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    Jaguar, Land Rover Looking To Slash A Number Of Platforms


    William Maley

    Staff Writer - CheersandGears.com

    November 20, 2012

    Here’s a question for you: How many platforms do Jaguar and Land Rover have? The answer is seven. Yes, seven platforms. They go as followed,

    • Jaguar XF
    • Jaguar XJ
    • Jaguar XK/F-Type
    • Land Rover Defender
    • Land Rover Freelander (LR2)/Range Rover Evoque
    • Land Rover Discovery (LR4)/Range Rover Sport
    • Range Rover

    So in a not surprising move, Jaguar and Land Rover is looking at cutting down their platforms from seven down to two to three as a way to save money.

    Autocar reports that Jaguar-Land Rover is looking towards Volkswagen MQB platform as a case study to how do something like this.

    “It won’t happen overnight. (Something like) VW’s MQB platform will take seven years to roll out across the models it will underpin,” said Jaguar’s global brand director, Adrian Hallmark.

    Source: Autocar

    William Maley is a staff writer for Cheers & Gears. He can be reached at william.maley@cheersandgears.com or you can follow him on twitter at @realmudmonster.

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    just as long as they don't start platform sharing with Tata...

    If they do the engineering, then Tata has a winner! It all boils down to perspective :AH-HA:

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    This is what FORD should have done long ago. Forced them to go to a Universal Platform! One to Control them all and have an efficient cost worthy base to build a wide variety of Fun Jag's for the world. :P

    Happy Holidays All :D

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