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Why Are Manual Transmissions Disappearing?

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This story is posted by MSN in their auto forum from a U.S. News and World Report story on "Why Are Manual Transmission Disappearing?" 

Thought it was an interesting piece. I agree with some of what is said but also feel there is a lack of effort on why some might still want a manual or how they can keep the value by being an informed sales person.

I will agree that the best anti-theft device is a manual transmission now. Seems the news has more and more stories about the craziness of people breaking in to steal an auto and when it is a manual they end up having to leave.

http://www.msn.com/en-us/autos/ownership/why-are-manual-transmissions-disappearing/ar-BBwHYFp?li=BBnb7Kz 

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