• Sign in to follow this  
    Followers 0

    As the Diesel Emits: Volkswagen CEO Says Nein To Compensation For Europe


    • Compensation plan for Europe? Uh, no.

    Volkswagen is getting ready to start the $10 billion compensation program for owners of the 2.0L TDI engine in the U.S. But some folks want the German automaker to do something similar for TDI owners in Europe.

     

    "Volkswagen should voluntarily pay European car owners compensation that is comparable with that which they will pay U.S. consumers," said EU Industry Commissioner Elzbieta Bienkowska last week.

     

    In a interview with German newspaper Welt am Sonntag over the weekend, Volkswagen CEO Matthias Müller said that isn't going to happen.

     

    "But we have just a different situation," said Müller.

     

    "In the U.S. the (emission) limits are stricter, which makes the fix more complicated. And taking part in the buyback is voluntary (for customers), which is not the case in Germany, for example."

     

    The U.S.' regulations concerning emissions are some of strictest in the world, with automakers having to meet specific limits on how much pollutants come out of a tailpipe. This is why all diesel vehicles sold in the U.S. have some sort of after treatment system to help cut down on the amount of NOx emissions.

     

    In Europe, the regulations are bit more lax. This is why Volkswagen was able to fix a number of vehicles by reprogramming the engine computer and swapping some parts. For the U.S., the fix would have be more extensive with a number of parts being replaced or added, which means added cost.

     

    Source: Welt am Sonntag, Reuters

    0


    Sign in to follow this  
    Followers 0


    User Feedback


    Can anyone say Europe will be raising their emission levels to match the US in the future. I can, I bet they still end up in court and a big lawsuit will follow.

    0

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites


    Your content will need to be approved by a moderator

    Guest
    You are commenting as a guest. If you have an account, please sign in.
    Add a comment...

    ×   You have pasted content with formatting.   Remove formatting

      Only 75 emoticons maximum are allowed.

    ×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

    ×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor




  • Popular Stories

  • Today's Birthdays

    1. gmfannyc
      gmfannyc
      (34 years old)
  • Similar Content

    • By William Maley
      Hatchbacks have never sold well in the U.S., but that could be changing thanks to new entrants and hotted-up models. According to a forecast done by IHS Markit, sales of hatchbacks are projected climb 19 percent this year. By 2020, the firm projects sales of 567,000 hatchbacks. What has changed?
      Some of this comes down to hatchbacks finding a niche market. Michelle Malcho, spokeswoman for Chevy cars and crossovers tells The Detroit News that active, urban buyers who are wanting a bit more functionality with their vehicle are turning to hatchbacks.
      “I think the U.S. likes the functional thought. The hatch for some people offers that without stepping up to that next level ... It really does fit what you need to do on a daily basis,” said Malcho.
      Helping out are new models and hotted-up versions. The Chevrolet Cruze hatchback made up 10 percent of the model's total sales in January. Over at Ford, the sales of hotted-up versions of the Fiesta and Focus grew 21 percent last year.
      But Stephanie Brinley, senior analyst with IHS Automotive cautions this will only cause a slight spur some growth in the compact class.
      “Hatchback sales have not traditionally been good in the U.S. It’s a relatively small opportunity ... they should help stem the losses in the (small car) segment,” said Brinley.
      “The cars are just so much better than they were, and it’s no longer a penalty (to drive a hatchback). It’s taking a while, but people are starting to understand.”
      Source: The Detroit News

      View full article
    • By William Maley
      Hatchbacks have never sold well in the U.S., but that could be changing thanks to new entrants and hotted-up models. According to a forecast done by IHS Markit, sales of hatchbacks are projected climb 19 percent this year. By 2020, the firm projects sales of 567,000 hatchbacks. What has changed?
      Some of this comes down to hatchbacks finding a niche market. Michelle Malcho, spokeswoman for Chevy cars and crossovers tells The Detroit News that active, urban buyers who are wanting a bit more functionality with their vehicle are turning to hatchbacks.
      “I think the U.S. likes the functional thought. The hatch for some people offers that without stepping up to that next level ... It really does fit what you need to do on a daily basis,” said Malcho.
      Helping out are new models and hotted-up versions. The Chevrolet Cruze hatchback made up 10 percent of the model's total sales in January. Over at Ford, the sales of hotted-up versions of the Fiesta and Focus grew 21 percent last year.
      But Stephanie Brinley, senior analyst with IHS Automotive cautions this will only cause a slight spur some growth in the compact class.
      “Hatchback sales have not traditionally been good in the U.S. It’s a relatively small opportunity ... they should help stem the losses in the (small car) segment,” said Brinley.
      “The cars are just so much better than they were, and it’s no longer a penalty (to drive a hatchback). It’s taking a while, but people are starting to understand.”
      Source: The Detroit News
    • By William Maley
      The blame game over the Volkswagen diesel emission scandal continues with the former chairman Ferdinand Piëch saying that Volkswagen's top brass knew about the cheating months before it came to light.
      German newspaper Bild reported yesterday that Piëch told prosecutors that he informed Martin Winterkorn and four other members of Volkswagen's supervisory board about the possible cheating with their diesel engines. The other members include,
      Stephan Weil, prime minister of the German state of Lower Saxony Bernd Osterloh, works council chief Berthold Huber, former IG Metall union head Wolfgang Porsche These members have "unequivocally and emphatically" reject the allegations laid forth by Piëch. Volkswagen is none to happy about these accusations either and is considering possible legal options. 
      "The Board of Management will carefully weigh the possibility of measures and claims against Mr. Piëch," the company said in a statement. 
      A spokeswoman for Braunschweig prosecutors declined to comment when asked by Reuters about this story.
      It should be noted there is a bit of bad blood between Piëch and Volkswagen. In April 2015, Piëch was ousted as chairman for Volkswagen after a power struggle between him and Winterkorn. This might be Piëch wanting to settle some old scores and cause more problems for the company he once led.
      Source: Bild via Bloomberg, Reuters

      View full article
    • By William Maley
      The blame game over the Volkswagen diesel emission scandal continues with the former chairman Ferdinand Piëch saying that Volkswagen's top brass knew about the cheating months before it came to light.
      German newspaper Bild reported yesterday that Piëch told prosecutors that he informed Martin Winterkorn and four other members of Volkswagen's supervisory board about the possible cheating with their diesel engines. The other members include,
      Stephan Weil, prime minister of the German state of Lower Saxony Bernd Osterloh, works council chief Berthold Huber, former IG Metall union head Wolfgang Porsche These members have "unequivocally and emphatically" reject the allegations laid forth by Piëch. Volkswagen is none to happy about these accusations either and is considering possible legal options. 
      "The Board of Management will carefully weigh the possibility of measures and claims against Mr. Piëch," the company said in a statement. 
      A spokeswoman for Braunschweig prosecutors declined to comment when asked by Reuters about this story.
      It should be noted there is a bit of bad blood between Piëch and Volkswagen. In April 2015, Piëch was ousted as chairman for Volkswagen after a power struggle between him and Winterkorn. This might be Piëch wanting to settle some old scores and cause more problems for the company he once led.
      Source: Bild via Bloomberg, Reuters
    • By William Maley
      Automakers have been downsizing their engines and adding turbochargers to improve fuel economy while retaining power from larger displacement engines. But is there a point where this trend doesn't make sense anymore? Volkswagen believes that time is coming very soon.
      "The trend of downsizing is over," said Herbert Diess, Volkswagen's chairman.
      "Emissions tend to go up as engines get smaller."
      This is due to smaller engines needing to work much harder to produce the power figures of higher displacement engines, which in turns causes more fuel to be used. Currently, small displacement engines do very well in the European fuel economy and emission tests. But the test results have come under intense scrutiny as they don't match up to real-world tests. In a few years, the European Union will introduce new procedures that include tests in the lab and real-world. The new tests could put this trend at a standstill.
      Diess said they would continue to offer the turbocharged 1.0L three-cylinder and 1.6L turbodiesel, but wouldn't go any smaller in the future.
      Source: The Telegraph

      View full article
  • Recent Status Updates

  • Who's Online (See full list)