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    William Maley

    Rumorpile: Next Subaru WRX STI Could Go Hybrid

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      Hybrid Power Could Be Coming To the Next-Generation STI

    Now for something completely out of left field. A report from Motoring.com.au says the next-generation Subaru WRX STI could go hybrid.

     

    A source tells the Australian website that the Japanese automaker has two hybrid systems under development as a way to increase performance while improving fuel economy and emission levels.

     

    The first system pairs a turbocharged 2.0L boxer-four with an electric motor and six-speed dual-clutch automatic. Total output of this stands at 321 horsepower, about 20 horsepower more than the current STI. The other system is a plug-in hybrid that would have the turbocharged engine powering the front wheels, while the back wheels will be solely powered by an electric motor on the rear axle.

     

    The report says we could be seeing the hybrid STI next year, followed by the plug-in a year later.

     

    Source: Motoring.com.au

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    This does not surprise me. With the amount of torque one can get from electric motors, the future is going to Hybrids and pure electric.

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