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Tesla Model X to Have "Close to 10,000 Pounds Towing Capability"

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A little-known speech by a Tesla VP has revealed some big towing news for the Palo Alto automaker's upcoming Model X crossover. 

 

In an April speech recently unearthed by industry watchers, Tesla's VP of Regulatory Affairs, Jim Chen, reveals the Model X crossover possesses Class III towing capability. Vehicles meeting this category are capable of towing a gross trailer weight (GTW) of 8,500 lbs (3,855 kg). 

 

Chen's comments can be found here, beginning at the 9:35 mark. 

 

As a benchmark, the high-end GMC Yukon Denali is rated to tow 8,400 lbs (3,810 kg). That's right - according to Chen's figures, a Model X will exceed a traditional body-on-frame SUV. The Audi Q5, a direct competitor to the Model X, will tow 4,400 lbs (1,996 kg). 

 

It's unclear if the Class III rating is standard capability for the Model X or requires an optional package with a larger battery, upgraded cooling and more capable brakes. 

 

The Model X is slated for deliveries in fall 2015. 

 

Sources: TAGTVOnline/Autoevolution/Teslarati

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