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Hyperloop is getting built by Musk?


David

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So Mr. Musk is in the news with announcing yesterday land agreements to start building the Hyperloop in January 2016 with completion in 2018.

 

http://www.msn.com/en-us/money/technology/musks-hyperloop-moves-closer-to-reality/ar-BBhZvZV?ocid=ansCNBC11

 

My question is will it really change the way we travel?

 

Will it truly get built from border to border or just a magic trick of distracting investors and the news from the poor performance of Tesla?

 

Your Thoughts?

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      Make: Kia
      Model: Stinger
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      Engine: 3.3L Twin-Turbo V6
      Driveline: Eight-Speed Automatic, All-Wheel Drive
      Horsepower @ RPM: 365 @ 6,000
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