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    Rumorpile: Smaller G-Class In The Cards?


    William Maley

    Staff Writer - CheersandGears.com

    October 17, 2012

    Car is reporting that Mercedes-Benz is planning a smaller version of the venerable G-Class to compete with the replacement for the Land Rover Defender.

    Internally nicknamed ‘mini-G’, the vehicle will be based on the MFA platform of the new Mercedes A-class. No, the 'mini-G' isn't the A-Class based crossover that we have been reporting about for the past few months or so, this happens to be an addition.

    Styling will draw heavily from the G-Class with a tall, upright stance and almost horizontal roof. Powertrains will come from the A- and B-Class, and include gas and diesel engines. There will be a two-wheel drive and a four-wheel drive models.

    The model hasn't been approved by Mercedes at the moment. If it was to be approved, Car says the earliest we could see it is in 2015.

    Source: Car Magazine

    William Maley is a staff writer for Cheers & Gears. He can be reached at william.maley@cheersandgears.com or you can follow him on twitter at @realmudmonster

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