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    2017 Toyota Tacoma TRD Pro To Start At $41,700*


    • Getting into a 2017 Tacoma TRD Pro will cost you dearly


    If you want the most off-road capable Toyota Tacoma, then you'll be happy to hear the 2017 Tacoma TRD Pro will be arriving at dealers next months. But it will cost you a fair chunk of cash.

     

    The 2017 Tacoma TRD Pro will carry a base price of $41,700 (includes a $940 destination charge). This nets you an off-road package that includes FOX 2.5 internal bypass shocks, new front springs with a 1-inch lift, and a revised rear suspension with progressive leaf-springs. The exterior features a retro Toyota grille, new head and taillights, front skid plate, and a set of 16-inch wheels wrapped in Kevlar-reinforced off-road tires.

     

    Power comes from a 3.5L V6 with 278 horsepower. The V6 in the TRD Pro features a larger alternator, and coolers for the oil and power-steering. A six-speed manual comes standard, while a six-speed automatic is optional. No matter which transmission you choose, you'll get a part-time four-wheel drive system. Models with the manual transmission A-TRAC 4WD traction control system that modulates power to all four wheels without cutting the throttle. Opt for the automatic and you'll get Crawl Control that manages the throttle and brakes to maintain movement at one of five speed settings.

     

    Source: Toyota

     

    Press Release is on Page 2


     

    Toyota Releases Pricing for All-New 2017 Tacoma TRD Pro

     

    TORRANCE, Calif., August 2, 2016 - - It’s dirtier than ever and it’s coming soon! It’s the highly anticipated return of the all-new Toyota Tacoma TRD Pro! Whether tackling treacherous snow-covered terrain, driving off the beaten path, or surviving extreme conditions where roads fear to tread, the adrenaline-pumping Tacoma TRD Pro will be up for any challenge.

     

    Based on the ninth-generation Toyota Tacoma pickup that launched last fall, the Tacoma TRD Pro will start getting down and dirty when it reaches dealerships later this month.

     

    The Toyota Tacoma rejoins the 2017 model year TRD Pro family with all-new factory-installed off-road equipment designed by the experts at Toyota Racing Development (TRD) to make it EVEN MORE off-road capable than before.

     

    Aimed squarely at extreme off-roading enthusiasts who know the value of body-on-frame construction, and challenge themselves and their trucks and SUV’s in some of the harshest conditions, the new 2017 Tacoma TRD Pro will raise the bar on TRD Pro performance. Courtesy of TRD, the new Tacoma TRD Pro will add an array of new performance equipment and features, making this a truly next-generation TRD Pro product, and the new benchmark for challenging off-road terrain.

     


    Extreme Exterior for Extreme Performance
    The 2017 Tacoma TRD Pro is designed to not only look tough, but to perform in the toughest off-road environment. Based on the Tacoma TRD Off-Road 4x4 Double Cab Short Bed model in either 6-speed manual (with clutch start-cancel switch) or 6-speed automatic transmission, the new Tacoma TRD Pro will be available in three exterior colors: Cement, Barcelona Red Metallic, and Super White. The exterior of each Tacoma TRD Pro model will also include:

    • 16-inch TRD black alloy wheels with Goodyear Wrangler® All-Terrain Kevlar®-reinforced tires
    • TRD Pro aluminum front skid plate
    • Rigid Industries® LED fog lights
    • New projector-beam headlights with black bezels, LED Daytime Running Lights (DRL), and auto on/off feature
    • New taillights with black bezels
    • TRD Pro badge on front door with diamond-pattern knurled finish
    • Black TRD Pro and 4x4 rear tailgate badging


    Each Tacoma TRD Pro will also come equipped with a heritage-inspired TOYOTA front grille with color-keyed surround, blacked out hood scoop and graphic, color-keyed power outside mirrors with turn signal indicators, color-keyed door handles, black overfenders, and a color-keyed rear bumper.

     

    Interior Sportiness Combined with Convenience Technology
    Driving a truck designed for harsh off-road conditions does not mean you also have to live without riding in comfort or the latest safety and convenience technologies. The new Tacoma TRD Pro combines performance and convenience with standard features that include:

    • Black TRD Pro leather-trimmed heated front seats with TRD Pro logo located on the headrests
    • Leather-trimmed tilt/telescopic steering wheel with audio and Bluetooth® hands-free phone controls
    • Entune™ Premium Audio with Integrated Navigation and App Suite
    • New for 17MY power sliding rear window with privacy glass
    • TRD shift knob
    • TRD Pro floor mats
    • Rear parking assist sonar
    • Blind Spot Monitor (BSM) and Rear Cross-Traffic Alert (RCTA)


    The new Tacoma TRD Pro also includes an analog instrumentation that features a 4.2-inch color Multi-Information Display (MID) with an integrated inclinometer and tilt gauge. The MID also has outside temperature, odometer, tripmeters, and average fuel economy.

     

    As in all Tacoma models, a GoPro® mount is located on the windshield for serious off-roaders who like to document their exploits with GoPro® HERO cameras.

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    User Feedback


    Sounds like a very capable truck, just ouch for the price tag. Then again I am sure GM when it releases their Chevy version of the midsize truck to compete will also be similarly priced for gas or about 3500 more if diesel.

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      Down the road, Volvo plans on launching other versions of the 40 Series such as a hatchback. 
      Also launching this year is the second-generation XC60. This is an important model for Volvo as it is their most popular model.
      “The XC60 is our biggest-volume car that sells broadly in Europe, China and America. It brings significant profits so is crucial in many aspects. [The new model is] a fantastic car, a big step forward,” said Green.
      Source: Autocar

      View full article
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