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Should Apple buy Tesla?

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G. David Felt
Staff Writer Alternative Energy - www.CheersandGears.com

 

Should Apple buy Tesla?

 

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I came across this story posted in LinkedIn "What if Elon Musk ran Apple?" and this got me to thinking about the pros and cons of if this happened what would Apple become and what would Tesla become?

 

The story states Apple has $200 Billion in cash on hand and could easily pay the current $33 billion market price for Tesla. Story has a mistake as they talk about Tesla $20 billion on the books for the 400,000 Tesla 3 on pre order. This is actually only $13 Billion worth at the $35,000 stated price. Yet they do point out that Elon has built a couple electric auto's, new battery storage for the home, flew a space ship to the international space station and back and now can land it upright on a floating platform and he is now working on a hyperloop mass transit system for california.

 

The story does state that Apple seems to have lost it's mojo for innovation and even with the current competent Business focused CEO, Apple is slipping off their peak of success.

 

So SHOULD APPLE BUY TESLA?

 

Would this be a better way for Apple to go with their own electric self driving auto than building from scratch?

 

List out your Pro's and Con's for what you think?

 

 

 

 

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What people don't realize is that whenever Tesla stocks takes a tumble, Musk buys back stock. Which means he bails out investors, and takes a hit whenever they make an equity offering. He's doing what he can to will the company to success. In fact, Tesla is the one he is most involved with. SpaceX and SolarCity are much more hands-off.

 

They're very close to making it. Much closer than anyone else has in a long while. Yeah there are nagging problems...but I wouldn't expect anything less.

 

Tesla is not a miracle, they may have some award winning prestige but now is when they come down to Earth and start building cars that are affordable, and most of all grown up.

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Oh... and back to topic.

 

No. I think Apple is a company if wanting to buy any automaker...they either want a killer deal or they want a car company they can control, and fold into their brand identity.

 

I don't think either is possible with a car company like Tesla.

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