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    IHS Automotive Says Electric Cars Catching On Faster Than Hybrids


    • Are Electric Vehicles Catching On Quicker Than Hybrids?

    While many still think electric vehicles are a niche, a new study from IHS Automotive suggests that EVs are actually catching on more quickly than hybrids when they were first introduced.

    The study looked at the cumulative global sales of the first-generation Toyota Prius, Chevrolet Volt, and Nissan Leaf in the first four years. IHS Automotive found that the Toyota Prius moved 52,200 units from 2000 to 2004. However, the Volt and Leaf have sold more vehicles in their respective four-year timeframes. The Chevrolet Volt and all of its derivatives saw sales of 68,507 units, while the Nissan Leaf saw sales of 96,477 units.

    It should be noted that while Toyota Prius went on sale in 1997 in Japan, IHS Automotive uses 2000 as the starting point for figuring out sales as that is when Toyota launched the model worldwide.

    The IHS Automotive study also points out that early expectations for EVs may have been inflated a lot, causing many to think of early EVs and plug-ins as failures in sales despite the relative success in sales around the world.

    Source: Automobile Magazine

    William Maley is a staff writer for Cheers & Gears. He can be reached at william.maley@cheersandgears.com or you can follow him on twitter at @realmudmonster.

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    I think once people realize the advantages of electric cars for certain applications, sales will continue to increase at 8-10 percent a year. Grandpa Kettle can still drive his blue air cooled split window without fear, however, as the internal combustion motor isn't going anywhere.

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    The luxury gold carts like the Leaf seem like a green solution but in reality produce even more Green house gas and toxic waste. I believe that they are over blown sales figures for the EV market. They talk about how many are sold and yet you still do not see many of them. Seems most are bought by gov agencies and sit around.

    EV's have their place to help reduce immediate pollution in large congested cities, but outside of that they are not very practical.

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    The luxury gold carts like the Leaf seem like a green solution but in reality produce even more Green house gas and toxic waste. I believe that they are over blown sales figures for the EV market. They talk about how many are sold and yet you still do not see many of them. Seems most are bought by gov agencies and sit around.

    EV's have their place to help reduce immediate pollution in large congested cities, but outside of that they are not very practical.

    Not so sure about that, they are popular here in Ohio. The Tesla is an amazing piece of engineering.

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    The luxury gold carts like the Leaf seem like a green solution but in reality produce even more Green house gas and toxic waste. I believe that they are over blown sales figures for the EV market. They talk about how many are sold and yet you still do not see many of them. Seems most are bought by gov agencies and sit around.

    EV's have their place to help reduce immediate pollution in large congested cities, but outside of that they are not very practical.

    Not so sure about that, they are popular here in Ohio. The Tesla is an amazing piece of engineering.

    Yes it is a great piece of Engineering, but how many can afford a $100,000 electric car.

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    Spark EV seems more remarkable to me.

    Really, the Volt is the way to go. Chevy needs to get a 25k Volt to market and then work on building volume with their system.

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    Spark EV seems more remarkable to me.

    Really, the Volt is the way to go. Chevy needs to get a 25k Volt to market and then work on building volume with their system.

    GM needs to get the VOLT system into the Chevy Equinox and GMC Terrain. They would have a sweet FWD CUV and if possible to do it with AWD they would clean up.

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    Looking forward to what the next generation of EVs will bring. The second-generation Volt and LEAF will be MY 2016, as will the $35,000 Tesla rumored to be named Model E. My guess is that Volt will come down another $5,000 in price, and LEAF will have an optional 150-mile range. Tesla should have no problems with demand for Model E; my guess is 100,000 units for the first full year of production. This year, they are on track to deliver 40,000 units of a car that costs twice as much. In the US, Model S is actually the best-selling car with a base MSRP of $60,000 or higher, outselling competitors like A7, CLS, 6 Series Gran Coupe, as well as exec limos like S-Class, 7-series, and A8, and not to mention, all of Jaguar.

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    Spark EV seems more remarkable to me.

    Really, the Volt is the way to go. Chevy needs to get a 25k Volt to market and then work on building volume with their system.

    GM needs to get the VOLT system into the Chevy Equinox and GMC Terrain. They would have a sweet FWD CUV and if possible to do it with AWD they would clean up.

    Absolutely, especially in the near future when people still want to drive SUV's and gas is 5.50 a gallon

    Looking forward to what the next generation of EVs will bring. The second-generation Volt and LEAF will be MY 2016, as will the $35,000 Tesla rumored to be named Model E. My guess is that Volt will come down another $5,000 in price, and LEAF will have an optional 150-mile range. Tesla should have no problems with demand for Model E; my guess is 100,000 units for the first full year of production. This year, they are on track to deliver 40,000 units of a car that costs twice as much. In the US, Model S is actually the best-selling car with a base MSRP of $60,000 or higher, outselling competitors like A7, CLS, 6 Series Gran Coupe, as well as exec limos like S-Class, 7-series, and A8, and not to mention, all of Jaguar.

    In the next ten years, I see myself buying one more premium small car (say, a MK 7 GTI) a model E, and one oddball Auto-x or collector car (think vintage Alfa GTV or something ODD)....a total of three cars...

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      In partnership with the Automobile Club of Southern California’s Automotive Research Center, AAA evaluated five 2016 model-year vehicles equipped with automatic emergency braking systems for performance within system limitations and in real-world driving scenarios that were designed to push the technology’s limits. Systems were tested and compared based on the capabilities and limitations stated in the owner’s manuals and grouped into two categories — those designed to slow or stop the vehicle enough to prevent crashes, and those designed to slow the vehicle to lessen crash severity. After more than 70 trials, tests reveal:
      In terms of overall speed reduction, the systems designed to prevent crashes reduced vehicle speeds by twice that of systems that are designed to only lessen crash severity (79 percent speed reduction vs. 40 percent speed reduction). With speed differentials of under 30 mph, systems designed to prevent crashes successfully avoided collisions in 60 percent of test scenarios. Surprisingly, the systems designed to only lessen crash severity were able to completely avoid crashes in nearly one-third (33 percent) of test scenarios. When pushed beyond stated system limitations and proposed federal requirements, the variation among systems became more pronounced. When traveling at 45 mph and approaching a static vehicle, the systems designed to prevent crashes reduced speeds by 74 percent overall and avoided crashes in 40 percent of scenarios. In contrast, systems designed to lessen crash severity were only able to reduce vehicle speed by 9 percent overall. “Automatic emergency braking systems have the potential to drastically reduce the risk of injury from a crash,” said Megan McKernan, manager of the Automobile Club of Southern California’s Automotive Research Center. “When traveling at 30 mph, a speed reduction of just 10 mph can reduce the energy of crash impact by more than 50 percent.”
      In addition to the independent testing, AAA surveyed U.S. drivers to understand consumer purchase habits and trust of automatic emergency braking systems. Results reveal:
      Nine percent of U.S. drivers currently have automatic emergency braking on their vehicle. Nearly 40 percent of U.S. drivers want automatic emergency braking on their next vehicle. Men are more likely to want an automatic emergency braking system in their next vehicle (42 percent) than female drivers (35 percent). Two out of five U.S. drivers trust automatic emergency braking to work. Drivers who currently own a vehicle equipped with automatic emergency braking system are more likely to trust it to work (71 percent) compared to drivers that have not experienced the technology (41 percent). “When shopping for a new vehicle, AAA recommends considering one equipped with an automatic emergency braking system,” continued Nielsen. “However, with the proliferation of vehicle technology, it’s more important than ever for drivers to fully understand their vehicle’s capabilities and limitations before driving off the dealer lot.”
      For its potential to reduce crash severity, 22 automakers representing 99 percent of vehicle sales have committed to making automatic emergency braking systems standard on all new vehicles by 2022. The U.S. Department of Transportation said this voluntary agreement will make the safety feature available on new cars up to three years sooner than could be achieved through the formal regulatory process. According to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, rear-end collisions, which automatic emergency braking systems are designed to mitigate, result in nearly 2,000 fatalities and more than 500,000 injuries annually. Currently, 10 percent of new vehicles have automatic emergency braking as standard equipment, and more than half of new vehicles offer the feature as an option.
    • By William Maley
      Mercedes-Benz is planning to launch a handful of electric vehicles in the near future, and those vehicles will be part of a new subbrand.
       
      Bloomberg has learned from sources that the German automaker will be taking a page out of BMW's playbook and introduce a new subbrand that will be comprised of two electric sedans and two SUVs - something we first reported back in May. A name hasn't been chosen yet according to the sources. What is for certain is that Mercedes will show off a concept electric SUV at the Paris Motor Show in September. Using a new platform for electric vehicles, the concept is expected to boast a range of 310 miles. Mercedes hopes to start selling vehicles under this subbrand before the end of the decade.
       
      But doing a subbrand for electric vehicles is a risky proposition. BMW's i hasn't made any real impact in terms of sales or recognition. This has caused the brand to delay plans for another i model. Whether Mercedes-Benz is able to avoid the pitfallls remains to be seen.
       
      Source: Bloomberg
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