cause serious damage to German automakers as it would cause a fall in resale values and overall sales. Investment Evercore ESI forecasts a five percent drop in diesel residual values, resulting in a loss of 1.6 billion Euros (about $2 billion) in operating profit "across eight European and U.S. carmakers."
      Source: Reuters
    • By William Maley
      Last week, Ford unveiled the Raptor Ranger. The bad news as we reported was the model wasn't going to come here, but a tweet from Ford's North America Product Communications manager gave some hope that possibly, a smaller Raptor could come.
      More fuel has been added to this fire via some comments made by the chief engineer for Ford Performance, Jamal Hameedi. Speaking with Australian outlet Drive, Hameedi said the truck "would do really well in the states."
      “I think it’s certainly like it’s a baby Raptor, it depends what you’re looking for. There are a lot of people that just want that size in a pickup truck and they don’t want anything larger,” said Hameedi. 
      Hameedi went on to say that the diesel engine found in the Ranger Raptor would likely be swapped for a gas engine.
      “I think most American off-roaders would actually prefer a petrol gas engine, but a diesel is the absolute way to go for the rest of the world.”
      We think a version of Ford's 2.3 EcoBoost could be the engine of choice for a U.S. variant. 
      But it will likely be a while before a final decision is made on the Ranger Raptor coming to the U.S.
      “We haven’t said anything about availability in the US, our first priority is to get a Raptor available to everyone on the planet earth. So Americans already have an F-150 Raptor, we’ve got to spread Raptors to the rest of the planet,” said Hameedi.
      Source: Drive

      View full article
    • By William Maley
      Last week, Ford unveiled the Raptor Ranger. The bad news as we reported was the model wasn't going to come here, but a tweet from Ford's North America Product Communications manager gave some hope that possibly, a smaller Raptor could come.
      More fuel has been added to this fire via some comments made by the chief engineer for Ford Performance, Jamal Hameedi. Speaking with Australian outlet Drive, Hameedi said the truck "would do really well in the states."
      “I think it’s certainly like it’s a baby Raptor, it depends what you’re looking for. There are a lot of people that just want that size in a pickup truck and they don’t want anything larger,” said Hameedi. 
      Hameedi went on to say that the diesel engine found in the Ranger Raptor would likely be swapped for a gas engine.
      “I think most American off-roaders would actually prefer a petrol gas engine, but a diesel is the absolute way to go for the rest of the world.”
      We think a version of Ford's 2.3 EcoBoost could be the engine of choice for a U.S. variant. 
      But it will likely be a while before a final decision is made on the Ranger Raptor coming to the U.S.
      “We haven’t said anything about availability in the US, our first priority is to get a Raptor available to everyone on the planet earth. So Americans already have an F-150 Raptor, we’ve got to spread Raptors to the rest of the planet,” said Hameedi.
      Source: Drive
    • By William Maley
      The New York Times dropped a bombshell of a report last week saying that German automakers funded an experiment that had 10 monkeys in airtight chambers, inhaling diesel fumes from a Volkswagen Beetle TDI. The experiment took place back at an Albuquerque, New Mexico laboratory in an effort to prove newer diesel vehicles were cleaner than older models. But researchers were unaware that the Beetle used in the experiment was equipped with a defeat device that allowed it produce fewer emissions in the lab than on the road.
      This experiment was brought to light via a lawsuit against Volkswagen in the U.S.
      The European Research Group on Environment and Health in the Transport Sector (E.U.G.T) commissioned the experiment. Funding for the group was provided by Volkswagen, BMW, and Daimler. The group did not do any research itself, instead commissioning scientists to conduct studies that could be used to defend the fuel. Last year, the group was shut down amid controversy over its work. The three automakers told the Times "the research group did legitimate scientific work."
      "All of the research work commissioned with the E.U.G.T. was accompanied and reviewed by a research advisory committee consisting of scientists from renowned universities and research institutes,” Diamler said in a statement.
      Both BMW and Diamler told the publication "they were unaware that the Volkswagen used in the Albuquerque monkey tests had been set up to produce false data." Volkswagen said at the time of original story that researchers involved in the study did not publish a complete report. Since then, Volkswagen has issued an apology.
      “We apologize for the misconduct and the lack of judgment of individuals. We’re convinced the scientific methods chosen then were wrong. It would have been better to do without such a study in the first place,” the German automaker said in a statement obtained by Bloomberg.
      But there is another twist to this story. German newspaper Stuttgarter Zeitung reported yesterday about a study done by the University of Aachen in Germany that had 25 people breath in diesel exhaust as part of a clinic. The study was funded by the E.U.G.T. and was referenced in annual reports from the group. The University said that it "had followed typical procedures, such as approval by an independent ethics commission as well as written consent from each participant." It is unclear whether or not participants were told what the experiment would entail.
      Nevertheless, it is another black eye for German automakers and diesel.
      Source: New York Times, Bloomberg, (2), Stuttgarter Zeitung, Automotive News (Subscription Required)

      View full article
  • My Clubs

  • Who's Online (See full list)

About us

CheersandGears.com - Founded 2001

We  Cars

Get in touch

Follow us

Recent tweets

facebook

×