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    William Maley

    Spying: A Subcompact Crossover For Either Toyota or Scion

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      Toyota Is Working On A Subcompact Crossover, But Who Will Get It?

    It seems not a day goes by without someone saying that 'crossovers are the hot thing'. Yes, we are part of this group. Just consider the automakers who are currently selling a subcompact; Chevrolet Trax, Honda HR-V, Jeep Renegade, Mazda CX-3, and Nissan Juke. There is one automaker missing from this list, Toyota. However, the Japanese automaker could be joining in the near future.

     

    A spy photographer caught a fully camouflaged Toyota subcompact crossover testing in the deserts of the American southwest. The overall shape seems to inspired from the C-HR concept shown at the Paris Motor show last year. Comparing the two, we can see some similarities such as a long hood and sloping roofline.

     

    The subcompact crossover will use a new modular platform and come with a turbocharged four-cylinder with a CVT. No word if a manual transmission will be on offer.

     

    One item still up in the air is whether or not this subcompact crossover will be sold as a Toyota or Scion in the U.S. Some believe it could be destined for Scion as some of the photos show a xB following the test mule.

     

    Another item that is not known at this time, when we will see the subcompact in production form.

     

    Source: Autoblog

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