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    William Maley

    Mitsubishi Teases A New Crossover To Slot Between Outlander Sport and Outlander

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      Guys! Mitsubishi is showing off a new vehicle!


    It has been quite awhile since we have reported on an all-new model from Mitsubishi. But that will be changing in March as the Japanese automaker will debut a new crossover that will slot between the Outlander Sport and Outlander.

    The new model looks very familiar to the XR-PHEV and XR-PHEV II concepts with a sharply raked roofline and tailgate, bold character line along the side, and headlights extending to the fenders.

    For Europe, we're expecting a range of gas and diesel engines. The U.S. version will get a turbocharged four-cylinder according to Mitsubishi Motors North America COO Don Swearingen to Motor1 earlier this month.

    We'll have more details on Mitsubishi's new crossover when it debuts at the Geneva Motor Show.

    Source: Mitsubishi, Motor1
    Press Release is on Page 2


    All-New Mitsubishi SUV to Debut At 2017 Geneva Motor Show

    The forthcoming 2017 Geneva Motor Show marks a turning point for Mitsubishi Motors Corporation (MMC) with the world premiere of its latest SUV - the first of a new generation of Mitsubishi Motors vehicles.

    With its striking design, the sporty, coupe-like SUV will line up alongside the Mitsubishi ASX and Mitsubishi Outlander to broaden the brand’s model range and introduce a whole new audience to Mitsubishi Motors, a name long associated with stylish, tough and extremely capable SUVs and 4X4s.

    Sharper in its expression than a conventional coupe, this new, compact SUV will feature highly chamfered contours with a wedge-shaped belt line and a distinctive V-line in the rear quarter stemming from the forward-slanted C-pillar and the chunky, muscular rear fenders.

    The all-new Mitsubishi SUV will make its global debut on the Mitsubishi stand at the Geneva Motor Show (Hall 2, Stand 2130) on March 7 2017.

    Edited by William Maley

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    It is a CUV world we live in, I do not expect to be wowed or surprised, I have a feeling it will be a average auto that will sell.

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    i've always liked the outlander sport, except its powertrains are a bit underwhelming.  the outlander is a tremendous value for the price, and is very spacious, but the styling is a turd.

    outlander sport is a great counter punch to a Chevy trax, but may not be perceived as large as say, an Escape.  Methinks this new model may be a better fit to compete with the Escape etc.

     

    Then the graying Outlander Sport can take over for the Lancer at the base of the model lineup.  They can discount the sport because its old and ask more $$$$ for the new model because its new.

    Mits can compete so much better if they can play to the CUV segment rather than sedans and hot hatches etc.  Things like the lower prices and 7 year warranty factor so much more into purchase decisions then.

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      If you want to know what was going to be shown at Geneva, Roadshow has put up a guide detailing the various debuts.
      Source: Automotive News (Subscription Required), Geneva Motor Show


      THE GENEVA INTERNATIONAL MOTOR SHOW IS CANCELLED!
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      A few days before the opening of the event, the construction of the stands was very nearly complete. A week ago, during the press conferences announcing the 2020 edition, there was nothing to suggest that such a measure was necessary. The situation changed with the appearance of the first confirmed coronavirus diseases in Switzerland and the injonction of the Federal Council on 28.02.2020. The event is cancelled due to this decision.
      In the meantime, the dismantling of the event will now have to be organised. The financial consequences for all those involved in the event are significant and will need to be assessed over the coming weeks. One thing is certain: tickets already purchased for the event will be refunded. The organisers will communicate about this as soon as possible, via their website.

      View full article
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