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William Maley

Toyota News: Toyota To Cease Australian Manufacturing On October 3rd

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Toyota has announced that October 3, 2017 will be the date it will cease Australian production at their plant in Altona - a suburb of Melbourne. The date is 17 days before Holden shutters its production line in Elizabeth. In a statement, Toyota is planning to keep the AM and PM shifts at the plant until the plant closes. This is to ensure the company meets their goal of 61,000 vehicles for the year - 26,600 domestic and 34,400 exports.

"Our priority over the remaining months is to continue to support our employees in every way possible so that they are well prepared for the future," said Toyota Australia President Dave Buttner in a statement.

"We remain extremely proud of our rich manufacturing history which spans over 50 years. Our employees are committed to producing vehicles of the highest quality as we work towards our goal of 'last car = best global car'."

Toyota will begin phasing out production of various models beginning in August with the Aurion. This will be followed by the Camry Hybrid in September, and the standard Camry on October 3rd.

Once the Altona plant is closed, Toyota will begin importing the 2018 Camry from Japan.

Source: CarAdvice, Toyota
Press Release is on Page 2


31 January 2017

TOYOTA AUSTRALIA ANNOUNCES CLOSURE DATE

Toyota Australia has today announced that Tuesday 3 October 2017 will be its final day of vehicle production at its Altona manufacturing plant.

As part of the shutdown process, the plant will stop building Aurion vehicles in August, Camry Hybrid vehicles in September and Camry Petrol vehicles in October.

The company will continue operating both AM and PM shifts until the final closure date. This will ensure the total volume production of 61,000 vehicles for the year, made up of 26,600 domestic and 34,400 exports, is met. 

Toyota Australia President Dave Buttner reinforced the company's commitment to supporting employees throughout the transition period and beyond.

"Our priority over the remaining months is to continue to support our employees in every way possible so that they are well prepared for the future," Mr Buttner said. 

"We remain extremely proud of our rich manufacturing history which spans over 50 years. Our employees are committed to producing vehicles of the highest quality as we work towards our goal of 'last car = best global car'."

As part of Toyota Australia's transition to a national sales and distribution company, the consolidation of all corporate functions from Sydney to Melbourne will take effect by 1 January 2018. 

As a result of this consolidation and closure of manufacturing, the number of employees will reduce from 3,900 people to approximately 1,300. 

The head office will continue to be based in Port Melbourne and most of the Altona manufacturing site will be retained for new and relocated functions.


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Hopefully my fellow peeps will like Toyota's Global offerings. 

Be interesting to see what all changes.

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    • By William Maley
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      These SUVs prefer the roads to be straight as there is significant body motion when cornering. Blame the tall ride height and soft-suspension tuning. Steering feels very numb and slow, making it somewhat tough to figure out how much input is needed when turning. When the road is straight, both vehicles provide a smooth ride. I did find that on the highway, I needed to make constant corrections with the steering to keep it in the middle of the lane.
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      But for some people, the off-road capability and legendary reliability of these two models are more than enough to excuse the faults. That group of people though we have to think is getting smaller as time goes on and makes us wonder if the next-generation of the Land Cruiser and LX 570 will go through a dramatic change or not.
      Disclaimer: Toyota Provided the Vehicles, Insurance, and One Tank of Gas
      Year: 2018
      Make: Lexus
      Model: LX 570
      Trim: N/A
      Engine: 5.7L 32-Valve, DOHC, Dual VVT-i V8
      Driveline: Eight-Speed Automatic, Four-Wheel Drive
      Horsepower @ RPM: 383 @ 5,600
      Torque @ RPM: 403 @ 3,600
      Fuel Economy: City/Highway/Combined - 13/18/15
      Curb Weight: 5,815 lbs
      Location of Manufacture: Toyota, Aichi Prefecture, Japan
      Base Price: $89,980
      As Tested Price: $93,350 (Includes $1,195.00 Destination Charge)
      Options:
      Dual-Screen DVD Rear-Entertainment System - $2,005.00
      Cool Box - $170.00
      Year: 2018
      Make: Toyota
      Model: Land Cruiser
      Trim: N/A
      Engine: 5.7L 32-Valve, DOHC, Dual VVT-i V8
      Driveline: Eight-Speed Automatic, Four-Wheel Drive
      Horsepower @ RPM: 381@ 5,600
      Torque @ RPM: 401 @ 3,600
      Fuel Economy: City/Highway/Combined - 13/18/15
      Curb Weight: 5,815 lbs
      Location of Manufacture: Toyota, Aichi Prefecture, Japan
      Base Price: $83,685
      As Tested Price: $85,185 (Includes $1,295.00 Destination Charge)
      Options:
      Carpet Floor/Cargo Mat Set - $225.00
    • By William Maley
      As the Toyota Supra continues its slow march to production, the automaker is considering adding another sports car that may revive an iconic nameplate.
      "We want to have Celica back, we want to have the MR2 back," said Masayuki Kai, Assistant Chief Engineer on the Supra project.
      The biggest was Supra. Supra was number one, the biggest demand from the market. Now that we've brought Supra back, what will come next depends on the market needs."
      Kai suggested that nothing is set in stone, but did hint that the Celica could be an all-wheel drive performance coupe. The MR2 could keep its mid-engine layout if a business case could be made.
      There lies within the problem for Toyota - making the business case for either model. Kai said that today's market makes it quite challenging  "to introduce niche, small-volume performance models."
      "Sports car are becoming more and more expensive to develop. So a single company cannot afford to invest in all the tooling for parts and components, because the volume of sports car is quite small. A sports car requires a lot of specific components that you cannot share with other cars. The suspension components we're using on the Supra, you can't use on a sedan like Camry or Corolla. And as you know, all the homologation issues are also getting more and more complex and difficult," he said.
      One possibility is for Toyota is to forge a partnership like they did with BMW with the Supra, or Subaru with the 86/BRZ.
      Source: Road & Track

      View full article
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