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Audi News: Audi Q8 e-tron and Q8 Sportback e-tron Become the Top of the Line for Audi Electric SUVs and Crossovers


David

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In 2018 Audi introduced the world to the e-tron, the age of electromobility had arrived and this marked the start of the electric future for the four rings. Audi has been setting the standards in the electric luxury-class SUV segment and continues that trend with the new Audi Q8 e-tron family of EVs.

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The Q8 e-tron moves forward from 2018 to 2023 by taking pre-orders now and deliveries will start in February 2023. Customers will get the following:

  • More battery capacity and higher charging performance
  • Fresh exterior, new brand design and dynamic driving characteristics
  • Net-carbon-neutral production and a first-time use of recycled materials in a safety-related component

Markus Duesmann, charman of the board of management of Audi AG had this to say:

“With our corporate strategy ‘Vorsprung 2030’, we’ve set a fixed date for our withdrawal from combustion engines and clearly decided that Audi will be a fully electric brand within 11 years,” “The new Audi Q8 e-tron, with its improved efficiency and range and refined design, is another important component in our electric portfolio to get people excited about electromobility with emotional models that are suitable for everyday use.”

Audi's press release had plenty of executives talking in many various gray modes of executive speak, but the real meat and potatoes of what has changed came from the engineering side about the new Q8 Family, Audi's top of the line luxury EVs.

Audi has decided to elevate the Audi product line to move up stream in luxury with the new corporate identity with a two-dimensional design of the four rings on the exterior. Audi highlights the vehicles face with the projection light singleframe. The Q8 is also the first of the models to feature the new model badging with Audi lettering on the B-pillar.

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This minor point of change from a bulky badge on the side of the ICE versions of Audi is also focused on the improvements for airstream over and around the auto in maximizing electric efficiency.

Audi Maximizing Space and Comfort

  • Q8 Sportback dimensions
    • 4.915 meters long, 1.937 meters wide, 1.619 meters tall = 193.5 inches long, 76.26 inches wide, 63.74 inches tall
  • Q8 SUV dimensions
    • 4.915 meters long, 1.937 meters wide, 1.633 meters tall = 193.5 inches long, 76.26 inches wide, 64.29 inches tall
  • Both are 2 millimeters lower and 39 millimeters wider = .08 inches lower and 1.535 inches wider
  • Wheelbase for both EVs is 2.928 meter = 115.276 inch wheelbase
  • Storage Volume
    • 569 liters (20.09 cubic feet) for the SUV
    • 528 liters (18.646 cubic feet) for the Sportback
    • 62 liters (2.19 cubic feet) in the Frunk

Drivetrain Variants - Q8 are driven by dual motors and SQ8 are trimotors with torque vectoring.

  • Audi Q8 50 e-tron
    • 250 kW and 664 Nm of torque and a range of 491 km = 335 HP, 490 lb-ft of torque, 305 miles of range
    • Top speed of 200 km/h = 124 mph
  • Audi Q8 Sportback 50 e-tron
    • 250 kW and 664 Nm of torque and a range of 505 km = 335 HP, 490 lb-ft of torque, 314 miles of range
    • Top speed of 200 km/h = 124 mph
  • Audi Q8 55 e-tron
    • 300 kW and 664 Nm of torque and a range of 582 km = 402 HP, 490 lb-ft of torque, 362 miles of range
    • Top speed of 200 km/h = 124 mph
  • Audi Q8 Sportback 55 e-tron
    • 300 kW and 664 Nm of torque and a range of 600 km = 402 HP, 490 lb-ft of torque, 373 miles of range
    • Top speed of 200 km/h = 124 mph
  • Audi SQ8 e-tron
    • 370 kW and 973 Nm of torque and a range of 494 km = 496 HP, 718 lb-ft of torque, 307 miles of range
    • Top speed of 210 km/h = 130 mph
  • Audi SQ8 Sportback e-tron
    • 370 kW and 973 Nm of torque and a range of 513 km = 335 HP, 718 lb-ft of torque, 319 miles of range
    • Top speed of 210 km/h = 130 mph

Battery Capacity and Charging

  • Q8 50 e-tron = 95 gross kWh battery pack
    • Maximum charging performance is 150 kW with 80% charged in a few more minutes over the big battery pack
  • Q8 55 and SQ8 e-tron = 114 gross kWh battery pack
    • Maximum charging performance is 170 kW with 80% charged in 31 minutes
  • Home charging
    • Q8 50 charges in 9hrs and 15 minutes (110V) or 4hrs and 45 minutes (220V)
    • Q8 55 and SQ8 charges in 11 hours and 30 minutes (110V) or 6hrs (220V)

Comfort and Sportiness 

The Audi Q8 comes standard with an air-spring suspension with controlled shock absorption. Total height adjustment can be varied by a total of 76 millimeters or 3 inches depending on driving situation.

Parking Enhancements

The Q8 e-tron's come with 40 driver assistance systems that can use the five radar sensors, five cameras and 12 ultrasonic sensors.

The new Q8 e-tron has optionally digital matrix LED headlights, numerous interior upgrades and options such as an air quality package that not only uses filtration but a true 4 zone independent climate control system. Q8 seats come standard with pneumatic seats and backrest adjustments that can also include an optional massage function.

Q8 have gone with a totally touch display system with voice control, replacing all conventional switches and knobs.

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8 hours ago, David said:

Home charging

  • Q8 50 charges in 9hrs and 15 minutes (110V) or 4hrs and 45 minutes (220V)
  • Q8 55 and SQ8 charges in 11 hours and 30 minutes (110V) or 6hrs (220V)

 

Honestly, 11.5 hours to charge on a 110v outlet doesn't sound bad at all. I could live day to day off of that pretty easily. 

I'd assume I'd rarely dig into the bottom 15% of a battery pack with my weekly habits so a slow charge would be adequate. 

I assume these are a 10% to 90% charge, when it says 80%? 

Edited by ccap41
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38 minutes ago, ccap41 said:

Honestly, 11.5 hours to charge on a 110v outlet doesn't sound bad at all. I could live day to day off of that pretty easily. 

I'd assume I'd rarely dig into the bottom 15% of a battery pack with my weekly habits so a slow charge would be adequate.

Yeah, I sleep for at least 8, even if that only gets me to 50%, that's enough for my commute for the next day and then plug it in another 8 the next night.

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22 minutes ago, Drew Dowdell said:

Yeah, I sleep for at least 8, even if that only gets me to 50%, that's enough for my commute for the next day and then plug it in another 8 the next night.

Definitely. The only days that I do more than 5-10 miles regularly are Saturday and Sunday and even then, it's pretty rare to exceed 100 miles so MAYBE Sunday night/Monday morning I wouldn't be "full". Zero issue. 

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23 minutes ago, ccap41 said:

Definitely. The only days that I do more than 5-10 miles regularly are Saturday and Sunday and even then, it's pretty rare to exceed 100 miles so MAYBE Sunday night/Monday morning I wouldn't be "full". Zero issue. 

And I gotta say, that is a pretty impressive charge rate on the Q8 for a 110v outlet. I wonder what they are doing different to get that.  For perspective, a Tesla can gain 6 miles of range an hour while a Bolt EUV can gain 4.  Audi is claiming 32 miles of range an hour on Level 1.... when that is more like mid-range Level 2 speeds.  That makes me think there is a misprint or translation issue.

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9 minutes ago, Drew Dowdell said:

And I gotta say, that is a pretty impressive charge rate on the Q8 for a 110v outlet. I wonder what they are doing different to get that.  For perspective, a Tesla can gain 6 miles of range an hour while a Bolt EUV can gain 4.  Audi is claiming 32 miles of range an hour on Level 1.... when that is more like mid-range Level 2 speeds.  That makes me think there is a misprint or translation issue.

Audi has standardized with an onboard 22kWh charging controller for use by 110, 220 and DC fast charge. This compares to Tesla that has 110 set at 7kW, 11kW if on 220 or 22kW for DC/Supercharging. Audi engineering did say that the new controllers are auto sensing of the electrical you plug into so that is always maximizes the fastest charge rate for your auto.

Tesla has stated they are moving the S & X models to 17kW for home charging either at 110 or 220 and 22kW for DC/Supercharging. Tesla 3 & Y are still on the old 7/11kW charging for home use but 22kW for DC/Supercharging.

The one area that can surprise people is if you are not on a modern electrical box, but a single phase 32A connection, Tesla drops you to only 4kW charge rate

Tesla has stated they are looking at even higher levels for their cybertruck.

My thinking is that Audi using an AI based controller can maximize over older controller tech.

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@Drew Dowdell Now you have my curiosity peaked and as such, looking at other EVs. 

This has me a bit disappointed in Cadillac.

Using Your Dual Level Charging Cord | LYRIQ (cadillac.com)

The Dual Level Charge Cord allows a vehicle-controlled electrical connection to your home or charging location. The Dual Level Charge Cord allows you to swap between 120-volt (3-pronged) and 240-volt (4-pronged) plugs to best fit your available wall receptacles. In this way, it supports charging at two levels: Level 1 charging at 120V (up to 1.4 kW) and Level 2 charging at 240V (up to 7.7 kW).

Talk about SLOW.

I am now interested in what the GMC Hummer, Sierra and Chevrolet Silverado have for controllers.

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27 minutes ago, Drew Dowdell said:

And I gotta say, that is a pretty impressive charge rate on the Q8 for a 110v outlet. I wonder what they are doing different to get that.  For perspective, a Tesla can gain 6 miles of range an hour while a Bolt EUV can gain 4.  Audi is claiming 32 miles of range an hour on Level 1.... when that is more like mid-range Level 2 speeds.  That makes me think there is a misprint or translation issue.

Now THAT would make more sense, because that's why I was impressed with it as well. Usually those 100+kwh packs take like a day to charge from a 110v outlet, not overnight. 

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7 minutes ago, David said:

Audi has standardized with an onboard 22kWh charging controller for use by 110

Not to put too fine a point on it... but that is BS.  There just ain't no way. 22kWh at 110v is pulling 200 amps. I don't know how many houses in the US are wired to be able to pull that kind of power through a single outlet, but I'm pretty sure that number is fairly close to zero.  My entire electrical panel is only rated for 200 amps and its pretty new. The highest rated standard 110v outlet it rated for 30 amps, which translates to 3.3 kWh. A Q8 trying to pull 22kWh at 110v will pop breakers or burn down houses.  So there is some missing or mistranslated information from Audi here.

That said, if you can afford a Q8 etron, you can afford to get a 50 amp 220 outlet in your garage. It averages like $600.

11 minutes ago, David said:

@Drew Dowdell Now you have my curiosity peaked and as such, looking at other EVs. 

This has me a bit disappointed in Cadillac.

Using Your Dual Level Charging Cord | LYRIQ (cadillac.com)

The Dual Level Charge Cord allows a vehicle-controlled electrical connection to your home or charging location. The Dual Level Charge Cord allows you to swap between 120-volt (3-pronged) and 240-volt (4-pronged) plugs to best fit your available wall receptacles. In this way, it supports charging at two levels: Level 1 charging at 120V (up to 1.4 kW) and Level 2 charging at 240V (up to 7.7 kW).

Talk about SLOW.

I am now interested in what the GMC Hummer, Sierra and Chevrolet Silverado have for controllers.

I think there's something wrong with the Audi release.  This isn't a manufacturer limitation, it is a physics limitation.

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I hope GM is able to upgrade their onboard controller soon as per their own website, the GMC Hummer, GMC Sierra and Chevrolet Silverado EVs all will use the same 11.5kW onboard controller for home charging that allows 4 miles of charge per hour if on 110, 40 miles of range if on 220. Controller allows 100 miles of range per 10 minutes for Level 2 DC/Fast charger.

Audi should be able to maximize sales with their new controller which will also be in the Porche EV products.

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4 minutes ago, David said:

Found this on their living with electric section. Have to say that I would have expected better from GM on this.

Home Charging for Electric Vehicles | Chevrolet

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Only the newest of new houses will have the ability to put in an 80 amp circuit and even then, they'd have to be requested by the building buyer.  Most homes get 150 amp standard or maybe 200 amp for a larger house.  To have room for an 80 amp, you'll need a 250 amp or more box and not a lot of houses have that.

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3 minutes ago, Drew Dowdell said:

Not to put too fine a point on it... but that is BS.  There just ain't no way. 22kWh at 110v is pulling 200 amps. I don't know how many houses in the US are wired to be able to pull that kind of power through a single outlet, but I'm pretty sure that number is fairly close to zero.  My entire electrical panel is only rated for 200 amps and its pretty new. The highest rated standard 110v outlet it rated for 30 amps, which translates to 3.3 kWh. A Q8 trying to pull 22kWh at 110v will pop breakers or burn down houses.  So there is some missing or mistranslated information from Audi here.

That said, if you can afford a Q8 etron, you can afford to get a 50 amp 220 outlet in your garage. It averages like $600.

I think there's something wrong with the Audi release.  This isn't a manufacturer limitation, it is a physics limitation.

I understand, the browser auto translated the German press release for me. I get the point you're saying also. 

This makes me wonder if the homes in Europe have a bigger power load that gets delivered to the home compared to the U.S.

I wonder how many states will change home standards for electrical. I know part of the green home building here in Washington state, all new built homes and this includes condos and townhomes have to have a dedicated 220V 50amp outlet for home charging.

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2 minutes ago, David said:

I hope GM is able to upgrade their onboard controller soon as per their own website, the GMC Hummer, GMC Sierra and Chevrolet Silverado EVs all will use the same 11.5kW onboard controller for home charging that allows 4 miles of charge per hour if on 110, 40 miles of range if on 220. Controller allows 100 miles of range per 10 minutes for Level 2 DC/Fast charger.

Audi should be able to maximize sales with their new controller which will also be in the Porche EV products.

Again, this is going to be a house limitation.  The controller might be able to accept a higher rate, but the house probably can't provide it.

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@Drew Dowdell I wonder if the AI auto sensing 22kW controller actually steps down when it has a smaller power supply, and they just are not calling it out in the press release. 🤔

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Just now, David said:

I understand, the browser auto translated the German press release for me. I get the point you're saying also. 

This makes me wonder if the homes in Europe have a bigger power load that gets delivered to the home compared to the U.S.

I wonder how many states will change home standards for electrical. I know part of the green home building here in Washington state, all new built homes and this includes condos and townhomes have to have a dedicated 220V 50amp outlet for home charging.

Yes, Euro homes are all 230V.  I don't know what a typical amperage rating for their homes are.

A 50 amp 220V circuit will still not get max speed on those GM Ultium and Audi vehicles. It only gets you to 12kW.   You need 30 more amps to get the speeds GM is claiming in that graphic above.

 

13 minutes ago, ccap41 said:

Now THAT would make more sense, because that's why I was impressed with it as well. Usually those 100+kwh packs take like a day to charge from a 110v outlet, not overnight. 

64 hours to get a Bolt EUV from 1% to 100% on 110v.

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9 minutes ago, Drew Dowdell said:

Only the newest of new houses will have the ability to put in an 80 amp circuit and even then, they'd have to be requested by the building buyer.  Most homes get 150 amp standard or maybe 200 amp for a larger house.  To have room for an 80 amp, you'll need a 250 amp or more box and not a lot of houses have that.

Course I am sure the power companies would not mind putting in a second power panel and meter to an older home.

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5 minutes ago, David said:

Course I am sure the power companies would not mind putting in a second power panel and meter to an older home.

I'm not sure it i necessary. A standard 50 amp / 220V outlet will be sufficient to charge nearly any EV from 1% - 100% in 10 hours. Most people won't be charging like that.

For example, if I am typically driving 40 miles a day and my charger can add 20 miles of range per hour, I'll get back to my programmed max charge in 2 hours. I don't see the need to spend thousands to install an 80 amp charger to charge in 1 hour and 15 minutes instead.

Where these high speed charge controllers are an advantage is for DC fast charging.  Charging at home can remain leisurely.

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2 minutes ago, ccap41 said:

Doesn't a Bolt charge like not very quick though? 

The latest Bolt has DC fast charging. 100 miles in 30 minutes.  Home charging at Level 2 is 26 miles of range per hour and that's probably maxing out a 50 amp circuit.  The Q8 etron or Hummer EV will pull power at the same rates, but because those are both less efficient vehicles, it will be a lower range per hour.

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@Drew Dowdell This discussion has me wondering if it would not be cheaper in the long run and maybe VW has looked at this, as to why they have an AI charging controller that can handle high rates but is variable based on the plugged-in power supply over building slower controllers that are fixed at a set rate.

With the U.S. seeing a surge of building new production sites that can supply U.S. made chips to the auto industry here, could we see a standardized controller that has a maximum rate to support the fastest 800V charging yet still downgrade to slower speeds based on the supplied electrical charge coming from the wall.

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27 minutes ago, David said:

@Drew Dowdell This discussion has me wondering if it would not be cheaper in the long run and maybe VW has looked at this, as to why they have an AI charging controller that can handle high rates but is variable based on the plugged-in power supply over building slower controllers that are fixed at a set rate.

With the U.S. seeing a surge of building new production sites that can supply U.S. made chips to the auto industry here, could we see a standardized controller that has a maximum rate to support the fastest 800V charging yet still downgrade to slower speeds based on the supplied electrical charge coming from the wall.

Having one variable speed controller makes a lot more sense from a manufacturing standpoint than multiple controllers depending on source.   But charge rates are still going to be limited by the max rating on the wires and breakers in the owner's house.

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