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    Volvo's 40 Series Concepts Show the Future of Their Small Cars

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      Volvo Previews Their Upcoming 40 Series Family


    Volvo has unveiled two new concepts that show what the future of their small cars will look like.

     

    Called the 40 Series concepts, Volvo says these show what is in store in terms of design and technology. The 40.1 is likely the preview to the XC40 crossover and the 40.2 is sneak peek into the next S40 sedan. Both concepts feature a number of design cues that we have seen on the XC90 and S90 such as 'Thor's Hammer' daytime running lights and wide grille.

     

    Both concepts use the new Compact Modular Architecture (CMA) that was jointly developed by Volvo and Geely. This platform will underpin Volvo's future small car lineup including a new electric vehicle. A range of three and four-cylinder engines will be on offer, along with a plug-in hybrid called the T5 Twin Engine. Surprisingly, the T5 Twin Engine will only be front-wheel drive. The T8 Twin Engine comes only in all-wheel drive. A new seven-speed dual-clutch will be paired with all of the engines.

     

    The good news is that Volvo will offer the 40 Series in the U.S. As to when we'll be seeing the production versions, the first model will come out in 2017. Many expect it to be the XC40, followed by the S40 and V40 hatchback.

     

    Source: Volvo

     

    Press Release is on Page 2


     

    Volvo provides the first look at its new range of smaller cars

     

    Volvo Cars, the premium car maker, today unveiled two new concept cars that move the Swedish brand in an audacious new direction and mark the official launch of its global small car strategy.

     

    Today’s newly-revealed 40 series concepts demonstrate for the first time how Volvo plans to expand into the large and lucrative global market for premium small cars with a range of vehicles that combine bold exterior and interior design with industry-leading connectivity, electrification and autonomous drive technologies.

     

    The new concept cars will be the first built around Volvo’s new Compact Modular Architecture (CMA), which has been specially created for smaller cars and which has liberated the company’s designers and engineers to explore bold and daring new directions.

     

    “Each member of our product family has its own distinct character, just like the members of a real family. CMA has helped us to capture something special, something youthful in our new concept cars. They have an energy, a disruptive and engaging urban character that makes them stand out amongst the crowd. This is the flavour of small Volvos to come,” said Thomas Ingenlath, Senior Vice President, Design, at Volvo Car Group.

     

    Volvo’s small car strategy is an essential element in its ongoing global operational and financial transformation. The Swedish company is currently implementing an ambitious revitalisation plan that will reposition the brand to compete with its global premium competitors within the next four years.

     

    Volvo’s new global small car range will include a pure battery electric vehicle as well as Twin Engine plug-in hybrid powertrain variants, in line with the company’s commitment to the electrification of its entire portfolio. Volvo plans to have sold a total of up to 1 million electrified cars by 2025 globally.

     

    “By taking a modular approach to both vehicle architecture and powertrain development we have succeeded in leap-frogging many of the players in the premium segment,” said Dr Peter Mertens, Senior Vice President Research & Development. “Our new battery electric powertrain variant opens yet another exciting chapter in the unfolding Volvo story.”

     

    On top of their daring exterior design and electrified powertrain options, the new cars will also offer a full range of innovative connectivity services, plus the world’s most advanced standard package of safety features and ground breaking Scandinavian interior design.

     

    “The new 40 series cars have the potential to improve our market penetration in an important growing segment,” said Håkan Samuelsson, president and chief executive. “An electric powertrain program including both a new compact Twin Engine plug-in hybrid as well as a pure electric car are central to the CMA architecture.” He added that the first new 40 series car is expected to go into production in 2017.

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    So Volvo stays conservative and bland. Brick on wheels based on that computer drawing.

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      My personal favorite part: It’s performance facts time!
      Genesis G70 3.3T: Turbocharged 3.3-liter V6. Stats: 365 HP and 376-pound feet of torque. 0-60: 4.5 seconds.
      Volvo T6: Turbocharged and supercharged 2.0-liter incline 4. Stats: 316 HP and 295-pound feet of torque. 0-60: 5.9 seconds.
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      What is your opinion? Which car do you think would suit you, and do you own the Audi, Genesis, or Volvo? Leave a comment below.
       
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