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    2017 Audi TT RS Boasts 400 Horsepower

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      Audi's TT gets more powerful


    Audi chose the Beijing Auto Show to reveal the 2017 TT RS family. Offered in coupe and roadster, the TT RS boasts a new 2.5L TFSI five-cylinder engine with 400 horsepower and 354 pound-feet of torque. Compared the old TT RS, the 2.5L boasts 40 more horsepower and 11 more pound-feet. This engine only comes paired with a seven-speed dual-clutch transmission and Audi's quattro all-wheel drive.

     

    The TT RS coupe can hit 62 mph in 3.7 seconds while the roadster does it in 3.9 seconds. Here is an interesting fact, the TT RS coupe is only 0.2 seconds slower than the current Audi R8 to 62 mph. Top speed stands at 155 mph, but can be increased to 174 mph through an option that removes the limiter.

     

    The suspension has been lowered by 10 millimeters and you can option a set of adaptive dampers with magnetic ride technology. 19-inch wheels and a set large brakes come standard. A set of 20-inch wheels and carbon-fiber ceramic brake discs are on the options list.

     

    Outside, the TT RS features a more aggressive body kit with larger air vents on the bumper, rear wing, side skirts, and carbon fiber side mirrors.

     

    Audi will launch the TT RS this fall in Europe. No word when we'll see it in North America, but it would be safe to assume it would be sometime next year.

     

     

    Source: Audi

     

    Press Release is on Page 2


     

    Stronger than ever: new Audi TT RS Coupé and new Audi TT RS Roadster

    • Impressive: new aluminum five-cylinder engine with 294 kW (400 hp)
    • Available for the first time in a series-production Audi: OLED rear lights
    • Controls like a racing car: numerous functions on the RS sport steering wheel


    The sound: inimitable five-cylinder. The performance: tremendous at 294 kW (400 hp). The traction: inexhaustible thanks to quattro drive. As the sporty spearhead of the TT series, the new TT RS* is to be marketed under the Audi Sport label. At the Beijing Motor Show, Audi is presenting its Coupé and its Roadster for the first time to the world’s public. Sales in Europe will begin in fall 2016.

     


    “The new aluminum five-cylinder engine delivers 400 hp, which is 60 hp more than its predecessor,” says Dr.-Ing. Stefan Knirsch, Audi Board Member for Technical Development. “Together with the quattro drive, it ensures sporty driving pleasure with maximum traction. Audi uses Matrix OLED technology in the rear lights for the first time.”

     

    Impressive performance: the new five-cylinder engine
    A jury of international motor journalists has voted the 2.5 TFSI “Engine of the Year” six times in a row. Now Audi has further developed the five-cylinder engine in all areas – with lightweight construction measures, reduced internal friction and increased power delivery. As a result, the turbo engine gains a good 17 percent increase in performance at an unchanged capacity of 2,480 cc. At 294 kW (400 hp), it is more powerful than ever before. The maximum torque of 480 Nm (354.0 lb-ft) is available between 1,700 and 5,850 rpm. It ensures fantastic pulling power, which accompanies the unmistakable sound. Cylinders positioned directly beside each other and far away from each other fire in alternation. This brings with it a very special rhythm. The TT RS Coupé accelerates from 0 to 100 km/h (0 to 62.1 mph) in 3.7 seconds, the Roadster in 3.9 seconds – this corresponds to the level of a supercar. Audi regulates the top speed at 250 km/h (155.3 mph), or at 280 km/h (173.9 mph) upon request.

     

    For the best traction and plenty of driving pleasure: the quattro drive
    The forces of the 2.5 TFSI engine flow via a seven-speed S tronic, which shifts at lightning speed, to the quattro permanent all-wheel drive. Its multi-plate clutch distributes the power freely between the axles. This provides strong grip and immense driving pleasure. The wheel-selective torque control makes handling even more agile and safe. Using the Audi drive select system, the driver can influence the quattro drive and other components such as the steering, S tronic, engine characteristic and exhaust flaps. The four modes available for this are comfort, auto, dynamic, and individual.

     

    Pure dynamics: the chassis
    In addition to its light weight, the Audi TT RS has its sporty chassis to thank for its outstanding handling. The direct steering provides close contact with the road and makes it a pleasure to drive challenging winding stretches. At the front axle, ventilated and perforated steel discs are in action behind the 19-inch wheels – or 20-inch forged lightweight wheels as an option. Alternatively, lighter and particularly abrasion-resistant carbon-fiber ceramic discs are available. At the back, a steel monoblock disc is used. As an option, Audi supplies RS sport suspension plus adaptive dampers in magnetic ride technology. In this case, the damping characteristics can be influenced electronically. The control technology is integrated into the driving dynamics system known as Audi drive select.

     

    New feature: Matrix OLED lights
    For the first time in a series-production Audi, Matrix OLED technology (organic light emitting diode) is used in the rear lights as an option. These emit an extremely homogeneous, high-contrast light. The light can be continuously dimmed, it does not cast any shadows and does not require any reflectors – this makes the OLEDs in 3D design efficient, light and visually impressive. Each rear light contains four wafer-thin units which become smaller from the inside out. The biggest bears the TT logo and the four Audi rings. The TT RS has LED rear lights and LED headlights as standard. Alternatively, the latter are available as intelligently controlled Matrix LED units.

     

    Athletically streamlined: the exterior design
    Large air inlets, a Singleframe grille with a newly designed honeycomb grille and quattro logo, a fixed rear wing and two large, oval exhaust tailpipes – the new TT RS Coupé and the new TT RS Roadster exude concentrated power. Along the flanks, aerodynamically-shaped side sills emphasize the dynamic design. Both models measure 4.19 meters (13.9 ft) in length, 1.83 meters (6 ft) in width and 1.34 meters (4.5 ft) in height.

     

    Inspired by racing cars: the cockpit
    Controls and display in the new TT RS are focused completely on the driver. All information is displayed as standard on the fully digital Audi virtual cockpit with 12.3-inch screen. The driver can choose from three views, including a special RS screen that highlights the rev counter and provides information on tire pressure, torque, and g‑force, among other things. The Audi virtual cockpit also displays a shift light which informs the driver that the engine speed limit has been reached. For the first time in the RS portfolio, the RS sport leather steering wheel with shift paddles has two operating satellite buttons for turning the engine on and off as well as the driving dynamics system known as Audi drive select, in addition to multifunction buttons. This means that the driver’s hands stay on the wheel at all times. The driver can influence the exhaust flap control via the sound button on the center console.

     

    Best entertainment: infotainment and Audi connect
    Audi also offers a huge amount of high-end infotainment technology. The options include MMI navigation plus with MMI touch including free text search and natural voice control, as well as the Audi connect online module with Wi-Fi hotspot. Using Audi phone box, compatible cell phones can be charged inductively and paired with the onboard antennae for optimal reception. The new Audi smartphone interface technology displays selected apps from the cell phone directly in the Audi virtual cockpit. The Bang & Olufsen sound system is a highlight for fans of excellent acoustics.

     

    Golden Fall: market launch
    The new TT RS models will be launched on the European market in fall 2016. The Coupé prices start at 66,400 euros, the Roadster is listed at 69,200 euros.

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    Clearly family tweaked to match the rest of the auto line up. Not a fan of these 5 cylinder turbo motors with high HP and lower torque. To much proof that you can have lighter engines with better Torque and equal HP. DOHC design just does not win me over. Reason why I have never been won over as a fan of asian auto's for the most part. Same with Euro auto's, while I like some of the body styles, not a fan of most Euro engines.

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    • By Anthony Fongaro
      Germany. Known for impeccable engineering, German vehicles usually have cutting-edge technology and are status symbols. Sweden. The Swedish are known for safety, and even though the only brand from Sweden is Volvo, they want to have a sleek design while making vehicles easy to drive. South Korea. In my opinion, South Korea is doing a great job with their vehicles. Creating Genesis as a stand-alone brand was genius because they can have vehicles close to or competing with the Germans while costing thousands of dollars less.
      What vehicles did I choose from these three countries? First, we have the Genesis G70. The particular G70 I am talking about is the G70 3.3T. It can compete directly with the Germans in terms of performance and safety features. Next, we have the Volvo S60 T6. It ties the Audi S5 Sportback in terms of exterior and interior looks and follows the tradition of being a Swedish car that focuses on safety which a hint of performance. The powertrain may be a little odd, but I’ll discuss engines and performance later. The black sheep here is a used Audi S5 Sportback? Why this car and not an S4? Simple, the S4 is too plain. The S5 Sportback is a good-looking car with performance similar to the Genesis, but a new one’s cost puts it in a different bracket.
      There is a reason why I’m using these vehicles. Price and performance. First, price. Options I look for such as blind-spot monitoring, adaptive cruise control, digital displays, all-wheel-drive, and heated/ventilated seats push up the prices for these three from $50,000-$53,000. Although the G70 and Volvo can be bought for around $40,000, a few options bump their prices up. Let’s dive into what I recommend for each car.
      Not a surprise, the Genesis G70 comes in at $50,000. You can get a Sport Package, but I would go with the Prestige Package because it has a heads-up display, surround-view monitoring that makes parking easy, and advanced safety features with a feature to not his pedestrians. That last feature is very helpful in a city like Chicago with Chicagoans crossing the street anywhere. 
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      All vehicles have a sports feature that can change the noise of the engine inside, change how the steering feels, and how much more the engine will rev. If you’re into engine and exhaust noise, the Genesis is king. It is also the most powerful and feels the sportiest when going around a bend or going onto an on-ramp or wolfram. The Volvo has the worst sounding engine and there is a lot of lag because of the unusual engine. Volvo only uses 2.0-liter engines and it really hurts in terms of performance and it is more about cruising than going on twisty curves. Audi’s S5 Sportback is like the G70 in terms of engine noise and performance. Both are quick with V6 engines. In the Audi, the engine sounds good, but the steering feels disconnected. It handles alright but doesn’t feel special.

      Interior and infotainment systems are where the Genesis fall behind. The interior does feel luxurious, but the Volvo crushes it. A small infotainment system does it no justice. Volvo’s interior is gorgeous, but the infotainment system does something I hate: it controls almost everything. Why can’t there be regular controls for the climate control? Audi uses digital dials which are simply amazing and it has the best infotainment system. 
      Now we get to what the title implies: Who should get which car?
      Genesis G70 3.3T: This is the car you get if you are all about those stats and performance. The interior may be lacking a bit, but the standard features make up for that downfall. Its exterior styling is a bit bland so style gurus will want to look elsewhere. Otherwise, this is a wonderful job and I think Genesis should be proud. 8/10
      Volvo S60 T6: Simply put, this isn’t a sports sedan. Instead, it is a great long-distance cruiser with so many safety features it can almost drive itself. It has the best looking exterior and interior, but the infotainment system and droning engine let it down. Volvo is doing an amazing job creating beautiful looking vehicles, but I wish they didn’t only use 2.0-liter engines. 7/10
      Audi S5 Sportback: New, it’s the most expensive but as a used car, you can get one for a little over $50,000 with around 30,000 miles. Why get this? Because it’s all about that badge, baby! It does have a great interior and the best infotainment system. It ties the Volvo for a beautiful exterior as well. If you can find one as a certified pre-owned vehicle or CPO, you can save about $10,000. 8/10

      My personal favorite part: It’s performance facts time!
      Genesis G70 3.3T: Turbocharged 3.3-liter V6. Stats: 365 HP and 376-pound feet of torque. 0-60: 4.5 seconds.
      Volvo T6: Turbocharged and supercharged 2.0-liter incline 4. Stats: 316 HP and 295-pound feet of torque. 0-60: 5.9 seconds.
      Audi S5 Sportback: Turbocharged 3.0-liter V6.  349 HP and 369-pound feet of torque. 0-60: 4.5 seconds. 
      What is your opinion? Which car do you think would suit you, and do you own the Audi, Genesis, or Volvo? Leave a comment below.
       
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