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    As the Diesel Emits: EU Commissioner Believes Volkswagen Should Compensate Owners In Europe Like U.S.


    • Volkswagen should compensate owners in Europe like those in the U.S.

    Tomorrow, we find out the details of the settlement between Volkswagen and the U.S. Government over the diesel emission scandal. As we reported last week, sources told various news outlets that part of the settlement would include compensation payments from $1,000 to $7,000 to owners. A European Union commissioner believes that should be extended to those in Europe.

     

    EU Industry Commissioner Elzbieta Bienkowska tells German newspaper Welt am Sonntag that Volkswagen should set up a similar compensation program for Europe.

     

    "Volkswagen should voluntarily pay European car owners compensation that is comparable with that which they will pay U.S. consumers," said Bienkowska.

     

    She said that it would be unfair for Volkswagen to treat European consumers differently than U.S. ones due to different legal systems.

     

    "But consumers in Europe should be treated differently than the US consumer is not a way to regain confidence."

     

    Source: Die Welt, Reuters

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    I would totally agree with what Europe is staying, yes VW could probably reduce what they have to pay out but by treating Europeans on a lesser level, VW is also saying screw you we will take the cheaper route cause we can and we really do not care about you. We just want to get back to selling auto's and making money.

     

    I think if Europe is OK with the US settlement, it would be in VW best interest to role out this settlement worldwide.

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    I cannot attest to the authenticity of the above infograph....I just found it when I typed in the Google "VW dieselgate fail" in Google Images.

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    I cannot attest to the authenticity of the above infograph....I just found it when I typed in the Google "VW dieselgate fail" in Google Images.

    Clearly interesting but an exaggeration as Opel has not been proven that they cheated yet.

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