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    LAPD To Put Tesla Model S On Patrol


    • Bad Boys, Whatcha gonna do when A Tesla Model S Police Car Rolls Up?

    Last year, Tesla gave the Los Angeles Police Department two Model S P85Ds to evaluate for possible duty as a police vehicle. It seems the LAPD were impressed that they have decided to equip one of the two models to duty as a patrol vehicle.

    NBC affiliate KNBC in Los Angeles reports that the LAPD is working with Tesla on an agreement to equip one of the Model Ss with the equipment needed for patrol duty - radios, computer, custody cage, and locking shotgun rack.

    "They will have an active role equipping this vehicle," said Vartan Yegiyan, LAPD's assistant commander of the Administrative Services Bureau - the group that oversees the vehicles of the department.

    Once equipped, the Model S will be put to the test with doing patrol work and possibly as a high-speed pursuit vehicle.

    No matter how the Model S fares in this test, it is still an expensive proposition for the department. Depending on the configuration, a Model S can upwards over $130,000 - this is before it is fitted with all the equipment needed for a police vehicle. The LAPD believes it could be about five years before they seriously consider replacing their conventional patrol vehicles with electrics.

    Source: KNBC
    Pic Credit: LAPD HQ on Twitter

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    The Model S would make a great police car due to the speed, interior space, and limited maintenance needs, however look at the cost.  Since Tesla gave them the car it isn't costing them anything, but to buy 100 or 200 cars at $100,000 each is going to piss off tax payers.  Imagine if they bought Range Rover or S-class police cars, that would tick people off.  Maybe when Tesla Model 3 arrives and they can get a $45,000 sedan or the Model Y crossover, then it becomes a viable option.

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    I think these are meant to be pursuit vehicles... not just trundle around on patrol that any old W-Body Impala could accomplish.  As such, their numbers in the fleet would be limited. 

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    Even still, they could buy pursuit Porsche 911's for cheaper.  They can't spend $100k on police cars.  When you can get a Tesla (or any electric car) for under $50k then I think they make a great police car.

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    6 hours ago, Drew Dowdell said:

    Fire an EMP?

    That'll stink for the States when Clintons " Open Borders " has Iranian terrorists easily slipping in and setting off EMP's so the Feds and PD's can't pursue them to their actual target(s) 

    ;)

     

    Edited by FordCosworth
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    8 hours ago, FordCosworth said:

    That'll stink for the States when Clintons " Open Borders " has Iranian terrorists easily slipping in and setting off EMP's so the Feds and PD's can't pursue them to their actual target(s) 

    ;)

     

    Doubtful this will actually happen.

    1 hour ago, ocnblu said:

    Serious waste of taxpayer dollars.

    Just the opposite.

    13 hours ago, Drew Dowdell said:

    I think these are meant to be pursuit vehicles... not just trundle around on patrol that any old W-Body Impala could accomplish.  As such, their numbers in the fleet would be limited. 

    Limited for now, but given the severe service duty and mechanical simplicity of electric vehicles, I could see this becoming the norm in ten years or so.

    Municipalities already use electric vehicles for meter maids and meter readers for electric and gas utilities, This would be ideal for a neighborhood patrol also.

    I work for a university and our department of public safety sues Fusion police package vehicles for patrol  For something like patrolling our campus, which is one city block long and one city block deep, a Tesla or Bolt makes infinite sense. 8 hours with an average speed of 15 miles an hour would make an electric car darn near immortal.

    Plus, you would not need to send an officer off campus to get fuel, giving you more coverage to protect students.

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