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Found 10 results

  1. Subcompact crossovers are the hot thing at the moment and automakers are trying to make their models stand out. Whether it is using sleek styling, sporty driving dynamics, or value for money, every automaker is trying their best to get their vehicle noticed. For Fiat Chrysler Automobiles, they’re going for a two-prong attack in the class with models from Fiat and Jeep. The Jeep Renegade is aimed at those who want a subcompact that can tackle a trail, and the Fiat 500X provides some chicness for the class. We spent some time in both models to see if they can make some end roads in this growing class. While the 500X and Renegade may share a fair amount of mechanicals, the design of the two is worlds apart. The Renegade is classic Jeep with a square body, seven-slot grille, and a set of large headlights. The Renegade also features a fair number of Easter eggs throughout the exterior. The head and taillights feature little Jeep grille-and-headlights logos, and a small Willys MB on the bottom of the windshield. This is basically the vehicle equivalent of a hidden object puzzle you might have done back in school. Remember the first commercial for the Fiat 500X where a blue pill falls into the fuel filler of a standard 500. The owner turns around and somehow his vehicle has engorged into something bigger. That’s how you can summarize the design of the 500X. Compared to your standard 500, the 500X is 28.6 inches longer and 15.6 inches wider. A lot of the design traits from the 500 such as the round headlights, long chrome bar holding the emblem, and rectangular taillights are present on this crossover. Moving inside, the Renegade takes some inspiration from the Wrangler with a rugged dash design and a grab bar for the passenger. Higher trims such as our Limited tester feature a decent amount of soft-touch materials. Like the exterior, the Renegade’s interior has Easter eggs strewn about. The tachometer with has a splash of mud to illustrate the redline, a seven-slot grille design for the speaker grilles, and the frame around the radio having ‘Since 1941’ stamped. The only complaint we have with the Renegade’s dash is the placement of the climate controls. They are mounted a bit too low to reach easily. The 500X’s interior is Fiat’s best effort to date. The overall look has some traits of the standard 500 such as a retro design for the dash. But where the 500X stands out is in the material choices. Fiat went all out with adding soft-touch materials on the dash and door panels to help make the model feel very premium. Our Trekking Plus tester came upholstered in brown leather that added a touch of class that’s nonexistent in other competitors. Both models offer plenty of head and legroom for passengers sitting up front. In the back, headroom is decent for most passengers even with the optional sunroof fitted. Legroom ranges from decent for most folks to almost nonexistent depending on how tall the person sitting up front is. The seats themselves are lacking sufficient support for long trips. If cargo capacity is a priority, then consider the Renegade as it offers 18.5 cubic feet with the rear seats up. The 500X is towards the bottom of the class with only 12.2 cubic feet mostly due to the design of the vehicle. For your infotainment needs, Fiat and Jeep offer a lineup of Uconnect systems from three to 6.5 inches. Our test vehicles featured the optional 6.5-inch system. Uconnect is still one of the easiest systems to use thanks to a simple interface and very fast performance. We hope FCA considers adding Apple CarPlay and Android Auto compatibility in the future. In terms of engines, both the 500X and Renegade come standard with a turbocharged 1.4L with 160 horsepower. The downside to this engine is that it is only available with a six-speed manual. If you want an automatic, then you’ll need to get the engine found under the hood of our test models; a 2.4L four-cylinder with 180 horsepower and 175 pound-feet of torque. We’re not fans of the 2.4L in the any of the FCA vehicles we have driven and this trend continues with the 500X and Renegade. Leaving a stop, there is plenty of oomph to get up to speed in urban environments. Out on the rural roads and highways, the 2.4L struggles to get up to speed at a decent clip. Not helping matters is the engine sounding unrefined. The engine noise during hard acceleration could actually drown out the radio. The one bright spot for the powertrain is the nine-speed automatic. This transmission has been a sore point in a number of FCA vehicles for sluggish shifting and not feeling refined. With the 500X and Renegade, it seems FCA has been able to fix many of the wrongs of the nine-speed. Gear changes are much faster and smoother than in previous models. Both models can be equipped with either front-wheel or all-wheel drive. Both models came equipped with all-wheel drive. This system primarily works in front-wheel drive to help improve fuel economy. But if the system detects slip, it will hook up the rear axle and start sending power for better traction. The Renegade has the more advanced all-wheel drive system known as Jeep Active Drive. This system gives the driver the choice of various drive modes (Auto, Snow, Sand, and Mud) that adjusts the all-wheel drive, steering, and transmission to provide the best settings for the conditions at hand. There’s also a 4WD lock that splits power 50:50 to provide added traction. Thanks to a freak snow storm in April, I was able to put the system to the test. Driving on some snowy roads, the system was able to keep the Renegade moving without the tires spinning. The Renegade Trailhawk takes the system a step further with Active Drive Low. As the name suggests, this system features low range via a two-speed transfer case. This allows the Trailhawk to tackle more difficult obstacles such as rocks. Fuel economy is terrible for the class. The Fiat 500X is rated at 21 City/30 Highway/24 Combined. The Renegade matches the 500X in city and combined fuel figures but is only rated at 29 for the highway. Our average for the week was a very disappointing 22.1 MPG in both vehicles. This is a figure you would expect in a larger crossover, not a subcompact. The ride in both vehicles is on the firm and harsh side. You’ll be able to tell how bad the roads around you are as bumps and road imperfections are transmitted to the seats. Interestingly, both the 500X and Renegade are quite fun around corners. The vehicles feel agile and the steering has some decent weight. But as the Mazda CX-3 has shown, you can have excellent handling characteristics and a decent ride in a crossover. On the highway, the Renegade is the noisier of the two with a large amount of wind noise coming inside. As for pricing, the 500X and Renegade get off to a good start. The Renegade starts at $17,995 and the 500X comes in at $20,000. Where it falls apart comes in the higher trims. Our two testers had price tags of just under $32,000 - $31,695 for the Renegade Limited and $31,800 for the 500X Trekking Plus. For that same amount of money, you can get into a well-equipped or even a loaded compact crossover. Neither one of these models is worth their high price tags. The subcompact crossover class has become a hotly contested class in only a couple of years and you have to show up with your a-game if you want to make an impact. In the case the 500X and Renegade, FCA dropped the ball. The larger four-cylinder engine should be shown the door for its issues in terms of refinement and fuel economy. The ride characteristics need a rethink and the value for money argument is tough when dealing with the higher trim models. This is very disappointing as the two models have some characteristics that should put them a bit higher in the class. The Fiat 500X’s interior looks and feels like something you would find in a luxury model. The Jeep Renegade can go into places that other subcompact crossovers not even dare try thanks to a clever all-wheel drive system and Jeep’s off-road know-how. But these positive points cannot overcome the numerous issues both of the vehicles have. It would be best to avoid them. Cheers: Off-Road Ability (Renegade), Interior Styling and Features (500X), Nine-Speed Automatic Is Much Better Jeers: 2.4L Is Terrible, Rough Ride, Pricing for Higher Trims Disclaimer: FCA Provided the 500X and Renegade; Insurance, and One Tank of Gas Year: 2016 Make: Fiat Model: 500X Trim: Trekking Plus AWD Engine: 2.4L Multi-Air Four-Cylinder Driveline: Nine-Speed Automatic, All-Wheel Drive Horsepower @ RPM: 180 @ 6,400 Torque @ RPM: 175 @ 3,900 Fuel Economy: City/Highway/Combined - 21/30/24 Curb Weight: 3,278 lbs Location of Manufacture: Melfi, Italy Base Price: $29,000 As Tested Price: $31,800 (Includes $900.00 Destination Charge) Options: Trekking Plus Collection 1 - $1,900 Year: 2016 Make: Jeep Model: Renegade Trim: Limited 4X4 Engine: 2.4L Multi-Air Four-Cylinder Driveline: Nine-Speed Automatic, All-Wheel Drive Horsepower @ RPM: 180 @ 6,400 Torque @ RPM: 175 @ 3,900 Fuel Economy: City/Highway/Combined - 21/29/24 Curb Weight: 3,348 lbs Location of Manufacture: Melfi, Italy Base Price: $26,995 As Tested Price: $31,695 (Includes $995.00 Destination Charge) Options: 6.5-inch Navigation Group with Uconnect - $1,245 Advanced Technology Group - $995 Beats Premium Audio System - $695 Safety and Security Group - $645 Passive Entry Keyless Enter n' Go Package - $125
  2. Subcompact crossovers are the hot thing at the moment and automakers are trying to make their models stand out. Whether it is using sleek styling, sporty driving dynamics, or value for money, every automaker is trying their best to get their vehicle noticed. For Fiat Chrysler Automobiles, they’re going for a two-prong attack in the class with models from Fiat and Jeep. The Jeep Renegade is aimed at those who want a subcompact that can tackle a trail, and the Fiat 500X provides some chicness for the class. We spent some time in both models to see if they can make some end roads in this growing class. While the 500X and Renegade may share a fair amount of mechanicals, the design of the two is worlds apart. The Renegade is classic Jeep with a square body, seven-slot grille, and a set of large headlights. The Renegade also features a fair number of Easter eggs throughout the exterior. The head and taillights feature little Jeep grille-and-headlights logos, and a small Willys MB on the bottom of the windshield. This is basically the vehicle equivalent of a hidden object puzzle you might have done back in school. Remember the first commercial for the Fiat 500X where a blue pill falls into the fuel filler of a standard 500. The owner turns around and somehow his vehicle has engorged into something bigger. That’s how you can summarize the design of the 500X. Compared to your standard 500, the 500X is 28.6 inches longer and 15.6 inches wider. A lot of the design traits from the 500 such as the round headlights, long chrome bar holding the emblem, and rectangular taillights are present on this crossover. Moving inside, the Renegade takes some inspiration from the Wrangler with a rugged dash design and a grab bar for the passenger. Higher trims such as our Limited tester feature a decent amount of soft-touch materials. Like the exterior, the Renegade’s interior has Easter eggs strewn about. The tachometer with has a splash of mud to illustrate the redline, a seven-slot grille design for the speaker grilles, and the frame around the radio having ‘Since 1941’ stamped. The only complaint we have with the Renegade’s dash is the placement of the climate controls. They are mounted a bit too low to reach easily. The 500X’s interior is Fiat’s best effort to date. The overall look has some traits of the standard 500 such as a retro design for the dash. But where the 500X stands out is in the material choices. Fiat went all out with adding soft-touch materials on the dash and door panels to help make the model feel very premium. Our Trekking Plus tester came upholstered in brown leather that added a touch of class that’s nonexistent in other competitors. Both models offer plenty of head and legroom for passengers sitting up front. In the back, headroom is decent for most passengers even with the optional sunroof fitted. Legroom ranges from decent for most folks to almost nonexistent depending on how tall the person sitting up front is. The seats themselves are lacking sufficient support for long trips. If cargo capacity is a priority, then consider the Renegade as it offers 18.5 cubic feet with the rear seats up. The 500X is towards the bottom of the class with only 12.2 cubic feet mostly due to the design of the vehicle. For your infotainment needs, Fiat and Jeep offer a lineup of Uconnect systems from three to 6.5 inches. Our test vehicles featured the optional 6.5-inch system. Uconnect is still one of the easiest systems to use thanks to a simple interface and very fast performance. We hope FCA considers adding Apple CarPlay and Android Auto compatibility in the future. In terms of engines, both the 500X and Renegade come standard with a turbocharged 1.4L with 160 horsepower. The downside to this engine is that it is only available with a six-speed manual. If you want an automatic, then you’ll need to get the engine found under the hood of our test models; a 2.4L four-cylinder with 180 horsepower and 175 pound-feet of torque. We’re not fans of the 2.4L in the any of the FCA vehicles we have driven and this trend continues with the 500X and Renegade. Leaving a stop, there is plenty of oomph to get up to speed in urban environments. Out on the rural roads and highways, the 2.4L struggles to get up to speed at a decent clip. Not helping matters is the engine sounding unrefined. The engine noise during hard acceleration could actually drown out the radio. The one bright spot for the powertrain is the nine-speed automatic. This transmission has been a sore point in a number of FCA vehicles for sluggish shifting and not feeling refined. With the 500X and Renegade, it seems FCA has been able to fix many of the wrongs of the nine-speed. Gear changes are much faster and smoother than in previous models. Both models can be equipped with either front-wheel or all-wheel drive. Both models came equipped with all-wheel drive. This system primarily works in front-wheel drive to help improve fuel economy. But if the system detects slip, it will hook up the rear axle and start sending power for better traction. The Renegade has the more advanced all-wheel drive system known as Jeep Active Drive. This system gives the driver the choice of various drive modes (Auto, Snow, Sand, and Mud) that adjusts the all-wheel drive, steering, and transmission to provide the best settings for the conditions at hand. There’s also a 4WD lock that splits power 50:50 to provide added traction. Thanks to a freak snow storm in April, I was able to put the system to the test. Driving on some snowy roads, the system was able to keep the Renegade moving without the tires spinning. The Renegade Trailhawk takes the system a step further with Active Drive Low. As the name suggests, this system features low range via a two-speed transfer case. This allows the Trailhawk to tackle more difficult obstacles such as rocks. Fuel economy is terrible for the class. The Fiat 500X is rated at 21 City/30 Highway/24 Combined. The Renegade matches the 500X in city and combined fuel figures but is only rated at 29 for the highway. Our average for the week was a very disappointing 22.1 MPG in both vehicles. This is a figure you would expect in a larger crossover, not a subcompact. The ride in both vehicles is on the firm and harsh side. You’ll be able to tell how bad the roads around you are as bumps and road imperfections are transmitted to the seats. Interestingly, both the 500X and Renegade are quite fun around corners. The vehicles feel agile and the steering has some decent weight. But as the Mazda CX-3 has shown, you can have excellent handling characteristics and a decent ride in a crossover. On the highway, the Renegade is the noisier of the two with a large amount of wind noise coming inside. As for pricing, the 500X and Renegade get off to a good start. The Renegade starts at $17,995 and the 500X comes in at $20,000. Where it falls apart comes in the higher trims. Our two testers had price tags of just under $32,000 - $31,695 for the Renegade Limited and $31,800 for the 500X Trekking Plus. For that same amount of money, you can get into a well-equipped or even a loaded compact crossover. Neither one of these models is worth their high price tags. The subcompact crossover class has become a hotly contested class in only a couple of years and you have to show up with your a-game if you want to make an impact. In the case the 500X and Renegade, FCA dropped the ball. The larger four-cylinder engine should be shown the door for its issues in terms of refinement and fuel economy. The ride characteristics need a rethink and the value for money argument is tough when dealing with the higher trim models. This is very disappointing as the two models have some characteristics that should put them a bit higher in the class. The Fiat 500X’s interior looks and feels like something you would find in a luxury model. The Jeep Renegade can go into places that other subcompact crossovers not even dare try thanks to a clever all-wheel drive system and Jeep’s off-road know-how. But these positive points cannot overcome the numerous issues both of the vehicles have. It would be best to avoid them. Cheers: Off-Road Ability (Renegade), Interior Styling and Features (500X), Nine-Speed Automatic Is Much Better Jeers: 2.4L Is Terrible, Rough Ride, Pricing for Higher Trims Disclaimer: FCA Provided the 500X and Renegade; Insurance, and One Tank of Gas Year: 2016 Make: Fiat Model: 500X Trim: Trekking Plus AWD Engine: 2.4L Multi-Air Four-Cylinder Driveline: Nine-Speed Automatic, All-Wheel Drive Horsepower @ RPM: 180 @ 6,400 Torque @ RPM: 175 @ 3,900 Fuel Economy: City/Highway/Combined - 21/30/24 Curb Weight: 3,278 lbs Location of Manufacture: Melfi, Italy Base Price: $29,000 As Tested Price: $31,800 (Includes $900.00 Destination Charge) Options: Trekking Plus Collection 1 - $1,900 Year: 2016 Make: Jeep Model: Renegade Trim: Limited 4X4 Engine: 2.4L Multi-Air Four-Cylinder Driveline: Nine-Speed Automatic, All-Wheel Drive Horsepower @ RPM: 180 @ 6,400 Torque @ RPM: 175 @ 3,900 Fuel Economy: City/Highway/Combined - 21/29/24 Curb Weight: 3,348 lbs Location of Manufacture: Melfi, Italy Base Price: $26,995 As Tested Price: $31,695 (Includes $995.00 Destination Charge) Options: 6.5-inch Navigation Group with Uconnect - $1,245 Advanced Technology Group - $995 Beats Premium Audio System - $695 Safety and Security Group - $645 Passive Entry Keyless Enter n' Go Package - $125 View full article
  3. Fiat's performance arm, Abarth, looks to be working their magic on the Fiat 500X. Motor Trend got their hands on some new spy shots of a 500X mule sporting some interesting hardware. First off, the 500X is riding on some very unique wheels. If you're wondering why they look familiar, this same wheel design has been used on various Alfa Romeo models. Behind the wheels are a set of red-painted calipers and larger discs. The big giveaway is around back where there are two exhaust tips. As we reported last summer, the 500X could get the turbocharged 1.7L four-cylinder from the Alfa Romeo 4C. It is unclear if it will retain the 237 horsepower rating found in the 4C or be slightly detuned. All-wheel drive is expected to be standard. Abarth will also make tweaks to the chassis and suspension. No word as to when Fiat will revealed the 500X Abarth. Source: Motor Trend View full article
  4. Fiat's performance arm, Abarth, looks to be working their magic on the Fiat 500X. Motor Trend got their hands on some new spy shots of a 500X mule sporting some interesting hardware. First off, the 500X is riding on some very unique wheels. If you're wondering why they look familiar, this same wheel design has been used on various Alfa Romeo models. Behind the wheels are a set of red-painted calipers and larger discs. The big giveaway is around back where there are two exhaust tips. As we reported last summer, the 500X could get the turbocharged 1.7L four-cylinder from the Alfa Romeo 4C. It is unclear if it will retain the 237 horsepower rating found in the 4C or be slightly detuned. All-wheel drive is expected to be standard. Abarth will also make tweaks to the chassis and suspension. No word as to when Fiat will revealed the 500X Abarth. Source: Motor Trend
  5. Fiat's performance arm, Abarth is currently deciding what vehicle they should tackle next. We have reported that Abarth will be working on hotted-up version of Fiat's upcoming roadster, but they have their sights set on other models as well. “Besides the 124 and 500, we are thinking about an all-new addition to the line-up. The 500X is one of the options being considered,” said Alfredo Altavilla, Fiat Chrysler Group chief operating officer to Auto Express. Now if Fiat does give Abarth the green light to do a performance-oriented version of the 500X, it could borrow the turbocharged four-cylinder from the Alfa Romeo 4C. It would likely be detuned to produce somewhere around 200 horsepower. That puts it in the league of the Mini Countryman JCW (208 horsepower) and Nissan Juke Nismo (215 for the front-wheel drive model, 211 for the all-wheel drive). Source: Auto Express
  6. Fiat's performance arm, Abarth is currently deciding what vehicle they should tackle next. We have reported that Abarth will be working on hotted-up version of Fiat's upcoming roadster, but they have their sights set on other models as well. “Besides the 124 and 500, we are thinking about an all-new addition to the line-up. The 500X is one of the options being considered,” said Alfredo Altavilla, Fiat Chrysler Group chief operating officer to Auto Express. Now if Fiat does give Abarth the green light to do a performance-oriented version of the 500X, it could borrow the turbocharged four-cylinder from the Alfa Romeo 4C. It would likely be detuned to produce somewhere around 200 horsepower. That puts it in the league of the Mini Countryman JCW (208 horsepower) and Nissan Juke Nismo (215 for the front-wheel drive model, 211 for the all-wheel drive). Source: Auto Express View full article
  7. Today, Fiat announced pricing for their latest member of the U.S. lineup. The 500X crossover when it arrives at dealers in the second quarter of 2015 will have a price of $20,900 (includes destination) for the base Pop model. The rest of 500X lineup pricing follows, Easy: $23,200 Trekking: $24,000 Lounge: $25,750 Trekking Plus: $28,000 Engines for the 500X include the turbocharged 1.4L four-cylinder with 160 horsepower and 184 pound-feet of torque or a 2.4L four-cylinder with 180 horsepower and 175 pound-feet of torque. All-wheel drive is available on the Easy through Trekking Plus models for an additional $1,900. Source: Fiat Press Release is on Page 2 Customers Can Now Configure Their All-new Fiat 500X Crossover, Starting at $20,000 MSRP U.S. customers can now configure their 2016 Fiat 500X Pricing for the all-new crossover begins at $20,000 MSRP The latest addition to the FIAT lineup, the Fiat 500X offers an available advanced all-wheel-drive system, functionality and an array of comfort, convenience, and safety and security features The 2016 Fiat 500X will arrive in FIAT studios in the second quarter of 2015 February 1, 2015 , Auburn Hills, Mich. - On the heels of the FIAT brand’s return to Super Bowl advertising, FIAT fans can now configure the 2016 Fiat 500X at www.fiatusa.com. Pricing for the all-new crossover, which will arrive in the U.S. market in the second quarter of 2015, starts at $20,000 MSRP. “The Fiat 500X is the next step of FIAT expansion in the North American market,” said Jason Stoicevich, Head of FIAT Brand North America, FCA US LLC. “Personalization is a big part of who we are as a brand, so we are giving our customers a chance to jump-start the process and customize a Fiat 500X that fits their own needs and personality. Also, FIAT fans can now visit a studio to reserve a vehicle and be one of the first to own the Italian-made Fiat 500X.” The all-new Fiat 500X combines iconic Italian style with functionality, performance and available all-wheel-drive confidence. The vehicle is available in five trim levels. The Street series models, including the Pop, Easy and Lounge, feature the refined Italian style and design of the FIAT brand with a more urban appearance. The Trekking and Trekking Plus models feature a more aggressive and athletic look with unique front and rear fascia designs and satin silver accents. The base Manufacturer’s Suggested Retail Price (MSRP) for the 2016 Fiat 500X starts at $20,000 (excluding a destination charge of $900, taxes, title and registration fees): Pop: $20,000 Easy: $22,300 Trekking: $23,100 Lounge: $24,850 Trekking Plus: $27,100 The Easy, Trekking, Lounge and Trekking Plus models are all available with the Fiat 500X’s advanced all-wheel-drive system for an additional $1,900. About the 2016 Fiat 500X In the United States, the all-new Fiat 500X is available with the fuel-efficient 1.4-liter MultiAir Turbo engine paired with a six-speed manual transmission, with an output of 160 horsepower and 184 lb.-ft. of torque. The available 2.4-liter Tigershark MultiAir2 engine produces 180 horsepower and 175 lb.-ft. of torque, and is paired exclusively to a nine-speed automatic transmission on all-wheel-drive and front-wheel-drive models. A disconnecting rear axle allows for reduced parasitic loss when available all-wheel-drive capability is not needed, improving fuel efficiency. The Dynamic Selector system allows the driver to choose from three modes (Auto, Sport and Traction +) for the most suitable vehicle configuration for different driving conditions. The 2016 Fiat 500X offers up to 70 standard and available safety and security features. Available features include Forward Collision Warning-Plus with full stop, LaneSense Lane Departure Warning-Plus, Blind-spot Monitoring and Rear Cross Path detection. Electronic stability control (ESC) with Hill-start Assist and electronic roll mitigation is standard on all models, as are seven air bags. Loaded with technology and convenience, the Fiat 500X is available with features like Uconnect 6.5 radio with a 6.5-inch high-resolution touchscreen and navigation, Bluetooth streaming audio, Uconnect Access Via Mobile, a 3.5-inch color thin-film transistor (TFT) cluster display, Keyless Enter ‘n Go with remote start, and heated front seats and steering wheel. The all-new Fiat 500X is crafted at the Melfi plant in Italy.
  8. Today, Fiat announced pricing for their latest member of the U.S. lineup. The 500X crossover when it arrives at dealers in the second quarter of 2015 will have a price of $20,900 (includes destination) for the base Pop model. The rest of 500X lineup pricing follows, Easy: $23,200 Trekking: $24,000 Lounge: $25,750 Trekking Plus: $28,000 Engines for the 500X include the turbocharged 1.4L four-cylinder with 160 horsepower and 184 pound-feet of torque or a 2.4L four-cylinder with 180 horsepower and 175 pound-feet of torque. All-wheel drive is available on the Easy through Trekking Plus models for an additional $1,900. Source: Fiat Press Release is on Page 2 Customers Can Now Configure Their All-new Fiat 500X Crossover, Starting at $20,000 MSRP U.S. customers can now configure their 2016 Fiat 500X Pricing for the all-new crossover begins at $20,000 MSRP The latest addition to the FIAT lineup, the Fiat 500X offers an available advanced all-wheel-drive system, functionality and an array of comfort, convenience, and safety and security features The 2016 Fiat 500X will arrive in FIAT studios in the second quarter of 2015 February 1, 2015 , Auburn Hills, Mich. - On the heels of the FIAT brand’s return to Super Bowl advertising, FIAT fans can now configure the 2016 Fiat 500X at www.fiatusa.com. Pricing for the all-new crossover, which will arrive in the U.S. market in the second quarter of 2015, starts at $20,000 MSRP. “The Fiat 500X is the next step of FIAT expansion in the North American market,” said Jason Stoicevich, Head of FIAT Brand North America, FCA US LLC. “Personalization is a big part of who we are as a brand, so we are giving our customers a chance to jump-start the process and customize a Fiat 500X that fits their own needs and personality. Also, FIAT fans can now visit a studio to reserve a vehicle and be one of the first to own the Italian-made Fiat 500X.” The all-new Fiat 500X combines iconic Italian style with functionality, performance and available all-wheel-drive confidence. The vehicle is available in five trim levels. The Street series models, including the Pop, Easy and Lounge, feature the refined Italian style and design of the FIAT brand with a more urban appearance. The Trekking and Trekking Plus models feature a more aggressive and athletic look with unique front and rear fascia designs and satin silver accents. The base Manufacturer’s Suggested Retail Price (MSRP) for the 2016 Fiat 500X starts at $20,000 (excluding a destination charge of $900, taxes, title and registration fees): Pop: $20,000 Easy: $22,300 Trekking: $23,100 Lounge: $24,850 Trekking Plus: $27,100 The Easy, Trekking, Lounge and Trekking Plus models are all available with the Fiat 500X’s advanced all-wheel-drive system for an additional $1,900. About the 2016 Fiat 500X In the United States, the all-new Fiat 500X is available with the fuel-efficient 1.4-liter MultiAir Turbo engine paired with a six-speed manual transmission, with an output of 160 horsepower and 184 lb.-ft. of torque. The available 2.4-liter Tigershark MultiAir2 engine produces 180 horsepower and 175 lb.-ft. of torque, and is paired exclusively to a nine-speed automatic transmission on all-wheel-drive and front-wheel-drive models. A disconnecting rear axle allows for reduced parasitic loss when available all-wheel-drive capability is not needed, improving fuel efficiency. The Dynamic Selector system allows the driver to choose from three modes (Auto, Sport and Traction +) for the most suitable vehicle configuration for different driving conditions. The 2016 Fiat 500X offers up to 70 standard and available safety and security features. Available features include Forward Collision Warning-Plus with full stop, LaneSense Lane Departure Warning-Plus, Blind-spot Monitoring and Rear Cross Path detection. Electronic stability control (ESC) with Hill-start Assist and electronic roll mitigation is standard on all models, as are seven air bags. Loaded with technology and convenience, the Fiat 500X is available with features like Uconnect 6.5 radio with a 6.5-inch high-resolution touchscreen and navigation, Bluetooth streaming audio, Uconnect Access Via Mobile, a 3.5-inch color thin-film transistor (TFT) cluster display, Keyless Enter ‘n Go with remote start, and heated front seats and steering wheel. The all-new Fiat 500X is crafted at the Melfi plant in Italy. View full article
  9. William Maley Staff Writer - CheersandGears.com July 6, 2012 During the recent press launch of the new Fiat 500L, Fiat previewed a new member of the 500 family called the 500X. The 500X is a crossover and will take the place of Fiat Sedici (Suzuki SX4 in Fiat clothing). Styling is a mix of hatchback and SUV cues and come with the choice of front-wheel and all-wheel-drive. The 500X will be the longest model in the 500 lineup, measuring around 13.7 feet. The 500X is also the likely canditate for the compact Jeep that we've been reporting for the past year. The major difference between the the two will be the Jeep will have a trail-rated model. The 500X will go into production next year, with the Jeep following sometime in 2014. Source: Autoweek William Maley is a staff writer for Cheers & Gears. He can be reached at william.maley@cheersandgears.com or you can follow him on twitter at @realmudmonster.
  10. William Maley Staff Writer - CheersandGears.com July 6, 2012 During the recent press launch of the new Fiat 500L, Fiat previewed a new member of the 500 family called the 500X. The 500X is a crossover and will take the place of Fiat Sedici (Suzuki SX4 in Fiat clothing). Styling is a mix of hatchback and SUV cues and come with the choice of front-wheel and all-wheel-drive. The 500X will be the longest model in the 500 lineup, measuring around 13.7 feet. The 500X is also the likely canditate for the compact Jeep that we've been reporting for the past year. The major difference between the the two will be the Jeep will have a trail-rated model. The 500X will go into production next year, with the Jeep following sometime in 2014. Source: Autoweek William Maley is a staff writer for Cheers & Gears. He can be reached at william.maley@cheersandgears.com or you can follow him on twitter at @realmudmonster. View full article

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