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Worst Used Cars

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G. David Felt
Staff Writer Alternative Energy - www.CheersandGears.com

 

Worst Used Cars

 

Compare.com reviewed the insurance industry reports on auto's, accidents, quality reports and much more to build a 5 point list on used auto's and what NOT to buy.

 

The break down comes as follows:

 

1) Trade-Ins Dealers DO NOT WANT: 

  • Mini Cooper
  • Jaguar S-Type
  • Land Rover Discovery
  • Mazda CX-7

This is due to the high failure rate of the power-trains.

 

2) Dealers DO NOT WANT brands that are no longer made, unless they are limited production versions, but for sure they do not want the following:

  • PT Cruiser
  • Dodge Grand Caravan
  • SAAB
  • Suzuki
  • Saturn

3) Dealers do not want cars with HIGH COST OF OWNERSHIP:

  • Example given is 2010 Ford Focus with a cost of owner ship in first 5yrs of $27,805.

4) Dealers DO NOT WANT auto's with no title.

 

5) Dealers DO NOT WANT auto's with Funky smells such as:

  • Gasoline Smell
  • Burning Smell
  • Sweet Smell
  • Mildew Smell
  • Smoke Smell

So what do you think? Do you agree with this or not?

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Dealers not wanting Suzuki's or SAAB's certainly hasn't lowered the prices on used Kizashi's or 9-3's my way. It's probably less of an issue in the States. 

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The used car dealership I worked at years ago would not touch Land Rovers of any variety, be it auction or a trade in. They were garbage on the used market then and it doesn't seem like it has improved much today.

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