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    William Maley

    Michigan Governor Signs Bill Allowing the Testing and Buying Of An Autonomous Vehicle

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      Michigan becomes more friendly with autonomous vehicles

    Michigan Governor Rick Snyder signed into law today a full suite regulations regarding the testing, use and eventual sale of autonomous vehicles in the state.

    “By establishing guidelines and standards for self-driving vehicles, we’re continuing that tradition of excellence in a way that protects the public’s safety while at the same time allows the mobility industry to grow without overly burdensome regulations,” said Synder in a statement. 

    The new law will allow vehicles without steering wheels or brake pedals to travel on public roads, companies to operate autonomous ride-hailing services, and sell autonomous vehicles of the public once they have been certified and tested. This law also establishes the Michigan Council on Future Mobility. Part of the state's department of transportation, the council will be tasked with developing policies and standards on autonomous vehicles, along with regulating connected vehicle networks and data sharing.

    Michigan's autonomous vehicle legislation has fewer restraints than states such as Nevada, Florida, and California.

    Source: Automotive News (Subscription Required), The Detroit News, Roadshow

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    Cool, I wonder if a fast and loose regulation will spur or hinder these auto monsters?

    I hope they better incorporate the cameras into the car than all the ugly warts on the top of them.

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      Source: Automotive News (Subscription Required)
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