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Senior Republican Group led by James A. Baker III calls for Carbon Tax!

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G. David Felt - Staff Writer Alternative Energy - www.cheersandgears.com

Senior Republican Group led by James A. Baker III calls for Carbon Tax!

This just hit the NY times in their Science section. Per their story two former Secretary of State (James A. Baker III & George P. Shultz) and a former secretary of the Treasury ( Henry M. Paulson Jr.) has proposed a free-market principles based carbon tax policy. This new policy is to be delivered to the White House today Feb 15th to VP Mike Pence, Jared Kushner, Gary D Cohn and Ivanka Trump.

Interesting in that the interview by the NY times states that Mr. Baker says even Ronald Reagan would approve of this policy. They also state that Exxon Mobil is in support of this Carbon Tax policy.

Interesting is that this is a carbon tax on the fossil fuel point of entry into the economy rather than a tax paid at the pump. It is very interesting to read their take on this climate change policy of Carbon Tax. Be more interesting after it is presented to Trump, the House and the Senate on what they have to say and get the deep details on the policy to see if it really makes sense. Enjoy the full read at:

NY Times Story

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