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Found 8 results

  1. The Toyota Tundra holds the title of being the oldest full-size truck, coming in at thirteen years without any sort of redesign. On one hand, this makes the Tundra a very reliable and dependable truck. On the other hand, the Tundra isn’t able to fully compete with the likes GM, Ram, or Ford with their more modern designs and hardware. But there is one exception to this where the Tundra can be a good alternative to the Detroit Three, and it comes in the form of the TRD Pro. Color can do a lot to a vehicle such as making an older model look modern or highlighting some of the polarizing elements of a design. This Army Green paint, which is new on all TRD Pros for 2020 makes the Tundra look younger and a bit more aggressive. Inside, you can tell that the Tundra is getting up there in age. The design hasn’t changed much and material quality cannot even compare to the likes of GM and Ram’s trucks. But I like the large buttons and knobs for various controls. Not only does it make it easier to find, but it means you can have a set of gloves on and easily control various aspects. One key improvement for 2020 is Apple CarPlay and Android Auto being added to the Tundra’s Entune system, which gives drivers another choice in their infotainment choices. The Crewmax model seen here is huge. Step into the back seat and you might think you entered a limo with an endless amount of head and legroom on offer. I do wish the seats had a little bit more padding. Only one engine is available on the 2020 Tundra; a 5.7L V8 with 381 horsepower and 401 pound-feet of torque. This is teamed with a six-speed automatic and four-wheel drive. This engine provides plenty of thrust and provides an engine burble that you might expect from one of the Detroit three’s V8 trucks. The automatic is very smooth when changing gear and seems to where it needs to be in any situation. The downside to this V8 is fuel economy. The EPA says TRD Pro CrewMax will return 13 City/17 Highway/14 Combined. I saw an average of 14.2 mpg during my week of a 60/40 mix of highway and city driving. Maybe a couple more gears for the automatic could improve this. Toyota has kitted the Tundra TRD Pro with some serious off-road chops; Fox internal bypass dampers for all four corners, TRD springs that increase wheel travel, and a set of Michelin LTX off-road tires. Unfortunately, I didn’t get a chance to try it off-road. But other reviewers who have taken it off the beaten path report the TRD Pro is very capable. What I can report is the changes to the suspension makes for a surprisingly comfortable ride. This suspension does mean you will experience a fair amount of body roll when cornering, but that is to be expected with a truck like this. My Tundra TRD Pro CrewMax starts at $52,780. With some accessories and destination, the price climbs $55,020. The Tundra is getting long in the tooth as evidenced by the interior and poor fuel economy from the V8 engine. But the TRD Pro helps freshen the Tundra a bit and makes a compelling option for those who plan on spending more time off the beaten path. Disclaimer: Toyota Provided the Tundra, Insurance, and One Tank of Gas Year: 2020 Make: Toyota Model: Tundra Trim: TRD Pro CrewMax Engine: 5.7L DOHC 32-Valve i-FORCE V8 Driveline: Six-Speed Automatic, Four-Wheel Drive Horsepower @ RPM: 381 @ 5,600 Torque @ RPM: 401 @ 3,600 Fuel Economy: City/Highway/Combined - 13/17/14 Curb Weight: N/A Location of Manufacture: San Antonio, TX Base Price: $52,780 As Tested Price: $55,020 (Includes $1,495.00 Destination Charge) Options: Chrome Tube Steps - $535.00 Stainless Steel Door Edge Guard - $140.00 Door Sill Protector - $70.00 View full article
  2. The Toyota Tundra holds the title of being the oldest full-size truck, coming in at thirteen years without any sort of redesign. On one hand, this makes the Tundra a very reliable and dependable truck. On the other hand, the Tundra isn’t able to fully compete with the likes GM, Ram, or Ford with their more modern designs and hardware. But there is one exception to this where the Tundra can be a good alternative to the Detroit Three, and it comes in the form of the TRD Pro. Color can do a lot to a vehicle such as making an older model look modern or highlighting some of the polarizing elements of a design. This Army Green paint, which is new on all TRD Pros for 2020 makes the Tundra look younger and a bit more aggressive. Inside, you can tell that the Tundra is getting up there in age. The design hasn’t changed much and material quality cannot even compare to the likes of GM and Ram’s trucks. But I like the large buttons and knobs for various controls. Not only does it make it easier to find, but it means you can have a set of gloves on and easily control various aspects. One key improvement for 2020 is Apple CarPlay and Android Auto being added to the Tundra’s Entune system, which gives drivers another choice in their infotainment choices. The Crewmax model seen here is huge. Step into the back seat and you might think you entered a limo with an endless amount of head and legroom on offer. I do wish the seats had a little bit more padding. Only one engine is available on the 2020 Tundra; a 5.7L V8 with 381 horsepower and 401 pound-feet of torque. This is teamed with a six-speed automatic and four-wheel drive. This engine provides plenty of thrust and provides an engine burble that you might expect from one of the Detroit three’s V8 trucks. The automatic is very smooth when changing gear and seems to where it needs to be in any situation. The downside to this V8 is fuel economy. The EPA says TRD Pro CrewMax will return 13 City/17 Highway/14 Combined. I saw an average of 14.2 mpg during my week of a 60/40 mix of highway and city driving. Maybe a couple more gears for the automatic could improve this. Toyota has kitted the Tundra TRD Pro with some serious off-road chops; Fox internal bypass dampers for all four corners, TRD springs that increase wheel travel, and a set of Michelin LTX off-road tires. Unfortunately, I didn’t get a chance to try it off-road. But other reviewers who have taken it off the beaten path report the TRD Pro is very capable. What I can report is the changes to the suspension makes for a surprisingly comfortable ride. This suspension does mean you will experience a fair amount of body roll when cornering, but that is to be expected with a truck like this. My Tundra TRD Pro CrewMax starts at $52,780. With some accessories and destination, the price climbs $55,020. The Tundra is getting long in the tooth as evidenced by the interior and poor fuel economy from the V8 engine. But the TRD Pro helps freshen the Tundra a bit and makes a compelling option for those who plan on spending more time off the beaten path. Disclaimer: Toyota Provided the Tundra, Insurance, and One Tank of Gas Year: 2020 Make: Toyota Model: Tundra Trim: TRD Pro CrewMax Engine: 5.7L DOHC 32-Valve i-FORCE V8 Driveline: Six-Speed Automatic, Four-Wheel Drive Horsepower @ RPM: 381 @ 5,600 Torque @ RPM: 401 @ 3,600 Fuel Economy: City/Highway/Combined - 13/17/14 Curb Weight: N/A Location of Manufacture: San Antonio, TX Base Price: $52,780 As Tested Price: $55,020 (Includes $1,495.00 Destination Charge) Options: Chrome Tube Steps - $535.00 Stainless Steel Door Edge Guard - $140.00 Door Sill Protector - $70.00
  3. It seems America isn't the only place that is interested in the Toyota Tundra. CarAdvice.com.au reports there is “enormous demand” for the Tundra in Australia. Speaking with Tony Cramb, Toyota AU's executive director of sales and marketing said there was room for a larger truck. But there are two key items withholding the Tundra from the Australian marketplace. “We have an enormous demand for a Tundra here in Australia, there’s no doubt if we could get a diesel Tundra, then I think we’d sell 100 a month. But regrettably because it’s manufactured in the States, it’s unlikely to happen that way," said Cramb “… We’ve had strong requests at dealer meetings to get the Tundra here, and we have made representation. But when it comes down to it, because it’s not LHD here, and because it’s petrol, in the end it’s very hard to make the case.” For now, those who are interested in buying a Tundra in Australia can visit an importer and pick up one for around 120,000 AUD (about $94,000). Source: CarAdvice.com.au View full article
  4. It seems America isn't the only place that is interested in the Toyota Tundra. CarAdvice.com.au reports there is “enormous demand” for the Tundra in Australia. Speaking with Tony Cramb, Toyota AU's executive director of sales and marketing said there was room for a larger truck. But there are two key items withholding the Tundra from the Australian marketplace. “We have an enormous demand for a Tundra here in Australia, there’s no doubt if we could get a diesel Tundra, then I think we’d sell 100 a month. But regrettably because it’s manufactured in the States, it’s unlikely to happen that way," said Cramb “… We’ve had strong requests at dealer meetings to get the Tundra here, and we have made representation. But when it comes down to it, because it’s not LHD here, and because it’s petrol, in the end it’s very hard to make the case.” For now, those who are interested in buying a Tundra in Australia can visit an importer and pick up one for around 120,000 AUD (about $94,000). Source: CarAdvice.com.au
  5. Back in August, we reported that Toyota was possibly considering dropping in a diesel for its full-size Tundra pickup. "The diesel engine is something that is on our evaluation list. Hybrid technology is something that is on our evaluation list. Either one of those alternatives could deliver some pretty good real world fuel economy,"said Rick LoFaso, Toyota's corporate manager for light trucks. "I think Cummins would bring instant name recognition and obviously they are a leader in diesel engine technology. That is not the first time we would have a tie up with somebody else." Well it seems Toyota has possibly made a decision and is turning to Cummins for help. Wards Auto reports that when the next-generation Tundra debuts in 2016, it will be available with a 5.0L turbodiesel V8 from Cummins. This is the same engine you'll find in the next-generation Titan. What's unclear is if the Tundra's version will have the same 300+ horsepower and 500+ pound-feet of torque as the Titan. A source tells Wards that the Cummins engine is a possible placeholder as Toyota would use this to gauge customer reactions and see if it would be a good idea to restart their own diesel engine project. Back in 2007, the automaker was working on a diesel for the Tundra. However when the economy hit the fan in 2008, Toyota canned the project. Source: Wards Auto William Maley is a staff writer for Cheers & Gears. He can be reached at william.maley@cheersandgears.com or you can follow him on twitter at @realmudmonster.
  6. Back in August, we reported that Toyota was possibly considering dropping in a diesel for its full-size Tundra pickup. "The diesel engine is something that is on our evaluation list. Hybrid technology is something that is on our evaluation list. Either one of those alternatives could deliver some pretty good real world fuel economy,"said Rick LoFaso, Toyota's corporate manager for light trucks. "I think Cummins would bring instant name recognition and obviously they are a leader in diesel engine technology. That is not the first time we would have a tie up with somebody else." Well it seems Toyota has possibly made a decision and is turning to Cummins for help. Wards Auto reports that when the next-generation Tundra debuts in 2016, it will be available with a 5.0L turbodiesel V8 from Cummins. This is the same engine you'll find in the next-generation Titan. What's unclear is if the Tundra's version will have the same 300+ horsepower and 500+ pound-feet of torque as the Titan. A source tells Wards that the Cummins engine is a possible placeholder as Toyota would use this to gauge customer reactions and see if it would be a good idea to restart their own diesel engine project. Back in 2007, the automaker was working on a diesel for the Tundra. However when the economy hit the fan in 2008, Toyota canned the project. Source: Wards Auto William Maley is a staff writer for Cheers & Gears. He can be reached at william.maley@cheersandgears.com or you can follow him on twitter at @realmudmonster. View full article
  7. William Maley Staff Writer - CheersandGears.com August 31, 2013 Nissan sent everyone in a tizzy a couple weeks ago when they announced that next-generation Titan pickup would be packing Cummins 5.0L turbodiesel V8. This has one automaker wondering if they should do the same thing. Edmunds talked with Rick LoFaso, Toyota's corporate manager for light trucks. LoFaso said the company is looking into two different powertrains to boos the fuel economy in the Tundra. One of those happens to be diesel. "The diesel engine is something that is on our evaluation list. Hybrid technology is something that is on our evaluation list. Either one of those alternatives could deliver some pretty good real world fuel economy," said LoFaso. LoFaso went onto say, "I think Cummins would bring instant name recognition and obviously they are a leader in diesel engine technology. That is not the first time we would have a tie up with somebody else." No mention on when a decision would be made. Source: Edmunds William Maley is a staff writer for Cheers & Gears. He can be reached at william.maley@cheersandgears.com or you can follow him on twitter at @realmudmonster.
  8. William Maley Staff Writer - CheersandGears.com August 31, 2013 Nissan sent everyone in a tizzy a couple weeks ago when they announced that next-generation Titan pickup would be packing Cummins 5.0L turbodiesel V8. This has one automaker wondering if they should do the same thing. Edmunds talked with Rick LoFaso, Toyota's corporate manager for light trucks. LoFaso said the company is looking into two different powertrains to boos the fuel economy in the Tundra. One of those happens to be diesel. "The diesel engine is something that is on our evaluation list. Hybrid technology is something that is on our evaluation list. Either one of those alternatives could deliver some pretty good real world fuel economy," said LoFaso. LoFaso went onto say, "I think Cummins would bring instant name recognition and obviously they are a leader in diesel engine technology. That is not the first time we would have a tie up with somebody else." No mention on when a decision would be made. Source: Edmunds William Maley is a staff writer for Cheers & Gears. He can be reached at william.maley@cheersandgears.com or you can follow him on twitter at @realmudmonster. View full article

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