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Found 10 results

  1. There has been a common theme for most of the Cadillac vehicles I have reviewed over the past few years. They are always so close to being up there with the best, but there is one thing or trait that knocks them down. Such examples include interior appointments that don’t match up with the price being asked, confusing infotainment systems, and engines that don’t quite match up with the image being portrayed. This was floating around in the back of my head when a 2017 Cadillac CT6 Platinum rolled up onto my driveway. This is an important model for Cadillac as it is taking on the likes of the BMW 7-Series and Mercedes-Benz S-Class. The little things can make or break a sedan in the class. Seeing the Cadillac CT6 for the first time at Detroit Auto Show a few years ago, I wasn’t too impressed. The toned-down Art & Science design made me feel that the CT6 blended in with other luxury sedans. But after spending a bit of time with this CT6, I grew to like the design. Yes, the design language has lost some edge found on other Cadillacs, but there is still some sharpness with hard angles and bold lines. The Platinum adds some touches that really bring out the CT6’s shape. A chrome grille helps give the model a more imposing front end and a set of optional 20-inch wheels finished in ‘Midnight Silver’ do an excellent job of filling in the wheel wells. If there has been a consistent weak point to Cadillac’s recent models, it has to be interior. On first glance, it seems they have it nailed down with a modern design and quality materials. But when you sit inside and begin to take a closer look, that illusion begins to go away. A fair amount of the materials used doesn't quite match up the luxury aura being presented such as the sheet piano black trim used for touch-sensitive controls on a number of Cadillac models. But the brand is improving as we noted in our XT5 review, and the CT6 is much the same. There is a noticeable step-up in terms of materials such as fine leather, carbon fiber accents, and wood trim. This comes wrapped in a handsomely-designed dashboard. There are some areas Cadillac still needs to do some work on such as the plasticity controls for the climate control system. The front seats are a treat to sit in thanks to the right amount of cushioning and support. The Platinum trim gets 20-way power seats for both the driver and passenger to help dial in the right position. Those sitting in the back will be pleased to find generous head and legroom. As added bonus, you can order heated and ventilated seats, power adjustments, and a rear entertainment system to make the back more luxurious. The only downside to sitting in the back is that the CT6 isn’t long enough to take full advantage of the power adjustments. I felt somewhat cramped when I had the back seat fully reclined and my legs touching the back of the front seat. A few more inches in the wheelbase would fix this issue. Cadillac’s CUE system has undergone some changes for the CT6. Most of the touch-sensitive buttons have either been dropped or replaced with actual, physical buttons. Being able to press a button or flick a switch to change a setting is a welcome change and less frustrating than the touch-sensitive controls. It would have been nice if Cadillac swapped the touch-sensitive volume strip for an actual knob, but at least you can adjust it via the steering wheel controls. Cadillac also added a touchpad controller (think Lexus’ Remote Touch system) for CUE. It is a nice idea on paper, but the execution shows Cadillac needs to do a bit more work. The touchpad is hypersensitive and tends to overshoot from where you want the cursor. You’re better off using the touchscreen. As for CUE itself, the system comes with a faster processor, some tweaks to the interface, and Apple CarPlay and Android Auto compatibility. These changes make CUE less frustrating to use on a daily basis. There are three engines on offer for the CT6. The base is a turbocharged 2.0L four-cylinder, followed by a 3.6L V6. Our Platinum tester featured the big dog; a twin-turbo 3.0L V6 offering 404 horsepower and 400 pound-feet of torque (@ 2,500 - 5,100 rpm) Power goes to all four wheels via an eight-speed automatic. Performance for the twin-turbo six may not have same exuberance as V8s found in competitors, but it isn’t a slouch. This engine rockets the CT6 at a surprising rate of speed. Those who have timed the vehicle say it will hit 60 mph in around five seconds and we would believe it. Torque is abundant throughout rev range, meaning you should have no issue trying to merge on the freeway or make a pass. The eight-speed automatic has the right characteristics you want in a flagship sedan, smooth and unobtrusive shifts. EPA fuel economy figures for the CT6 3.0TT stand at 18 City/26 Highway/21 Combined. Our average for the week landed around 22 mpg in mostly city driving. Describing a sedan that measures 204 inches in overall length as ‘agile’ seems very disingenuous. But the CT6 is that. Drive it around a turn and the CT6 feels like a smaller sedan with nimble manners and well-controlled body motions. Some credit has to go Active Chassis package that comes standard on the Platinum and comes with the excellent Magnetic Ride Control system and rear-wheel steering. But most buyers who tend to buy a sedan of this caliber don’t really care about handling. Ride quality is king here and that’s where the CT6 begins to falter. When equipped with the Magnetic Ride Control system, the ride is just a touch too firm. You will feel more bumps in this than some of the CT6’s competition. It would be nice if Cadillac could offer an air suspension for those who want comfort. On the upside, road and wind noise are kept to near silent levels. It seems somewhat surprising to call the CT6 Platinum a great value, but it actually is. The Platinum 3.0TT begins at $87,495 and our test car with a few options (20-inch wheels, white paint, and spoiler) comes in at $91,580. Considering you have to spend a fair amount more on competitors to match the level of equipment on offer, the CT6 Platinum is quite the steal. Most of Cadillac’s vehicles have fallen into the cliche of ‘being so close, yet so far’ due to some odd or boneheaded decision. But the CT6 is the first Cadillac that has avoided this. It feels like Cadillac is starting to feel comfortable in this new identity that it has been putting out there since the mid-2000s, a legitimate competitor to the Germans. The CT6 stands out for a number of reasons; excellent driving dynamics, impressive interior, punchy V6, and being quite the value. There are some niggling issues such as a firm ride and questionable materials, but these can and should be addressed down the road. Whether the CT6 can draw people away from the usual suspects remains to be seen. If Cadillac can take what they have learned from the CT6 and implement them into future models, then we can say something that hasn’t been used in a long time, ‘Standard of the World’. Disclaimer: Cadillac Provided the CT6, Insurance, and One Tank of Gas Year: 2017 Make: Cadillac Model: CT6 Trim: Platinum Engine: Twin-Turbo 3.0L DI DOHC with VVT V6 Driveline: Eight-Speed Automatic, All-Wheel Drive Horsepower @ RPM: 404 @ 5,700 Torque @ RPM: 400 @ 2,500 - 5,100 Fuel Economy: City/Highway/Combined - 18/26/21 Curb Weight: 4,085 lbs Location of Manufacture: Detroit, MI Base Price: $87,495 As Tested Price: $91,580 (Includes $995.00 Destination Charge) Options: 20" Midnight Silver Wheels - $2,095.00 Crystal White Tricoat - $500.00 Spoiler Kit - $495.00
  2. There has been a common theme for most of the Cadillac vehicles I have reviewed over the past few years. They are always so close to being up there with the best, but there is one thing or trait that knocks them down. Such examples include interior appointments that don’t match up with the price being asked, confusing infotainment systems, and engines that don’t quite match up with the image being portrayed. This was floating around in the back of my head when a 2017 Cadillac CT6 Platinum rolled up onto my driveway. This is an important model for Cadillac as it is taking on the likes of the BMW 7-Series and Mercedes-Benz S-Class. The little things can make or break a sedan in the class. Seeing the Cadillac CT6 for the first time at Detroit Auto Show a few years ago, I wasn’t too impressed. The toned-down Art & Science design made me feel that the CT6 blended in with other luxury sedans. But after spending a bit of time with this CT6, I grew to like the design. Yes, the design language has lost some edge found on other Cadillacs, but there is still some sharpness with hard angles and bold lines. The Platinum adds some touches that really bring out the CT6’s shape. A chrome grille helps give the model a more imposing front end and a set of optional 20-inch wheels finished in ‘Midnight Silver’ do an excellent job of filling in the wheel wells. If there has been a consistent weak point to Cadillac’s recent models, it has to be interior. On first glance, it seems they have it nailed down with a modern design and quality materials. But when you sit inside and begin to take a closer look, that illusion begins to go away. A fair amount of the materials used doesn't quite match up the luxury aura being presented such as the sheet piano black trim used for touch-sensitive controls on a number of Cadillac models. But the brand is improving as we noted in our XT5 review, and the CT6 is much the same. There is a noticeable step-up in terms of materials such as fine leather, carbon fiber accents, and wood trim. This comes wrapped in a handsomely-designed dashboard. There are some areas Cadillac still needs to do some work on such as the plasticity controls for the climate control system. The front seats are a treat to sit in thanks to the right amount of cushioning and support. The Platinum trim gets 20-way power seats for both the driver and passenger to help dial in the right position. Those sitting in the back will be pleased to find generous head and legroom. As added bonus, you can order heated and ventilated seats, power adjustments, and a rear entertainment system to make the back more luxurious. The only downside to sitting in the back is that the CT6 isn’t long enough to take full advantage of the power adjustments. I felt somewhat cramped when I had the back seat fully reclined and my legs touching the back of the front seat. A few more inches in the wheelbase would fix this issue. Cadillac’s CUE system has undergone some changes for the CT6. Most of the touch-sensitive buttons have either been dropped or replaced with actual, physical buttons. Being able to press a button or flick a switch to change a setting is a welcome change and less frustrating than the touch-sensitive controls. It would have been nice if Cadillac swapped the touch-sensitive volume strip for an actual knob, but at least you can adjust it via the steering wheel controls. Cadillac also added a touchpad controller (think Lexus’ Remote Touch system) for CUE. It is a nice idea on paper, but the execution shows Cadillac needs to do a bit more work. The touchpad is hypersensitive and tends to overshoot from where you want the cursor. You’re better off using the touchscreen. As for CUE itself, the system comes with a faster processor, some tweaks to the interface, and Apple CarPlay and Android Auto compatibility. These changes make CUE less frustrating to use on a daily basis. There are three engines on offer for the CT6. The base is a turbocharged 2.0L four-cylinder, followed by a 3.6L V6. Our Platinum tester featured the big dog; a twin-turbo 3.0L V6 offering 404 horsepower and 400 pound-feet of torque (@ 2,500 - 5,100 rpm) Power goes to all four wheels via an eight-speed automatic. Performance for the twin-turbo six may not have same exuberance as V8s found in competitors, but it isn’t a slouch. This engine rockets the CT6 at a surprising rate of speed. Those who have timed the vehicle say it will hit 60 mph in around five seconds and we would believe it. Torque is abundant throughout rev range, meaning you should have no issue trying to merge on the freeway or make a pass. The eight-speed automatic has the right characteristics you want in a flagship sedan, smooth and unobtrusive shifts. EPA fuel economy figures for the CT6 3.0TT stand at 18 City/26 Highway/21 Combined. Our average for the week landed around 22 mpg in mostly city driving. Describing a sedan that measures 204 inches in overall length as ‘agile’ seems very disingenuous. But the CT6 is that. Drive it around a turn and the CT6 feels like a smaller sedan with nimble manners and well-controlled body motions. Some credit has to go Active Chassis package that comes standard on the Platinum and comes with the excellent Magnetic Ride Control system and rear-wheel steering. But most buyers who tend to buy a sedan of this caliber don’t really care about handling. Ride quality is king here and that’s where the CT6 begins to falter. When equipped with the Magnetic Ride Control system, the ride is just a touch too firm. You will feel more bumps in this than some of the CT6’s competition. It would be nice if Cadillac could offer an air suspension for those who want comfort. On the upside, road and wind noise are kept to near silent levels. It seems somewhat surprising to call the CT6 Platinum a great value, but it actually is. The Platinum 3.0TT begins at $87,495 and our test car with a few options (20-inch wheels, white paint, and spoiler) comes in at $91,580. Considering you have to spend a fair amount more on competitors to match the level of equipment on offer, the CT6 Platinum is quite the steal. Most of Cadillac’s vehicles have fallen into the cliche of ‘being so close, yet so far’ due to some odd or boneheaded decision. But the CT6 is the first Cadillac that has avoided this. It feels like Cadillac is starting to feel comfortable in this new identity that it has been putting out there since the mid-2000s, a legitimate competitor to the Germans. The CT6 stands out for a number of reasons; excellent driving dynamics, impressive interior, punchy V6, and being quite the value. There are some niggling issues such as a firm ride and questionable materials, but these can and should be addressed down the road. Whether the CT6 can draw people away from the usual suspects remains to be seen. If Cadillac can take what they have learned from the CT6 and implement them into future models, then we can say something that hasn’t been used in a long time, ‘Standard of the World’. Disclaimer: Cadillac Provided the CT6, Insurance, and One Tank of Gas Year: 2017 Make: Cadillac Model: CT6 Trim: Platinum Engine: Twin-Turbo 3.0L DI DOHC with VVT V6 Driveline: Eight-Speed Automatic, All-Wheel Drive Horsepower @ RPM: 404 @ 5,700 Torque @ RPM: 400 @ 2,500 - 5,100 Fuel Economy: City/Highway/Combined - 18/26/21 Curb Weight: 4,085 lbs Location of Manufacture: Detroit, MI Base Price: $87,495 As Tested Price: $91,580 (Includes $995.00 Destination Charge) Options: 20" Midnight Silver Wheels - $2,095.00 Crystal White Tricoat - $500.00 Spoiler Kit - $495.00 View full article
  3. Cadillac has been trying to position itself being as an alternative to German brands with models that offer exemplary handling characteristics and sharp designs. But the brand has the issue of models that don’t quite fit the image being presented. The SRX is the poster child for this. Yes, it had the sharp looks the brand was getting known for. But you wouldn’t call it sporty. It was more along the lines of a Lexus RX where luxury and comfort were the main priorities. Enthusiasts and critics were not pleased with this, but consumers gobbled them up. The SRX for a time was Cadillac’s best-selling model. Now we come to the successor of the SRX, the 2017 XT5. Those who were hoping for a change in the priorities will be disappointed as the XT5 doesn’t mess with the SRX’s recipe. But is that bad thing? Evolution is the impression you get when walking around the XT5. Cadillac’s designers didn’t make any drastic changes to the design profile aside from softening the Art & Science design language. The front now features a comically-large grille and headlights with a strand of LEDs that run into the bumper. Towards the back is an integrated spoiler that extends the roofline, a set of large taillights, and a rear bumper that comes with chrome exhaust ports and a faux skid plate. The XT5 does lose some of the polarizing details that made the SRX stand out, but it still stands out slightly in what is becoming a crowded class. Cadillac has been stepping up its game in terms of their interiors with their new models. Case in point is the XT5. Our top-line Platinum tester featured faux suede, leather, and wood trim on a number of surfaces that make it look and feel quite luxurious. We’re glad to see the removal of the Piano Black panel for the center stack as it looked out of place and was a magnet for fingerprints. One design idea we’re not so keen on is the gear selector. Instead of a lever, Cadillac went with a joystick controller to engage the various gears. The controller isn’t intuitive as you’ll find yourself going into the wrong gear or not going into one at all on a somewhat regular basis. You will get the hang of it after a bit, but you can’t help but wonder why Cadillac decided to change this in the first place. The leather used for the seats feel quite supple and help fix the issue of uncomfortable seats in the SRX. Interior space has grown, thanks to a two-inch increase in the wheelbase. Rear legroom has grown 3.2 inches and it allows anyone sitting back there to stretch out. Headroom is still slightly tight thanks in part to our tester coming with the optional panoramic sunroof. But this can be alleviated by recalling the rear seat slightly. Cargo space in smack dab in the middle - 30 cubic feet with the rear seats up and 63 cubic feet when folded. Cadillac User Interface (CUE) has been one of our least favorite infotainment systems to use since it was introduced a few years ago. The litany of problems ranging from a touch sensitive buttons not responding to inputs to the system crashing have dragged Cadillac down. But the system has been getting a number of changes and updates over the past few years. For starters, Cadillac has removed most of the touch-sensitive buttons from the system. Being able to press an actual button to turn on the heated/ventilated seats or adjust the temperature is really nice. It is a shame Cadillac didn’t bring back an actual volume knob for CUE - the touch-sensitive strip is still there. But at least there are volume controls on the steering wheel that allow you to avoid it. The system itself has been overhauled with a faster processor and a slightly improved interface. The changes make a difference as the system is snappier and a little bit easier to understand. If you still find CUE a bit overwhelming, you’ll be happy to know that CUE now features Apple CarPlay and Android Auto integration. Cadillac bucks the trend in the midsize luxury crossover class by only offering one engine - a 3.6L V6 producing 310 horsepower and 271 pound-feet of torque (@ 5,000 rpm). This comes paired with an eight-speed automatic and the choice of front or all-wheel drive. The V6 is the weak link in the XT5. When leaving a stop, it takes a moment for the engine to realize the accelerator pedal has been pressed before it starts working. This is even worse when you’re trying to make a pass as it seems the engine was busy taking a nap before it was hastily woken up. Once the engine is awake, it takes its time to get up to speed. There is a positive to the V6 engine and that is the stop-start system. Unlike some previous systems that are slow to restart the engine or do so in a very rough fashion, Cadillac’s system is quick and smooth when you let off the brake. The eight-speed automatic seems reluctant to downshift at times. We’re guessing this transmission was calibrated for fuel economy. At least the eight-speed automatic delivers smooth shifts. Fuel economy figures for the 2017 Cadillac XT5 all-wheel drive stand at 18 City/26 Highway/21 Combined. Our average fuel economy for the week landed around 22.3 mpg in mostly city driving. One characteristic we liked about the SRX was its comfortable ride. Yes, it flies in the face of Cadillac’s message of beating the German’s at their own handling game. But buyers loved the smoothness on offer. Sadly, the XT5 loses a bit of the smoothness. Despite our tester featuring an adaptive suspension system, the XT5 wasn’t able to fully iron out bumps. Some of this can be attributed to 20-inch wheels fitted to our tester. At least the XT5 keeps road and wind noise out of the interior. Like the SRX, the XT5 isn’t sporty. Body motions are kept in check, but the light weight and nonexistent feel from the steering puts a halt to that idea. An item Cadillac has been touting on the XT5 is the Rear Camera Mirror. Available only on the top-line Platinum, the mirror can stream the view from the rear camera by flicking a switch. We found this to be really helpful when backing out of parking lots as it gave a view that isn’t hindered by the thick rear pillars. Hopefully, Cadillac spreads this feature down to other trims of the XT5. In some respects, the 2017 Cadillac XT5 is a step forward. The model improves on certain parts of the SRX such as a more luxurious and spacious interior, improved CUE system, and sharper looks. But in other respects, Cadillac messed up with the XT5. The 3.6L V6 needs to be shown the door and a new engine that offers better low-end performance to take its place. The loss of the smooth ride that the SRX was known for hurts the XT5 as well. Finally, there is the price. Our XT5 Platinum tester came with an as-tested price of $69,985. It is a nice crossover. But if we’re dropping close $70,000 on a luxury crossover, we can think of a few models that would be ahead of the XT5. It should be noted that the Cadillac XT5 has taken the place of the SRX of being the brand’s best selling model. At the end of 2016, Cadillac moved 39,485 XT5s. But unlike the SRX which we could recommend without hesitation, the XT5 comes with a number of caveats that we cannot do the same. Disclaimer: Cadillac Provided the XT5, Insurance, and One Tank of Gas Year: 2017 Make: Cadillac Model: SRX Trim: Platinum Engine: 3.6L V6 VVT DI Driveline: Nine-Speed Automatic, All-Wheel Drive Horsepower @ RPM: 310 @ 6,700 Torque @ RPM: 271 @ 5,000 Fuel Economy: City/Highway/Combined - 18/26/21 Curb Weight: N/A Location of Manufacture: Spring Hill, TN Base Price: $62,500 As Tested Price: $69,985 (Includes $995.00 Destination Charge) Options: Driver Assist Package - $2,340.00 20-inch Wheels - $2,095.00 Trailering Equipment - $575.00 Black Ice Body Side Moldings - $355.00 Compact Spare Tire - $350.00 Black Ice License Plate Bar - $310.00 Black Roof Rails - $295.00 Black Splash Guards - $170.00
  4. Cadillac has been trying to position itself being as an alternative to German brands with models that offer exemplary handling characteristics and sharp designs. But the brand has the issue of models that don’t quite fit the image being presented. The SRX is the poster child for this. Yes, it had the sharp looks the brand was getting known for. But you wouldn’t call it sporty. It was more along the lines of a Lexus RX where luxury and comfort were the main priorities. Enthusiasts and critics were not pleased with this, but consumers gobbled them up. The SRX for a time was Cadillac’s best-selling model. Now we come to the successor of the SRX, the 2017 XT5. Those who were hoping for a change in the priorities will be disappointed as the XT5 doesn’t mess with the SRX’s recipe. But is that bad thing? Evolution is the impression you get when walking around the XT5. Cadillac’s designers didn’t make any drastic changes to the design profile aside from softening the Art & Science design language. The front now features a comically-large grille and headlights with a strand of LEDs that run into the bumper. Towards the back is an integrated spoiler that extends the roofline, a set of large taillights, and a rear bumper that comes with chrome exhaust ports and a faux skid plate. The XT5 does lose some of the polarizing details that made the SRX stand out, but it still stands out slightly in what is becoming a crowded class. Cadillac has been stepping up its game in terms of their interiors with their new models. Case in point is the XT5. Our top-line Platinum tester featured faux suede, leather, and wood trim on a number of surfaces that make it look and feel quite luxurious. We’re glad to see the removal of the Piano Black panel for the center stack as it looked out of place and was a magnet for fingerprints. One design idea we’re not so keen on is the gear selector. Instead of a lever, Cadillac went with a joystick controller to engage the various gears. The controller isn’t intuitive as you’ll find yourself going into the wrong gear or not going into one at all on a somewhat regular basis. You will get the hang of it after a bit, but you can’t help but wonder why Cadillac decided to change this in the first place. The leather used for the seats feel quite supple and help fix the issue of uncomfortable seats in the SRX. Interior space has grown, thanks to a two-inch increase in the wheelbase. Rear legroom has grown 3.2 inches and it allows anyone sitting back there to stretch out. Headroom is still slightly tight thanks in part to our tester coming with the optional panoramic sunroof. But this can be alleviated by recalling the rear seat slightly. Cargo space in smack dab in the middle - 30 cubic feet with the rear seats up and 63 cubic feet when folded. Cadillac User Interface (CUE) has been one of our least favorite infotainment systems to use since it was introduced a few years ago. The litany of problems ranging from a touch sensitive buttons not responding to inputs to the system crashing have dragged Cadillac down. But the system has been getting a number of changes and updates over the past few years. For starters, Cadillac has removed most of the touch-sensitive buttons from the system. Being able to press an actual button to turn on the heated/ventilated seats or adjust the temperature is really nice. It is a shame Cadillac didn’t bring back an actual volume knob for CUE - the touch-sensitive strip is still there. But at least there are volume controls on the steering wheel that allow you to avoid it. The system itself has been overhauled with a faster processor and a slightly improved interface. The changes make a difference as the system is snappier and a little bit easier to understand. If you still find CUE a bit overwhelming, you’ll be happy to know that CUE now features Apple CarPlay and Android Auto integration. Cadillac bucks the trend in the midsize luxury crossover class by only offering one engine - a 3.6L V6 producing 310 horsepower and 271 pound-feet of torque (@ 5,000 rpm). This comes paired with an eight-speed automatic and the choice of front or all-wheel drive. The V6 is the weak link in the XT5. When leaving a stop, it takes a moment for the engine to realize the accelerator pedal has been pressed before it starts working. This is even worse when you’re trying to make a pass as it seems the engine was busy taking a nap before it was hastily woken up. Once the engine is awake, it takes its time to get up to speed. There is a positive to the V6 engine and that is the stop-start system. Unlike some previous systems that are slow to restart the engine or do so in a very rough fashion, Cadillac’s system is quick and smooth when you let off the brake. The eight-speed automatic seems reluctant to downshift at times. We’re guessing this transmission was calibrated for fuel economy. At least the eight-speed automatic delivers smooth shifts. Fuel economy figures for the 2017 Cadillac XT5 all-wheel drive stand at 18 City/26 Highway/21 Combined. Our average fuel economy for the week landed around 22.3 mpg in mostly city driving. One characteristic we liked about the SRX was its comfortable ride. Yes, it flies in the face of Cadillac’s message of beating the German’s at their own handling game. But buyers loved the smoothness on offer. Sadly, the XT5 loses a bit of the smoothness. Despite our tester featuring an adaptive suspension system, the XT5 wasn’t able to fully iron out bumps. Some of this can be attributed to 20-inch wheels fitted to our tester. At least the XT5 keeps road and wind noise out of the interior. Like the SRX, the XT5 isn’t sporty. Body motions are kept in check, but the light weight and nonexistent feel from the steering puts a halt to that idea. An item Cadillac has been touting on the XT5 is the Rear Camera Mirror. Available only on the top-line Platinum, the mirror can stream the view from the rear camera by flicking a switch. We found this to be really helpful when backing out of parking lots as it gave a view that isn’t hindered by the thick rear pillars. Hopefully, Cadillac spreads this feature down to other trims of the XT5. In some respects, the 2017 Cadillac XT5 is a step forward. The model improves on certain parts of the SRX such as a more luxurious and spacious interior, improved CUE system, and sharper looks. But in other respects, Cadillac messed up with the XT5. The 3.6L V6 needs to be shown the door and a new engine that offers better low-end performance to take its place. The loss of the smooth ride that the SRX was known for hurts the XT5 as well. Finally, there is the price. Our XT5 Platinum tester came with an as-tested price of $69,985. It is a nice crossover. But if we’re dropping close $70,000 on a luxury crossover, we can think of a few models that would be ahead of the XT5. It should be noted that the Cadillac XT5 has taken the place of the SRX of being the brand’s best selling model. At the end of 2016, Cadillac moved 39,485 XT5s. But unlike the SRX which we could recommend without hesitation, the XT5 comes with a number of caveats that we cannot do the same. Disclaimer: Cadillac Provided the XT5, Insurance, and One Tank of Gas Year: 2017 Make: Cadillac Model: SRX Trim: Platinum Engine: 3.6L V6 VVT DI Driveline: Nine-Speed Automatic, All-Wheel Drive Horsepower @ RPM: 310 @ 6,700 Torque @ RPM: 271 @ 5,000 Fuel Economy: City/Highway/Combined - 18/26/21 Curb Weight: N/A Location of Manufacture: Spring Hill, TN Base Price: $62,500 As Tested Price: $69,985 (Includes $995.00 Destination Charge) Options: Driver Assist Package - $2,340.00 20-inch Wheels - $2,095.00 Trailering Equipment - $575.00 Black Ice Body Side Moldings - $355.00 Compact Spare Tire - $350.00 Black Ice License Plate Bar - $310.00 Black Roof Rails - $295.00 Black Splash Guards - $170.00 View full article
  5. Even though the Cadillac Escalade is quite fresh, Cadillac has a number of changes in store for it in the coming year to keep it the thick of the luxury SUV battleground. The big change is the introduction of the Platinum trim for the Escalade. The Platinum trim adds a bit more shine on the exterior with additional chrome trim, twenty-two inch wheels, Cadillac's new crest, and Platinum badges. Inside, the Escalade Platinum gets Nappa semi-aniline leather in a choice of either beige or gray; suede microfiber headliner, heated and cooled seats for the front, eighteen-way power seats, and three screens for rear seat passengers (two seven-inch screens in the headrests, and a nine-inch screen in the center). Other changes for the 2015 model include an eight-speed automatic taking the place of the six-speed, a new two-speed transfer case for four-wheel drive models, Surround View camera system, 4G LTE connectivity, and a hands-free power liftgate. Pricing for the 2015 Escalade will start at $73,965 (includes $995 destination charge), while the new Escalade Platinum model kicks off at $90,270. Source: Cadillac William Maley is a staff writer for Cheers & Gears. He can be reached at william.maley@cheersandgears.comor you can follow him on twitter at @realmudmonster. Press Release is on Page 2 New Platinum Collection, Added Features Elevate Escalade Craftsmanship and Technology Entire SUV line gets 8-Speed transmission, Surround View camera and 4G LTE connectivity DETROIT – Cadillac today announced numerous enhancements to the just-launched 2015 Escalade, including the new range-topping Platinum Collection model launching in the fourth quarter this year. Escalade Platinum features elegant, hand-crafted luxury additions to both the exterior and interior while the entire Escalade range gets new technical features, highlighted by the addition of 4G LTE connectivity, a new 8-speed automatic transmission and a Surround View camera system to help increase visibility. "Since the launch just a few months ago, the next-generation Escalade has proved exceptionally desirable among luxury SUV buyers," said Uwe Ellinghaus, chief marketing officer, Cadillac. "Now, within the same year we are able to elevate the Escalade line with the Platinum Collection, as well as deliver enhancements through the entire Escalade range." The 2015 Escalade Platinum extends and upgrades the use of premium materials within the Escalade's cut and sewn interior. First- and second-row seats are wrapped in Nappa semi-aniline leather, while the dashboard, upper door panels and center console are clad in hand-stitched and hand-wrapped leather. Customers can choose between two distinct interior environments, each paired with sueded microfiber headliner trim and unique exotic wood accents. Escalade Platinum Collection is also designed to provide passengers with unsurpassed comfort and convenience. Heated and cooled 18-way power front seats are standard, and include a massaging function on the driver's seat. A pair of seven-inch LCD screens, embedded in the front head rests, supplement the overhead 9-inch screen, while a cooled center console compartment can keep chilled beverages handy. Platinum models also include premium floor mats and Platinum-branded door sill plates. Escalade Platinum models ride on 22-inch wheels and the model is distinguished by chrome accents, Platinum exterior badging, and a unique grille mesh design. All Escalade models wear the new, streamlined Cadillac Crest. In addition, all Escalade models – from the standard Collection through to the Platinum – feature a host of technology upgrades. Vehicle performance is aided by the new eight-speed automatic transmission that is standard on all models, as well as a two-speed transfer case standard on four-wheel drive models. An electronic hands-free liftgate already standard on Escalade will also feature hands-free closing capability. Like the new ATS sport sedan, Escalade includes OnStar with 4G LTE connectivity with a WiFi hotspot capable of connecting up to seven devices and inductive wireless device charging. Surround View, which provides a bird's eye view of the area immediately surrounding the vehicle. The enhancements add just $1275 to Escalade's starting price in the U.S., for a total of $73,965, including destination. The top-of-the-range 2015 Escalade Platinum is priced from $90,270, including $995 in destination.
  6. Even though the Cadillac Escalade is quite fresh, Cadillac has a number of changes in store for it in the coming year to keep it the thick of the luxury SUV battleground. The big change is the introduction of the Platinum trim for the Escalade. The Platinum trim adds a bit more shine on the exterior with additional chrome trim, twenty-two inch wheels, Cadillac's new crest, and Platinum badges. Inside, the Escalade Platinum gets Nappa semi-aniline leather in a choice of either beige or gray; suede microfiber headliner, heated and cooled seats for the front, eighteen-way power seats, and three screens for rear seat passengers (two seven-inch screens in the headrests, and a nine-inch screen in the center). Other changes for the 2015 model include an eight-speed automatic taking the place of the six-speed, a new two-speed transfer case for four-wheel drive models, Surround View camera system, 4G LTE connectivity, and a hands-free power liftgate. Pricing for the 2015 Escalade will start at $73,965 (includes $995 destination charge), while the new Escalade Platinum model kicks off at $90,270. Source: Cadillac William Maley is a staff writer for Cheers & Gears. He can be reached at william.maley@cheersandgears.comor you can follow him on twitter at @realmudmonster. Press Release is on Page 2 New Platinum Collection, Added Features Elevate Escalade Craftsmanship and Technology Entire SUV line gets 8-Speed transmission, Surround View camera and 4G LTE connectivity DETROIT – Cadillac today announced numerous enhancements to the just-launched 2015 Escalade, including the new range-topping Platinum Collection model launching in the fourth quarter this year. Escalade Platinum features elegant, hand-crafted luxury additions to both the exterior and interior while the entire Escalade range gets new technical features, highlighted by the addition of 4G LTE connectivity, a new 8-speed automatic transmission and a Surround View camera system to help increase visibility. "Since the launch just a few months ago, the next-generation Escalade has proved exceptionally desirable among luxury SUV buyers," said Uwe Ellinghaus, chief marketing officer, Cadillac. "Now, within the same year we are able to elevate the Escalade line with the Platinum Collection, as well as deliver enhancements through the entire Escalade range." The 2015 Escalade Platinum extends and upgrades the use of premium materials within the Escalade's cut and sewn interior. First- and second-row seats are wrapped in Nappa semi-aniline leather, while the dashboard, upper door panels and center console are clad in hand-stitched and hand-wrapped leather. Customers can choose between two distinct interior environments, each paired with sueded microfiber headliner trim and unique exotic wood accents. Escalade Platinum Collection is also designed to provide passengers with unsurpassed comfort and convenience. Heated and cooled 18-way power front seats are standard, and include a massaging function on the driver's seat. A pair of seven-inch LCD screens, embedded in the front head rests, supplement the overhead 9-inch screen, while a cooled center console compartment can keep chilled beverages handy. Platinum models also include premium floor mats and Platinum-branded door sill plates. Escalade Platinum models ride on 22-inch wheels and the model is distinguished by chrome accents, Platinum exterior badging, and a unique grille mesh design. All Escalade models wear the new, streamlined Cadillac Crest. In addition, all Escalade models – from the standard Collection through to the Platinum – feature a host of technology upgrades. Vehicle performance is aided by the new eight-speed automatic transmission that is standard on all models, as well as a two-speed transfer case standard on four-wheel drive models. An electronic hands-free liftgate already standard on Escalade will also feature hands-free closing capability. Like the new ATS sport sedan, Escalade includes OnStar with 4G LTE connectivity with a WiFi hotspot capable of connecting up to seven devices and inductive wireless device charging. Surround View, which provides a bird's eye view of the area immediately surrounding the vehicle. The enhancements add just $1275 to Escalade's starting price in the U.S., for a total of $73,965, including destination. The top-of-the-range 2015 Escalade Platinum is priced from $90,270, including $995 in destination. View full article
  7. In the full-size SUV class, the GM family of the Chevrolet Tahoe/Suburban and GMC Yukon/Yukon XL dominate the class. Every other model in this group just seems to try for second or third place. But why is that? Well I spent a week with a 2014 Nissan Armada to try and answer this question. The Armada happens to be the oldest model in the class, being introduced back in 2004. You wouldn’t know that by looking at the exterior as it still looks fresh with such design details as a large grille and headlights, flared out fenders, a unique roofline, and twenty-inch wheels. The interior got some much needed updates back in `08 with improved materials and a revised dashboard layout. These changes again make the Armada feel younger than it actually is. However the infotainment system does reveal how old this vehicle is with a somewhat dated interface and chunky graphics. Space is very generous for the first and second row, while the third row is best reserved for kids or being folded into the floor to increase cargo space from 20 to 57.7 cubic feet of space. Under the hood is a 5.6L V8 engine with 317 horsepower and 385 pound-feet of torque, paired up with a five-speed automatic and optional four-wheel drive. The V8 does a fine job of moving the Armada’s curb weight of 5,841 pounds and the five-speed automatic delivers crisp shifts. But the downside comes in fuel economy as the EPA rates the Armada at 12 City/18 Highway/14 Combined. My week average landed at 12.4 MPG. As for the ride, the Armada is a comfortable highway cruiser, but does let in a slight amount of wind and road noise. On rougher surfaces, the Armada is very truck-like as it communicates every imperfection on the road. There is one saving grace to the Armada and that is the price. A base Armada with 2WD will set you back $36,890. My as-tested Armada Platinum with 4WD was $53,595.00 and that included navigation, leather, heated seats for the first and second row, dual-zone climate control, a DVD player, and much more. But even with that price tag, the Armada is just outclassed. While the value and nice interior are there, the poor fuel economy and ride quality just put it way behind the competition. Unless you get a smoking deal on an Armada, it's best that you pass on it. Disclaimer: Nissan Provided the Armada, Insurance, and One Tank of Gas Year: 2014 Make: Nissan Model: Armada Trim: Platinum 4X4 Engine: 5.6L V8 Driveline: Five-Speed Automatic, Four-Wheel Drive Horsepower @ RPM: 317 @ 5,200 Torque @ RPM: 385 @ 3,400 Fuel Economy: City/Highway/Combined - 12/18/14 Curb Weight: 5,841 lbs Location of Manufacture: Canton, TN Base Price: $52,360.00 As Tested Price: $53,595.00 (Includes $995.00 Destination Charge) Options: Floor & Cargo Mats - $240.00 William Maley is a staff writer for Cheers & Gears. He can be reached at william.maley@cheersandgears.com or you can follow him on twitter at @realmudmonster. View full article
  8. In the full-size SUV class, the GM family of the Chevrolet Tahoe/Suburban and GMC Yukon/Yukon XL dominate the class. Every other model in this group just seems to try for second or third place. But why is that? Well I spent a week with a 2014 Nissan Armada to try and answer this question. The Armada happens to be the oldest model in the class, being introduced back in 2004. You wouldn’t know that by looking at the exterior as it still looks fresh with such design details as a large grille and headlights, flared out fenders, a unique roofline, and twenty-inch wheels. The interior got some much needed updates back in `08 with improved materials and a revised dashboard layout. These changes again make the Armada feel younger than it actually is. However the infotainment system does reveal how old this vehicle is with a somewhat dated interface and chunky graphics. Space is very generous for the first and second row, while the third row is best reserved for kids or being folded into the floor to increase cargo space from 20 to 57.7 cubic feet of space. Under the hood is a 5.6L V8 engine with 317 horsepower and 385 pound-feet of torque, paired up with a five-speed automatic and optional four-wheel drive. The V8 does a fine job of moving the Armada’s curb weight of 5,841 pounds and the five-speed automatic delivers crisp shifts. But the downside comes in fuel economy as the EPA rates the Armada at 12 City/18 Highway/14 Combined. My week average landed at 12.4 MPG. As for the ride, the Armada is a comfortable highway cruiser, but does let in a slight amount of wind and road noise. On rougher surfaces, the Armada is very truck-like as it communicates every imperfection on the road. There is one saving grace to the Armada and that is the price. A base Armada with 2WD will set you back $36,890. My as-tested Armada Platinum with 4WD was $53,595.00 and that included navigation, leather, heated seats for the first and second row, dual-zone climate control, a DVD player, and much more. But even with that price tag, the Armada is just outclassed. While the value and nice interior are there, the poor fuel economy and ride quality just put it way behind the competition. Unless you get a smoking deal on an Armada, it's best that you pass on it. Disclaimer: Nissan Provided the Armada, Insurance, and One Tank of Gas Year: 2014 Make: Nissan Model: Armada Trim: Platinum 4X4 Engine: 5.6L V8 Driveline: Five-Speed Automatic, Four-Wheel Drive Horsepower @ RPM: 317 @ 5,200 Torque @ RPM: 385 @ 3,400 Fuel Economy: City/Highway/Combined - 12/18/14 Curb Weight: 5,841 lbs Location of Manufacture: Canton, TN Base Price: $52,360.00 As Tested Price: $53,595.00 (Includes $995.00 Destination Charge) Options: Floor & Cargo Mats - $240.00 William Maley is a staff writer for Cheers & Gears. He can be reached at william.maley@cheersandgears.com or you can follow him on twitter at @realmudmonster.
  9. William Maley Staff Writer - CheersandGears.com July 24, 2013 Stopgap. Standby. Stand-In. Makeshift. Temporary. Interim. Placeholder. All of these words in one way or another have been used to describe Cadillac's current flagship, the XTS. When the XTS was introduced back in 2012, it filled the gap left by the DTS and STS. It also became a vehicle to serve as the flagship until the long-rumored rear-wheel drive flagship appears. But do all these words hurt the XTS? Is it something more than a placeholder in the Cadillac lineup? I recently spent a week with a 2013 XTS Platinum AWD to answer this question. The XTS might be my favorite Cadillac design to date. The overall shape makes a callback to current crop of Cadillac vehicles, most notably the ATS and SRX. Up front is massive front grille with the distinct satin-chrome grille insert for Platinum models. On either side is a set of sweptback HID headlights that move when you turn the steering wheel. The headlights also feature LED lighting along the outer edge and another set of LEDs underneath. The side profile shows off a set of twenty-inch aluminum wheels, chrome trim along the door sills and windows, and illuminated door handles. The back features vertical taillights with some fin action to give homage to the late-fifties' Cadillacs and a stoplamp that doubles as a spoiler. Moving inside, the XTS is General Motors most ambitious effort on adding technologies to a vehicle. The driver faces a color display that offers four different gauge layouts and abundance of information screens that you can throw on to the screen. I found the display easy to read and very informative. Also new is a color heads-up display which displays your speed and other key information. Cadillac's CUE infotainment system is standard on the XTS Platinum and much like the SRX I had back in March, the system has been getting better. CUE is much smoother and the responsiveness is quick when you press the screen or capacitive buttons. Still, the distraction problem is very evident and it does take some time to fully understand how to use the system. Luxuries abound in the XTS Platinum's interior. You have leather lining the door panels, dashboard, and plush seats. Driver and front passenger get power adjustments, heat, and ventilated seats. In the back, you'll find an abundance of legroom, decent headroom, manual sunshades for the windows, rear climate control, and heated seats. Powering this big Cadillac is the venerable 3.6L Direct Injected V6 with 304 horsepower and 264 pound-feet of torque. A six-speed automatic routes the power to either the front wheels or all four wheels. The 3.6L is not the right engine for the XTS. When you think back to the big Cadillacs of yesteryear, all of them used a big V8 engine with the torque arriving on the low end of the RPM spectrum. The XTS' 3.6L is the complete opposite. With torque arriving at 5,200 RPM, you really have to work the engine if you want to get moving. Add on a curb weight of 4,215 pounds for the XTS Platinum with AWD, and you're in for a world of hurt. Now General Motors has announced a new twin-turbo 3.6L Direct Injected V6 with 410 horsepower and 369 pound-feet of torque for the 2014 XTS. Lets hope this is the engine to give it some needed kick. As for the other parts of the drivetrain, the six-speed automatic works perfectly by delivering very smooth shifts. The Haldex all-wheel drive system was very unobtrusive whenever it worked its magic. Fuel economy is another disappointment for the XTS. The EPA rates the 2013 XTS Platinum AWD at 17 City/26 Highway/20 Combined. During my week, I averaged 19 MPG in mixed conditions. What does the XTS does uphold in big Cadillac tradition is excellent ride and comfort. General Motors went all out on the XTS' suspension by equipping Magnetic Ride Control and a rear air suspension system. These two systems paired together provided one of the smoothest rides I have ever experienced. Bumps and road imperfections seem to be ironed out. Steering also follows big Cadillac tradition; light and really no road feel. This is ok since it’s a big luxury sedan, not a small, sports sedan. One other feature I should mention is Cadillac's Safety Seat Alert. This system is tied in with a number of safety systems in the vehicle such as the lane departure warning and rear cross traffic alert. If one the safety systems detect an obstacle or the car going over the lane, it will activate the safety seat alert and vibrate the bottom cushion to alert the driver. When I first experienced it, it made me jump. I wasn't sure what was happening until I looked at the window sticker and realized my tester was equipped with it. After that, I found the system to be a unique way to alert a driver what’s going on without using any buzzers or beeps. If you're wondering, you can turn the system off. So does the XTS deserve the placeholder sticker? The answer isn't that simple. On one hand, the XTS appears to be a stand in for the long-rumored Cadillac flagship that is reportedly coming out in either 2016 or 2017. Plus, the XTS doesn't follow the current convention that Cadillacs are supposed to attack the roads like their German counter parts. But the XTS is very much an old school Cadillac in many ways. The number of luxury appointments and tech will make you feel that you're in a very special car and the suspension setup provides one of the smoothest rides around. The only thing missing is an engine that can provide the smooth low-end power needed for it. It might be a placeholder, but it is one that is very deserving of the wreath and crest badge. Disclaimer: General Motors Provided the XTS, Insurance, and One Tank of Gas Year - 2013 Make – Cadillac Model – XTS4 Trim – Platinum Engine – 3.6L VVT SIDI V6 Driveline – All-Wheel Drive, Six-Speed Automatic Transmission Horsepower @ RPM – 304 @ 6,800 RPM Torque @ RPM – 264 @ 5,200 RPM Fuel Economy: City/Highway/Combined - 17/26/20 Curb Weight – 4,215 lbs Location of Manufacture – Oshawa, Ontario Base Price - $60,385.00 As Tested Price - $64,695.00* (Includes $920.00 destination charge) Options: Driver Assist Package - $2,395.00 Crystal Red Tintcoat Paint - $995.00 William Maley is a staff writer for Cheers & Gears. He can be reached at william.maley@cheersandgears.com or you can follow him on twitter at @realmudmonster. View full article
  10. William Maley Staff Writer - CheersandGears.com July 24, 2013 Stopgap. Standby. Stand-In. Makeshift. Temporary. Interim. Placeholder. All of these words in one way or another have been used to describe Cadillac's current flagship, the XTS. When the XTS was introduced back in 2012, it filled the gap left by the DTS and STS. It also became a vehicle to serve as the flagship until the long-rumored rear-wheel drive flagship appears. But do all these words hurt the XTS? Is it something more than a placeholder in the Cadillac lineup? I recently spent a week with a 2013 XTS Platinum AWD to answer this question. The XTS might be my favorite Cadillac design to date. The overall shape makes a callback to current crop of Cadillac vehicles, most notably the ATS and SRX. Up front is massive front grille with the distinct satin-chrome grille insert for Platinum models. On either side is a set of sweptback HID headlights that move when you turn the steering wheel. The headlights also feature LED lighting along the outer edge and another set of LEDs underneath. The side profile shows off a set of twenty-inch aluminum wheels, chrome trim along the door sills and windows, and illuminated door handles. The back features vertical taillights with some fin action to give homage to the late-fifties' Cadillacs and a stoplamp that doubles as a spoiler. Moving inside, the XTS is General Motors most ambitious effort on adding technologies to a vehicle. The driver faces a color display that offers four different gauge layouts and abundance of information screens that you can throw on to the screen. I found the display easy to read and very informative. Also new is a color heads-up display which displays your speed and other key information. Cadillac's CUE infotainment system is standard on the XTS Platinum and much like the SRX I had back in March, the system has been getting better. CUE is much smoother and the responsiveness is quick when you press the screen or capacitive buttons. Still, the distraction problem is very evident and it does take some time to fully understand how to use the system. Luxuries abound in the XTS Platinum's interior. You have leather lining the door panels, dashboard, and plush seats. Driver and front passenger get power adjustments, heat, and ventilated seats. In the back, you'll find an abundance of legroom, decent headroom, manual sunshades for the windows, rear climate control, and heated seats. Powering this big Cadillac is the venerable 3.6L Direct Injected V6 with 304 horsepower and 264 pound-feet of torque. A six-speed automatic routes the power to either the front wheels or all four wheels. The 3.6L is not the right engine for the XTS. When you think back to the big Cadillacs of yesteryear, all of them used a big V8 engine with the torque arriving on the low end of the RPM spectrum. The XTS' 3.6L is the complete opposite. With torque arriving at 5,200 RPM, you really have to work the engine if you want to get moving. Add on a curb weight of 4,215 pounds for the XTS Platinum with AWD, and you're in for a world of hurt. Now General Motors has announced a new twin-turbo 3.6L Direct Injected V6 with 410 horsepower and 369 pound-feet of torque for the 2014 XTS. Lets hope this is the engine to give it some needed kick. As for the other parts of the drivetrain, the six-speed automatic works perfectly by delivering very smooth shifts. The Haldex all-wheel drive system was very unobtrusive whenever it worked its magic. Fuel economy is another disappointment for the XTS. The EPA rates the 2013 XTS Platinum AWD at 17 City/26 Highway/20 Combined. During my week, I averaged 19 MPG in mixed conditions. What does the XTS does uphold in big Cadillac tradition is excellent ride and comfort. General Motors went all out on the XTS' suspension by equipping Magnetic Ride Control and a rear air suspension system. These two systems paired together provided one of the smoothest rides I have ever experienced. Bumps and road imperfections seem to be ironed out. Steering also follows big Cadillac tradition; light and really no road feel. This is ok since it’s a big luxury sedan, not a small, sports sedan. One other feature I should mention is Cadillac's Safety Seat Alert. This system is tied in with a number of safety systems in the vehicle such as the lane departure warning and rear cross traffic alert. If one the safety systems detect an obstacle or the car going over the lane, it will activate the safety seat alert and vibrate the bottom cushion to alert the driver. When I first experienced it, it made me jump. I wasn't sure what was happening until I looked at the window sticker and realized my tester was equipped with it. After that, I found the system to be a unique way to alert a driver what’s going on without using any buzzers or beeps. If you're wondering, you can turn the system off. So does the XTS deserve the placeholder sticker? The answer isn't that simple. On one hand, the XTS appears to be a stand in for the long-rumored Cadillac flagship that is reportedly coming out in either 2016 or 2017. Plus, the XTS doesn't follow the current convention that Cadillacs are supposed to attack the roads like their German counter parts. But the XTS is very much an old school Cadillac in many ways. The number of luxury appointments and tech will make you feel that you're in a very special car and the suspension setup provides one of the smoothest rides around. The only thing missing is an engine that can provide the smooth low-end power needed for it. It might be a placeholder, but it is one that is very deserving of the wreath and crest badge. Disclaimer: General Motors Provided the XTS, Insurance, and One Tank of Gas Year - 2013 Make – Cadillac Model – XTS4 Trim – Platinum Engine – 3.6L VVT SIDI V6 Driveline – All-Wheel Drive, Six-Speed Automatic Transmission Horsepower @ RPM – 304 @ 6,800 RPM Torque @ RPM – 264 @ 5,200 RPM Fuel Economy: City/Highway/Combined - 17/26/20 Curb Weight – 4,215 lbs Location of Manufacture – Oshawa, Ontario Base Price - $60,385.00 As Tested Price - $64,695.00* (Includes $920.00 destination charge) Options: Driver Assist Package - $2,395.00 Crystal Red Tintcoat Paint - $995.00 William Maley is a staff writer for Cheers & Gears. He can be reached at william.maley@cheersandgears.com or you can follow him on twitter at @realmudmonster.

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