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    2013 Cadillac XTS Platinum


    William Maley

    Staff Writer - CheersandGears.com

    July 24, 2013

    Stopgap. Standby. Stand-In. Makeshift. Temporary. Interim. Placeholder.

    All of these words in one way or another have been used to describe Cadillac's current flagship, the XTS. When the XTS was introduced back in 2012, it filled the gap left by the DTS and STS. It also became a vehicle to serve as the flagship until the long-rumored rear-wheel drive flagship appears.

    But do all these words hurt the XTS? Is it something more than a placeholder in the Cadillac lineup? I recently spent a week with a 2013 XTS Platinum AWD to answer this question.

    The XTS might be my favorite Cadillac design to date. The overall shape makes a callback to current crop of Cadillac vehicles, most notably the ATS and SRX. Up front is massive front grille with the distinct satin-chrome grille insert for Platinum models. On either side is a set of sweptback HID headlights that move when you turn the steering wheel. The headlights also feature LED lighting along the outer edge and another set of LEDs underneath. The side profile shows off a set of twenty-inch aluminum wheels, chrome trim along the door sills and windows, and illuminated door handles. The back features vertical taillights with some fin action to give homage to the late-fifties' Cadillacs and a stoplamp that doubles as a spoiler.

    gallery_10485_674_1888667.jpg

    Moving inside, the XTS is General Motors most ambitious effort on adding technologies to a vehicle. The driver faces a color display that offers four different gauge layouts and abundance of information screens that you can throw on to the screen. I found the display easy to read and very informative. Also new is a color heads-up display which displays your speed and other key information.

    Cadillac's CUE infotainment system is standard on the XTS Platinum and much like the SRX I had back in March, the system has been getting better. CUE is much smoother and the responsiveness is quick when you press the screen or capacitive buttons. Still, the distraction problem is very evident and it does take some time to fully understand how to use the system.

    gallery_10485_674_1594860.jpg

    Luxuries abound in the XTS Platinum's interior. You have leather lining the door panels, dashboard, and plush seats. Driver and front passenger get power adjustments, heat, and ventilated seats. In the back, you'll find an abundance of legroom, decent headroom, manual sunshades for the windows, rear climate control, and heated seats.

    Powering this big Cadillac is the venerable 3.6L Direct Injected V6 with 304 horsepower and 264 pound-feet of torque. A six-speed automatic routes the power to either the front wheels or all four wheels.

    gallery_10485_674_118015.jpg

    The 3.6L is not the right engine for the XTS. When you think back to the big Cadillacs of yesteryear, all of them used a big V8 engine with the torque arriving on the low end of the RPM spectrum. The XTS' 3.6L is the complete opposite. With torque arriving at 5,200 RPM, you really have to work the engine if you want to get moving. Add on a curb weight of 4,215 pounds for the XTS Platinum with AWD, and you're in for a world of hurt. Now General Motors has announced a new twin-turbo 3.6L Direct Injected V6 with 410 horsepower and 369 pound-feet of torque for the 2014 XTS. Lets hope this is the engine to give it some needed kick. As for the other parts of the drivetrain, the six-speed automatic works perfectly by delivering very smooth shifts. The Haldex all-wheel drive system was very unobtrusive whenever it worked its magic.

    Fuel economy is another disappointment for the XTS. The EPA rates the 2013 XTS Platinum AWD at 17 City/26 Highway/20 Combined. During my week, I averaged 19 MPG in mixed conditions.

    What does the XTS does uphold in big Cadillac tradition is excellent ride and comfort. General Motors went all out on the XTS' suspension by equipping Magnetic Ride Control and a rear air suspension system. These two systems paired together provided one of the smoothest rides I have ever experienced. Bumps and road imperfections seem to be ironed out. Steering also follows big Cadillac tradition; light and really no road feel. This is ok since it’s a big luxury sedan, not a small, sports sedan.

    gallery_10485_674_511664.jpg

    One other feature I should mention is Cadillac's Safety Seat Alert. This system is tied in with a number of safety systems in the vehicle such as the lane departure warning and rear cross traffic alert. If one the safety systems detect an obstacle or the car going over the lane, it will activate the safety seat alert and vibrate the bottom cushion to alert the driver. When I first experienced it, it made me jump. I wasn't sure what was happening until I looked at the window sticker and realized my tester was equipped with it. After that, I found the system to be a unique way to alert a driver what’s going on without using any buzzers or beeps. If you're wondering, you can turn the system off.

    So does the XTS deserve the placeholder sticker? The answer isn't that simple. On one hand, the XTS appears to be a stand in for the long-rumored Cadillac flagship that is reportedly coming out in either 2016 or 2017. Plus, the XTS doesn't follow the current convention that Cadillacs are supposed to attack the roads like their German counter parts.

    But the XTS is very much an old school Cadillac in many ways. The number of luxury appointments and tech will make you feel that you're in a very special car and the suspension setup provides one of the smoothest rides around. The only thing missing is an engine that can provide the smooth low-end power needed for it.

    It might be a placeholder, but it is one that is very deserving of the wreath and crest badge.

    gallery_10485_674_313330.jpg

    Disclaimer: General Motors Provided the XTS, Insurance, and One Tank of Gas

    Year - 2013

    Make – Cadillac

    Model – XTS4

    Trim – Platinum

    Engine – 3.6L VVT SIDI V6

    Driveline – All-Wheel Drive, Six-Speed Automatic Transmission

    Horsepower @ RPM – 304 @ 6,800 RPM

    Torque @ RPM – 264 @ 5,200 RPM

    Fuel Economy: City/Highway/Combined - 17/26/20

    Curb Weight – 4,215 lbs

    Location of Manufacture – Oshawa, Ontario

    Base Price - $60,385.00

    As Tested Price - $64,695.00* (Includes $920.00 destination charge)

    Options:

    Driver Assist Package - $2,395.00

    Crystal Red Tintcoat Paint - $995.00

    William Maley is a staff writer for Cheers & Gears. He can be reached at william.maley@cheersandgears.com or you can follow him on twitter at @realmudmonster.

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    Excellent review, I do love the heads up display and the AWD system. For most people I agree with you that they will find this a worthy Cadillac and a big step up from the DTS/STS. The TT V6 should be a great shot in the arm for the car.

    I really like the heads up display on the glass and the flow of the dash. Makes for a wonderful driving experience.

    I can say from my own personal experience of driving one that at 6'6" tall while a very short person or kid could sit behind me, anyone over 5'8" tall will have to straddle the drivers seat as for big tall guys you loose all that rear leg room.

    Very nice write up, way to go Mud. :)

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    I don't see it as a place holder at all, it's more the vehicle Cadillac has (needs?) to cater to the livery/fleet market without compromising the resale value of the other models... Especially with the LTS just around the corner...

    Still think the XTS design would have been nothing short of stunning if it sat on a RWD platform...

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    I think the concept version of the XTS had the styling right. I prefer the rear doors and the c-pillar on the XTS concept as it looks more Cadillac than the final product. Too many cars have this c-pillar and it looks like the 1990's Toyota Avalon too. The concept also had the headlights right too. I like the reconfigurable cluster.

    x10cc_ca007.jpg

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    A year or so ago, I would've agreed that the XTS is a placeholder. But now I'd say it's Cadillac's 'Phaeton,' and there's nothing wrong with that. Its high-tech atmosphere and smooth, pleasant ride makes the vehicle a 'boulevardier' for someone who is wealthy, but not ostentatious.

    Great review!

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    Excellent writeup, excellent pictures. Love the writing style. In this case, framed the premise of the car perfectly.

    I bet the twin turbo of this car is a fantastic road car.

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    Even though the writer mentioned that a twin turbo 3.6L V6 is forthcoming shortly, I think this car deserves a new Ecotec(?) 5300 like in the new Corvette instead of the DOHC engine.

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    At $64k I'd take a Hyundai Equus over this. Which makes me think, has any magazine or website done a comparison test with a Hyundai Equus in it? Because on price, you'd compare it to a XTS and Acura RL, on size more Lexus LS460L.

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    William, I know you are busy but can you give us a quick review between these two? I like many are interested in your input on a comparison between these two awesome cars.

    Thanks in advance. :)

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    new XTS like 8k off sticker right now. Impalas selling for close to MSRP.

    loaded impala or base XTS standard? almost close in price.....

    eh... that might be a one off.

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    new XTS like 8k off sticker right now. Impalas selling for close to MSRP.

    loaded impala or base XTS standard? almost close in price.....

    eh... that might be a one off.

    Probably dealers doing an end-of-the-model-year clearance as the '14s are coming..

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    I'm not a real big fan of Cadillacs (can't even remeber the last time I set foot in one actually), but looking at these screens, I have to say wow. The interior is better then I thought it was be...

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    Even though the writer mentioned that a twin turbo 3.6L V6 is forthcoming shortly, I think this car deserves a new Ecotec(?) 5300 like in the new Corvette instead of the DOHC engine.

    Probably not built for sideways installation.

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    It sounds like the 3.6 LFX could use a gearing upgrade or better an 8 speed trans axle with upgraded gears for better low end grunt and more relaxed highway cruising for better highway mileage. Hyundai has the answer with there Genesis which uses a larger and more torque rich 3.8 and an 8 speed transmission as that car has no trouble accelerating whatsoever. It's a shame GM's most expensive luxury mark is out of the V8 engine business. A nice 4.0 liter DOHC V8 with 350 torque or so would be just what this car needs.

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    GM has the 410hp Twin-Turbo V6 available in the V-Sport model.... it's got a lot of spank. Pretty much negates the need for a V8 unless you are going for V-Series type extremes.

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    GM has the 410hp Twin-Turbo V6 available in the V-Sport model.... it's got a lot of spank. Pretty much negates the need for a V8 unless you are going for V-Series type extremes.

    Well I have an XTS VSport coming in for review tommrow.. Can't wait to see how Twin-Turbo V6 fares in the XTS.

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    Buckle up!

    Edit: One thing I can point out.... in "normal" mode, you will experience what will feel like turbo lag on a sharp stab of the accelerator. It isn't turbo lag, it is the transmission trying to be frugal while you're trying to have fun. Sport mode removes this inconvenience... and then you really do need to buckle up.

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    • By William Maley
      For a time, the V6 was looked down upon in the likes of the Chevrolet Camaro, Dodge Challenger, and Ford Mustang because they were seen as lackluster. The engines didn’t match aggression that was being expressed by the exterior of the coupes. But rising gas prices and increasing regulations on fuel economy and emissions has the likes of GM, Ford, and FCA revisiting the idea of a V6 muscle car. We recently spent some time in a 2016 Dodge Challenger V6 to see if it is worth it.
      I will argue that the Challenger is still the meanest looking out of the three muscle cars on sale. Dodge’s designers were able to bring the design of the original Challenger into the modern era without making it look like a complete mess. The little details such as the narrow grille, quad headlights, fuel filler cap, and rectangular taillights are here and help it stand out. Our tester featured the optional Blacktop package that adds a blacked-out grille, black stripes, and a set of 20-inch wheels. The downside to bringing the original Challenger design into the modern era is poor visibility. Large rear pillars and a small glass area make it somewhat difficult to backup or making a pass. The good news is that a number of Challenger models like our SXT Plus come with a backup camera as standard and blind spot monitoring is available as an option. The Challenger’s interior hasn’t changed much since we last reviewed it back in 2014 with the SRT 392. It is still a comfortable place to sit in and controls are in easy reach for the driver thanks to the center stack being slightly angled. Still, the limited glass area does mean you will feel somewhat confined. Power for the SXT is Chrysler’s 3.6L Pentastar V6 with 305 horsepower and 268 pound-feet of torque. This is paired with an eight-speed automatic only. If you want a manual, you need to step to one of the V8 engines. The V6 is quite surprising with how much performance is on offer. Step on the accelerator and the V6 moves the Challenger with surprising authority. Power comes on a smooth rate no matter what gear you find yourself in. The eight-speed automatic is one of best in the business with smart shifts. Only disappointment is the V6 doesn’t sound like it belongs in the Challenger. There isn’t that muscular roar when step on the accelerator. A new exhaust and some tweaking in the engine could fix this issue.  As for fuel economy, we got an average of 23.4 mpg. Not bad for a coupe that is rated at 19 City/30 Highway/23 Combined. One item that the Challenger is known for is its ride comfort and this hasn’t changed. Even with the optional Super Track Pak fitted to our tester, the Challenger was able to provide a cushy ride over some of Michigan’s terrible roads. Road and wind noise are kept at very low levels. Speaking of the Super Track Pak, this should be mandatory equipment on the V6 model. With firmer suspension bits, it makes the Challenger feel slightly smaller and reduces body roll around corners. However, it cannot mask the Challenger’s weight. Pushing it around a corner, the Challenger feels quite big and not as nimble the as the Chevrolet Camaro I drove afterward. The Challenger SXT Plus starts at $29,995. Add on a few options such as the Blacktop package and you’ll came to an as-tested price of $34,965, pretty good value for a muscle car. Going with the V6 option in the Challenger isn’t bad a choice. You get the looks of a muscle car and some decent performance. But as I drove the Challenger during the week, I couldn’t help but think about what if I had the V8. Six is good, but eight is even better. Disclaimer: Dodge Provided the Challenger, Insurance, and One Tank of Gas
      Year: 2016
      Make: Dodge
      Model: Challenger
      Trim: SXT Plus
      Engine: 3.6L 24-Valve VVT V6
      Driveline: Rear-Wheel Drive, Eight-Speed Automatic
      Horsepower @ RPM: 305 @ 6,350
      Torque @ RPM: 268 @ 4,800
      Fuel Economy: City/Highway/Combined - 19/30/23
      Curb Weight: 3,885.2 lbs
      Location of Manufacture: Brampton, Ontario
      Base Price: $26,995
      As Tested Price: $34,965 (Includes $995.00 Destination Charge)
      Options:
      SXT Plus 3.6L V6 Package 21V - $3,000.00
      Driver Convenience Group - $1,095.00
      Sound Group II - $795.00
      Blacktop Package - $695.00
      Super Track Pak - $695.00
      UConnect 8.4 NAV - $695.00

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