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William Maley

Porsche News: Porsche Adds Turbos To 911 Carrera and Carrera For 2017

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Porsche has revealed an updated 2017 911 before its official debut at Frankfurt. The update introduces new turbocharged engines for the Carrera and Carrera S models.

 

The 3.0L flat-six engine comes equipped with a set of twin turbos which adds an extra 20 horsepower. Here are the power ratings for both models,

 

911 Carrera: 370 horsepower, 331 pound-feet of torque
911 Carrera S: 420 horsepower, 368 pound-feet of torque

 

Both engines will also see a 12 percent increase in efficiency, meaning a slight increase in fuel economy. As for transmissions, both models come with a seven-speed manual as standard. Porsche's PDK dual-clutch is available as an option.

 

Porsche quotes performance figures of 4.0 seconds to 60 MPH and a top speed of 183 MPH for the Carrera, and 3.7 seconds to 60 MPH and 191 MPH for the Carrera S. The figures are based on models equipped with the PDK and optional Sport Chrono package.

 

Aside from the engine, Porsche has made changes to the suspension. Porsche's Active Suspension Management active damping system now becomes standard and lowers the ride height by 10 Millimeters. There is also new shock absorbers and wider rear wheels.

 

Inside, the 911 gets an updated 7-inch infotainment system that has multi-touch gesture capability and handwriting recognition. Apple Carplay capabilities and Google Earth integration finish off the changes.

 

The 2017 Porsche 911 arrives at dealers next March. Pricing is as followed,

  • 911 Carrera: $89,400
  • 911 Carrera S: $103,400
  • 911 Carrera Cabriolet: $101,700
  • 911 Carrera S Cabriolet: $115,700


Source: Porsche

 

 

Press Release is on Page 2


 

The Sports Car Legend Enhanced: the New Porsche 911 Carrera

  • New turbocharged engines, an advanced chassis, and new Porsche Communication Management


Atlanta, Georgia. Celebrating its debut at the Frankfurt International Auto Show, the new 911 Carrera is taking performance and everyday usability to new heights. Innovative flat-six engines derived from four decades of turbocharging used in racing and on road cars not only make this the fastest 911 Carrera ever, but also provide abundant torque for superior passing power. An advanced chassis offering an even more sophisticated combination of ride comfort and performance characterizes the handling of the new 911. For the first time, rear-axle steering is available as an option for the Carrera S, significantly enhancing its already superb agility. These improvements reduce the lap time on the North Loop of the Nürburgring to just 7 minutes and 30 seconds, making it 10 seconds faster than the previous Carrera S.

 


Many exterior features of the 911 Carrera have been visually refined from new headlights with four-point daytime running lights to integrated door handle recesses, a redesigned rear deck lid with vertical louvers, and new rear lights – including the characteristic four-point brake lights. The new standard Porsche Communication Management system with a multi-touch display offers an expanded range of functions and simplified usability.

 

New turbocharged engines: 20 horsepower increase, reduced fuel consumption
The completely new engine generation featuring twin-turbo technology enhances the driving pleasure of the 911 Carrera and provides a 20 hp increase compared to the previous models. The 3.0 liter engine in the standard Carrera now develops 370 hp. Using turbochargers with modified compressor wheels, a model-specific exhaust system, and a different tune for the engine management system, the 911 Carrera S delivers 420 hp from the same displacement. The new Porsche 911 Carrera and Carrera S engines are characterized by significantly increased torque. Offering up to 331 lb.-ft. and 368 lb.-ft., respectively, from 1,700 rpm up to 5,000 rpm, both powertrains supply generous torque over a broad powerband. Reaching up to 7,500 rpm, the new engine generation also maintains relatively high engine speeds for a turbocharged powertrain – accompanied by the familiar Porsche sound.

 

Traditionally, a new 911 offers enhanced performance and efficiency compared to the predecessor. Depending on the model variant, the new engines are almost twelve percent more efficient compared to the previous generation according to the New European Drive Cycle (NEDC). EPA ratings will be available at a later date.

 

The new 911 models also boast impressive performance: the 911 Carrera Coupé with Porsche-Doppelkupplung (PDK) and Sport Chrono Package sprints from zero to 60 miles per hour in 4.0 seconds – making it two tenths of a second faster than its predecessor. The 911 Carrera S with PDK and Sport Chrono Package needs just 3.7 seconds (also 0.2 s faster). Both models reach higher top track speeds: the 911 Carrera is now able to reach 183 miles per hour, while the 911 Carrera S can achieve up to 191 miles per hour. All new Carrera variants are offered with a manual seven-speed transmission as standard.

 

When equipped with the optional Sport Chrono Package, the 911 Carrera now comes with a mode switch on the steering wheel, derived from the hybrid map switch in the 918 Spyder. The mode switch consists of a rotary dial with four positions for the driving modes Normal, Sport, Sport Plus, and Individual. Depending on the optional equipment installed in the car, the Individual setting allows drivers to configure their own specific vehicle set-up for the chassis, Auto Start/Stop system, PDK shifting strategy, and Sport Exhaust System. On models equipped with the PDK transmission, the mode switch has a "Sport Response" button, which pre-conditions the drivetrain for maximum acceleration.

 

A standard feature: reengineered PASM with chassis lowered by ten millimeters
The uniqueness of the 911 Carrera stems from its ability to blend refined everyday comfort with exceptional performance. On the new generation, Porsche has increased the dynamic capability even further than before. The revised PASM chassis (Porsche Active Suspension Management), which lowers the ride height by ten millimeters, is a standard feature. It helps improve driver control during fast cornering. New shock absorbers enhance comfort thanks to an even more precise response characteristic and improved body control during spirited driving. New standard wheels with five twin spokes are equipped with tires that offer reduced rolling resistance and enhanced grip. Furthermore, the width of the rear rims has been increased by 0.5 to 11.5 inches on all variants. The rear tires of the 911 Carrera S now measure 305 instead of 295 millimeters in width.

 

Rear-axle steering is available as an option for the 911 Carrera S, adopted from the current 911 Turbo and 911 GT3. It further enhances the turn-in behavior of the 911. Additionally, it increases driving precision when changing lanes at higher speeds. At the same time, it ensures greater maneuverability in city traffic thanks to a turning radius that is 1.6 feet smaller than without this option. The improved handling is transmitted to the driver via the new steering wheel generation with a design based on the steering wheel from the 918 Spyder. For enhanced everyday practicality, Porsche offers an optional electro-hydraulic lift system with lifting cylinders that are integrated into the front axle struts. At the touch of a button, the ground clearance at the front axle is increased by 40 millimeters within 5 seconds. This is particularly useful when clearing speed bumps or steep driveways.

 

New Porsche Communication Management including online navigation
A standard feature of the new 911 Carrera models is the newly developed Porsche Communication Management System (PCM), including an online navigation module. The PCM can be operated by multi-touch gestures on the seven-inch display, similar to a smartphone. Handwritten user inputs are recognized. Mobile phones and smartphones can now also be connected via Wi-Fi. Also new is the option of connecting an iPhone® to the PCM to utilize Apple CarPlay™.

 

Real-time traffic information is available for significantly enhanced navigation. It gives the driver a quick overview of the traffic situation and guarantees dynamic adaptation of the route to this information. Google® Earth and Google® Streetview are also being integrated for the first time to offer better orientation. Porsche Car Connect and the Connect Plus module can be used for remotely controlled vehicle functions, transferring destinations to the PCM for navigation and streaming music using third-party service providers via the PCM.

 

Market launch in March 2016
The new Porsche 911 Carrera models will be launched in the United States in March of 2016. Manufacturer's suggested retail prices start as follows:


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Nice more HP, underwhelmed in the torque department and the same look they have had for the last 20, 30, no 40+ years?

 

You truly have to be a smart sized person to fit and a hard core Porsche lover as there is nothing special about these cars IMHO.

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I have never been much of a Porsche fan, but I do give them credit for getting a lot of acceleration out of not a lot of torque.  You wouldn't think a 368 lb-ft of torque car would run 3.7 seconds 0-60, but Porsches do seem to make the most of their power.  In that regard, you can probably use all the power almost all the time on a track, where a lot of these high power cars are mostly just straight line burners, and can't put the power down in a corner.

 

Which reminds me on Top Gear one time, Jeremy Clarkson drove a Boxter S around Monza and could drive it hard, and posted a similar lap time to Hammond who had something like a Pagani Zonda that has just too much power to keep control of for a non race car driver.

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      In a memo sent out by Porsche chief executive Oliver Blume, Kerner and the other two people are suspected of having knowledge that the engines developed by Audi had illegal cheat software. Blume would also confirm Kerner's arrest in the memo.
      “We reject these allegations and will do our utmost to clear up the matter,” said Blume.
      A Porsche spokesman declined to comment.
      Source: Reuters

      View full article
    • By William Maley
      I couldn’t believe my eyes as to what stood before me. In the driveway stood an Alfa Romeo Giulia Quadrifoglio. I had to touch it to see if I was imagining it. Okay, I am being a bit hyperbolic, but considering the long time it took Alfa Romeo to get its affairs in some semblance of order, it is amazing that the Giulia is on sale.

      Still, I had a bit of trepidation with spending a week in the Giulia Quadrifoglio. The past year has seen a number of outlets reporting various gremlins pop up on their test vehicles. Would my particular one be spared? If so, what does the Giulia Quadrifoglio offer over the competition?
      Alfa Romeo is known for styling vehicles that stand out and Giulia Quadrifoglio is no exception. Up front resides the traditional Alfa triangle grille and large openings in the bumper with mesh inserts. The carbon fiber hood features gentle sculpting and a set of air vents in the channels. The side profile features more of the gentle sculpting on the doors, along with carbon fiber side skirts and 19-inch wheels finished in dark gray. The rear is where the Giulia Quadrifoglio makes its intentions known to the world with a carbon fiber lip spoiler and massive rear diffuser with large exhaust pipes sitting on either end. Finishing off the vehicle are cloverleaf badges on the front fenders and a dark blue finish. 
      At first glance, the Giulia’s interior looks elegant. The dash has a flowing wave shape that is higher on the driver’s side to make space for the instrument cluster and infotainment system. Material choices such soft-touch plastics, carbon fiber accent trim, and a small-rimmed steering wheel with Alcantara and carbon fiber help set the Quadrifoglio apart from other Giulia models. But Alfa Romeo earns some red marks as the center console is littered with cheap plastics - the controller for the infotainment system and gear lever being the key offenders.
      Our test Giulia Quadrifoglio came with the standard leather and Alcantara sport seats. A set of carbon fiber Sparco racing seats are available as an option, but it is one we would recommend trying out first. Sitting in a Quadrifoglio with the optional seats, I found that I could not fully settle into them due to my wide shoulder blades. The standard seats offer increased bolstering to hold you and a passenger when the road gets twisty. I would like to see a little bit more cushioning in the seats as it becomes somewhat uncomfortable the longer you sit in them. The back seat in Giulia is average for the class, offering a decent amount of head and legroom for those under six-feet. Getting in and out of the back seat is not easy due to a narrow opening.
      All Giulia Quadrifoglios come equipped with an 8.8-inch infotainment system. Controlling this is a rotary knob in the center console, along with using voice commands. The system itself is very frustrating for a number of reasons. For one, the system is slow when put against competitors. It takes a few moments to switch between various menus. Also, certain functions don’t work as you might expect. For example, turning the knob in the navigation system doesn’t zoom in or out. You have to scroll the navigation menu to find the Zoom command to allow this function. Other issues I experienced during my week-long test of the Giulia included,:
      The system wouldn’t play my iPod if I had it paused for more than minute or if I switched to another audio source and then back to the iPod. Connecting my iPhone 7 Plus to the system via Bluetooth took on average about 45 seconds. I had the system crash on me twice during the week I had the Giulia. One of those crashes required me to turn off the vehicle and start it back up to get the system working again. Alfa Romeo needs to go back to the garage and do some serious work with this infotainment system.
      Underneath the carbon fiber hood lies the beating heart of the Quadrifoglio, a 2.9L twin-turbo V6 with 505 horsepower and 443 pound-feet of torque. Drive is sent to the rear-wheels via an eight-speed automatic transmission. Quadrifoglio models have four drive modes - Race, Dynamic, Natural, and Advanced Efficiency and each one alters the engine’s behavior. Advanced Efficiency and Natural are about the same with the throttle being a bit more laid back. But that isn’t to say the Giulia isn’t quick in either mode. It has more than enough oomph to leave other cars in the dust when leaving a stop light or merging. But the engine really comes alive when in Dynamic or Race. The throttle sharpens up and the exhaust opens up to deliver a tantalizing soundtrack. Mash the pedal and hold on because this engine will throw you back. The engine sings at mid and high-rpms with speed coming on at an astonishing rate. Alfa says the Quadrifoglio can hit 60 mph in 3.8 seconds and I can say they are right on the money.
      The automatic transmission is quite impressive. In Normal and Advanced Efficiency, the transmission delivers smooth gear changes. Turn to Dynamic or Race and the gear changes are snappy and fast. Oddly, the automatic transmission exhibits some hesitation when leaving a stop. This is a problem more attune with dual-clutch transmissions.
      EPA fuel economy figures for the Giulia Quadrifoglio are 17 City/24 Highway/20 Combined. My average for the week landed at 19.7 mpg.
      Handling is where the Giulia Quadrifoglio truly shines. Enter into a corner and Giulia hunkers down with little body roll and gives you the confidence to push a little bit further. Steering is another highlight, offering quick response and decent weight. The only complaint I have with the steering is that I wished for some road feel.
      There is a trade-off to Giulia’s handling and that is a very stiff ride. Even with the vehicle set in Advanced Efficiency or Natural mode, the suspension will transmit every road imperfection to your backside. Wind and road noise isolation is about average for the class.
      It is time to address the elephant in the room and that is Alfa Romeo’s reliability record. Since the Giulia went on sale last year, numerous outlets have reported various issues from a sunroof jamming to a vehicle going into a limp mode after half a lap on a track. The only real issues I experienced during my week dealt with infotainment system which made me breathe a sigh of relief. Still, the dark cloud of reliability hung over the Giulia and I never felt fully comfortable that some show-stopping issue would happen. This is something Alfa Romeo needs to remedy ASAP.
       Now we come to end of the Giulia Quadrifoglio review and I am quite mixed. Considering the overall package, the Quadrifoglio is not for everyone. No, it isn’t just because of reliability. This vehicle is a pure sports car in a sedan wrapper. It will put a big smile on your face every time you get on the throttle or execute that perfect turn around a corner. But it will not coddle you or your passengers during the daily drive. Add in the material quality issues and concerns about reliability, and you have a mixed bag.
      To some, that is the charm of an Alfa Romeo. Within all of those flaws is a brilliant automobile. For others, it is something that should be avoided at all costs.
      Disclaimer: Alfa Romeo Provided the Giulia, Insurance, and One Tank of Gas
      Year: 2017
      Make: Alfa Romeo
      Model: Giulia
      Trim: Quadrifoglio
      Engine: 2.9L 24-Valve DOHC Twin-Turbo V6
      Driveline: Eight-Speed Automatic, Rear-Wheel Drive
      Horsepower @ RPM: 505 @ 6,500
      Torque @ RPM: 443 @ 2,500 - 5,500
      Fuel Economy: City/Highway/Combined - 17/24/20
      Curb Weight: N/A
      Location of Manufacture: Cassino, Italy
      Base Price: $72,000
      As Tested Price: $76,995 (Includes $1,595.00 Destination Charge)
      Options:
      Driver Assist Dynamic Plus Package - $1,500.00
      Harman Kardon Premium Audio System - $900.00
      Montecarlo Blue Metallic Exterior Paint - $600.00
      Quadrifoglio Carbon Fiber Steering Wheel - $400.00

      View full article
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