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  • William Maley
    William Maley

    The Brief: Closing Out the 2015 Reviews (Part 1)

      Closing out 2015 with the final reviews of vehicles from this year

    The end of another year is upon us and I’m in the process of picking my favorite vehicles from the year. But before we get to that, I need to give some vehicles their time in the review spotlight. Trying to crank a review or a two a week is a hard task for some folks, myself included. I tend to spend a week with a vehicle, driving it in my daily routine, taking notes and photos, and hopefully beginning the review before the vehicle leaves. But that last part is the thickest part as it doesn’t always work out because of life. Whether it's a personal or family emergency, vacation, changes in work, or just being distracted, life always finds a way to get in and mess up whatever you are trying to do.

     

    Towards the end of every year, I have a small number of vehicles that have fallen between the cracks and are just waiting for me to find them and write something up. This year is no different as seven vehicles have been waiting patiently for their turn and their time has come. We're going to be looking at the first four of the seven.

     

    For this piece, I’ll be listing the good and bad of each vehicle, along with some notes that I took on each vehicle.

     

    2016 Acura ILX A-Spec
    2.4L 16-Valve, DOHC i-VTEC Four-Cylinder (201 Horsepower, 180 Pound-Feet of Torque)
    Eight-Speed Dual-Clutch Automatic
    Base/As-Tested: $31,830/$32,830

     

    Cheers: Excellent handling in the corners, improved styling, large back seat
    Jeers: Engine has to be worked hard, a large amount of wind and road noise, bouncy ride, questionable material choice, poor value when compared to competitors.

     

    Notes: Acura went back to the drawing board this year with the ILX in an effort to fix the slumping sales of the model. Some of the fixes do make a difference such as a new front clip and headlights that give some much need aggression. Inside, a set of leather and suede seats add a nice touch and provide good comfort. It should be noted the seats come with the A-Spec package. The engine lineup which included a 2.0L, 2.4L, and hybrid has been simplified to just the 2.4 with 201 horsepower. This eliminates one of the big problems for the ILX of being too slow if you opted for the hybrid or 2.0L. One item that Acura didn’t mess with was the handling. The ILX is a sweetheart around corners as it provides minimal body roll and excellent steering. Acura also made sure that the ILX’s suspension was compliant when dealing with bumps on a day-to-day basis, something it does very well.

     

    Sadly, that is where the good points of the ILX end. Despite Acura’s attempt on improving the ILX’s interior, it looks and in some parts, feels like the Civic that it is based on. Not something you want to be said since this vehicle competes in the same class as the Audi A3 and Buick Verano, both with impressive interiors. The 2.4L has the power to compete with the vehicles in the class. But to access this power, you’ll need to be working the engine somewhat hard - around 3,000 to 4,000 rpm. This would be ok if the ILX had a six-speed manual. But Acura dropped it for this year, replacing it with an eight-speed dual-clutch automatic. There isn’t anything wrong with the dual-clutch transmission, it’s quite smooth and doesn’t hesitate when going up or down. But it makes working the engine to its fullest, boring and not joyful.

     

    But the biggest problem for the ILX is the price. This particular ILX came with an as-tested price of $32,830 and that doesn’t include one of the huge changes for the model, a load of additional safety equipment. Acura added a number of safety systems such as blind-spot monitoring, rear cross traffic alert, adaptive cruise control, collision mitigation, and road departure mitigation. To get all of this, you need to either get the ILX Technology Plus ($32,990) or the ILX Technology Plus and A-Spec ($34,890). Around that price, you could get yourself into a well-equipped Buick Verano Turbo with much more amenities and better performance.

     

    2015 Jeep Cherokee Trailhawk
    3.2L 24-Valve VVT V6 (271 Horsepower, 239 Pound-Feet of Torque)
    Nine-Speed Automatic
    Base/As-Tested: $30,395/$36,869

     

    Cheers: Sharp Looks, Very Capable Off-Road, V6 Performance
    Jeers: Ninth-Gear Seems Non-Existent, Price-Tag, Annoying Stop-Start System

     

    Notes: In my original review of the 2014 Jeep Cherokee, I said that I was very impressed as Jeep made the leap from a boxy, go-anywhere SUV to sharp looking crossover with some Jeep DNA still there. But I wasn’t as impressed with the nine-speed automatic as it shuddered through the first three gears and wouldn’t go into ninth. At the time, I put the Cherokee on the wait and see list. A year has passed and another Cherokee has come in for a review.

     

    This particular Cherokee is the top of the line Trailhawk and it features a number of changes to make it a ‘Trail-Rated’ model by Jeep. Outside are a set of tow hooks on the front and rear bumper to pull out the vehicle if it gets stuck. A set seventeen-inch aluminum wheels come wrapped in meaty all-terrain tires to get you through whatever muck you decide to go through. Done up in a sharp red, the Cherokee Trailhawk makes no apologies of what its intended purpose is - going off-road.

     

    Under the skin, the Cherokee Trailhawk comes with Jeep Active Drive II. This four-wheel drive system is quite advanced as it offers a low-range setting for rock crawling and a rear lock to improve traction. Other changes for the Trailhawk include an off-road suspension with a one-inch lift, skid plates, and a 56:1 crawl ratio. We did some light off-roading on a dirt trail and found the Trailhawk to very capable as the four-wheel drive kept power flowing to us moving. Also, the suspension provided a very comfortable ride over the trail.

     

    Power for the Trailhawk comes from the optional 3.2L V6 with 271 horsepower and 239 pound-feet. This engine feels plenty powerful for any situation that it is thrown at it. It also very refined during acceleration and at cruise. One part of the engine we aren’t keen on is the stop-start system. We found it be somewhat annoying as the engine wouldn’t always shut off, despite our foot planted firmly on the brake pedal. We mostly left it off for the majority of the week. As for the nine-speed automatic, it has been cleaned up for the most part. Gone is the shuddering we experienced in our first Cherokee, replaced by smooth and crisp shifts. Still, the transmission was very hesitant to go into ninth gear. We drove about 50 miles on the freeway at a 70 MPH cruise to see if it would go into ninth and no luck. At least, the ride is smooth and refined, even with the off-road tires.

     

    The big problem for the Cherokee Trailhawk is the price. The base model will set you back $30,395. Our test Trailhawk with a few options such as the V6, navigation, and a couple of other packages to reach an as-tested price of $36,869. That is a lot of money for a small crossover. But considering the number of changes to make the Trailhawk a very capable model, we think that for some folks who want the capability of something like a Wrangler, but with a bit more comfort should give this model a look. Everyone else should stick with the Latitude or Altitude models.

     

    2016 Mazda CX-5 Touring
    2.5L Skyactiv-G Four-Cylinder (184 Horsepower, 185 Pound-Feet of Torque)
    Six-Speed Automatic
    Base/As-Tested: $26,465/$28,835

     

    Cheers: Improved Dash Makes Huge Difference, New Infotainment System, Performance and Fuel Economy, Excellent Handling
    Jeers: Road and Wind Noise are still in abundance

     

    Notes: It seems every time we get into the CX-5, Mazda has done some sort of change to it. The last time we drove a CX-5, it came with the new 2.5L version of the Skyactiv-G four-cylinder. The 2016 model fixes two of the biggest complaints we had in previous CX-5’s; the plain dashboard and poor infotainment system.

     

    We’ll start with the dash. First seen in the 2016 Mazda6, the dashboard looks more premium thanks to improved materials and new shapes. The new dash also brings in Mazda Connect, the latest infotainment system. This system is a huge improvement over the old system in terms of overall performance and usability. We didn’t have the issue of the navigation system showing you traveling on a different than the one you were on like we did in the 6.

     

    The CX-5 is still a joy to drive thanks to the 2.5L Skyactiv-G four-cylinder providing more than enough power for any situation and the chassis that provides superb handling in the corners. One issue we hope Mazda addresses in the future is noise isolation. There is still an abundance of wind and road noise entering the cabin.

     

    The 2016 Mazda CX-5 shows the continual improvement that the Japanese automaker has been doing is making it a better vehicle.

     

    2015 Toyota Avalon XLE Touring
    3.5L DOHC 24-Valve Dual VVT-i V6 (268 Horsepower, 248 Pound-Feet of Torque)
    Six-Speed Automatic
    Base/As-Tested: $36,080/$37,130

     

    Cheers: Stylish Look, Powerful V6, Upscale Interior, Excellent Fuel Economy
    Jeers: Sporty ride may turn off some buyers

     

    Notes: I came away very impressed when I drove the Avalon Hybrid a couple years ago. The combination of sharp styling, sporty ride, and amazing fuel economy made me pick this as one of my favorite vehicles of that year. But would the regular Avalon receive the same praise? Mostly.

     

    The Avalon is still one the sharpest looking full-size sedans with a low-slung front end, narrow grille, and coupe-like roofline. The interior is much the same as the hybrid with loads of space for both front and rear seat passengers, comfortable leather seats, and a impressive design with quality materials used throughout. Unlike the hybrid, our XLE Touring came with the smaller seven-inch Entune infotainment system. It still is easy to use and quick to respond whenever you touch the screen or one of the capacitive touch buttons.

     

    Power comes from a 3.5L V6 which is used in a number of other Toyota and Lexus products. Horsepower is rated at 268 and torque is rated at 248 pound-feet. The engine is quite a peach as speed comes on at a very quick rate. But the engine is also quiet during acceleration, making a perfect highway companion. In the corners, the Avalon displays a level of athleticism not seen in other full-size sedans. Body roll is kept in check and the steering provides decent weight. This does mean the Avalon isn’t as comfortable as competitors as some bumps do make their way into the interior.

     

    Disclaimer: Acura, Jeep, Mazda, and Toyota Provided the vehicles, Insurance, and One Tank of Gas

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    Nice little write up. Good to hear a little first-hand experience with a few vehicle I could see myself in or considering in the next couple of years( ILX, Cherokee, CX-5). 

     

    I know you said "The CX-5 is still a joy to drive thanks to the 2.5L Skyactiv-G four-cylinder providing more than enough power for any situation" but is the 184hp/185tq really enough..? I mean I know day to day it is plenty but would it keep an enthusiast "entertained" while not owning something sportier? That's why I went with the 2.0T in my Escape. At the time I couldn't find a CX-5 with a 2.5 in my price range and I knew the original 2.0 making something like 155hp would not cut it so I never drove a CX-5. 

     

    I'm also really curious about the 9spd in the Cherokee. Is it really that difficult to get it into 9th? How fast do you have to go before it'll shift into 9th? Also, what are your experiences with the 3.2 and 9spd for fuel economy? It seems like it has potential to be be a very good combination but if it isn't using all of its gears...

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    Nice little write up. Good to hear a little first-hand experience with a few vehicle I could see myself in or considering in the next couple of years( ILX, Cherokee, CX-5). 

     

    I know you said "The CX-5 is still a joy to drive thanks to the 2.5L Skyactiv-G four-cylinder providing more than enough power for any situation" but is the 184hp/185tq really enough..? I mean I know day to day it is plenty but would it keep an enthusiast "entertained" while not owning something sportier? That's why I went with the 2.0T in my Escape. At the time I couldn't find a CX-5 with a 2.5 in my price range and I knew the original 2.0 making something like 155hp would not cut it so I never drove a CX-5. 

     

    I'm also really curious about the 9spd in the Cherokee. Is it really that difficult to get it into 9th? How fast do you have to go before it'll shift into 9th? Also, what are your experiences with the 3.2 and 9spd for fuel economy? It seems like it has potential to be be a very good combination but if it isn't using all of its gears...

     

    CX-5: It would, but compared to your Escape it would be a different type of fun. If you want to work the engine somewhat (reving it up a little bit to enjoy the power) then a CX-5 is perfect. But if you want some instantaneous power, then the Escape with the 2.0T is the better option.

    Cherokee: As I understand it, you have to be a steady 70 to 75 MPH on a flat road for ninth gear to engage. I have done it in this and the ProMaster City, and only got either one to eighth. Fuel economy, I think I got an average of 23 MPG.

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    Nice little write up. Good to hear a little first-hand experience with a few vehicle I could see myself in or considering in the next couple of years( ILX, Cherokee, CX-5). 

     

    I know you said "The CX-5 is still a joy to drive thanks to the 2.5L Skyactiv-G four-cylinder providing more than enough power for any situation" but is the 184hp/185tq really enough..? I mean I know day to day it is plenty but would it keep an enthusiast "entertained" while not owning something sportier? That's why I went with the 2.0T in my Escape. At the time I couldn't find a CX-5 with a 2.5 in my price range and I knew the original 2.0 making something like 155hp would not cut it so I never drove a CX-5. 

     

    I'm also really curious about the 9spd in the Cherokee. Is it really that difficult to get it into 9th? How fast do you have to go before it'll shift into 9th? Also, what are your experiences with the 3.2 and 9spd for fuel economy? It seems like it has potential to be be a very good combination but if it isn't using all of its gears...

     

    CX-5: It would, but compared to your Escape it would be a different type of fun. If you want to work the engine somewhat (reving it up a little bit to enjoy the power) then a CX-5 is perfect. But if you want some instantaneous power, then the Escape with the 2.0T is the better option.

    Cherokee: As I understand it, you have to be a steady 70 to 75 MPH on a flat road for ninth gear to engage. I have done it in this and the ProMaster City, and only got either one to eighth. Fuel economy, I think I got an average of 23 MPG.

     

    Does the Cherokee have an instant mpg readout? Just cuious what it was reading when cruising at 70-75mph. 

     

    Also, how was the mileage in the CX-5? You never said if it was FWD or AWD, I'm assuming FWD..? I don't mind working the engine for some fun-time but if its like a passing situation the 2.0 really impresses me when I put my foot on the floor and I'm "afraid" the 2.5 in the Mazda just wouldn't really be enough. I'd REALLY like to drive one, along with the new Cherokee. 

     

    Yeah, the trans thing seems odd to me. Why put in a transmission that doesn't even use all of its gears? I guess I could see for states with speed limits of 80mph, as long as it actually shifts into 9th then. Maley, Do you know at what speed the trans will finally shift into 9th? I'd definitely have to fiddle around with that because it would drive me nuts. Could you manually put it in 9th going 70/75mph? 

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    Mazda just doesn't seek to make their vehicles tomb like, other Japanese manuf.'s also lack noise reduction (Honda that is you).  It would be nice to see Mazda drop that turbo 2.5 into the CX-5 as a high level option.

     

    As nice as the CX-5 is, the available 2.0 in the Escape to me makes all the difference in the world.  And the Escape prices right now are insane with the rebates.  You can get a 2.0 as a great deal and the real world mpg vs. the smaller Ecoboost is not much of a difference.

     

    Ford will be fixing some of the cabin issues in 2017 with the Escape and a new again 2.0 and that at that point I wonder if the CX-5 has any remaining advantages over an Escape.

     

    I can see where Jeep fans would like the Cherokee but i can't get on board with it, I do give it credit for being a solid offering.  The 9th gear in the tranny has to be vaporware!!!!

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    • By William Maley
      Do you need a V8 engine in your flagship luxury sedan? That's a question I posed myself when a Genesis G90 equipped with a 5.0L V8 engine was dropped off for a week. The standard G90 with the twin-turbo V6 offers an impressive amount of performance and refinement. But the V8 offers much more power, along with some extra goodies you cannot get with the V6. 
      Since our last visit with the G90, Genesis has given a bit of a facelift. The front end prominently features a new diamond-shape. I found myself growing to like it, even if I thought it was a tad too large. But I can see this becoming a point of contention. Other changes include new wheels and a restyled rear end that makes the G90 look a bit cleaner. No changes of note for the interior. It still is very luxurious to sit in and the controls are logically laid out. The only item I'm sad not to see is the new 12.3-inch digital cluster that is found in the all-new G80 and GV80. Opting for the Ultimate means back seat passengers get their own screens mounted behind the front seats. This allows you to tap into the G90's infotainment system to play audio, check various information, and look at the navigation system. Ultimate models come with the larger 5.0L V8 producing 420 horsepower and 460 pound-feet of torque. This is paired with an eight-speed automatic and rear-wheel drive. All-wheel drive is available as an option. The V8 is a bit of a tough sell when compared to the twin-turbo 3.3L V6 as it slower off the line and not as flexible whenever you need to accelerate quickly. Both engines also are similar in terms of refinement, offer a muted engine note. The only place I found the V8 to be slightly better than the V6 was in my average fuel economy. The V8 returned 24.7 mpg, while the V6 only got 20.3 mpg. A combination of the V8 G90 being rear-wheel and not all-wheel, along with more miles being done on the highway likely contributed to the better fuel economy figures. Ride quality is still on the hallmarks of the G90. With the adaptive suspension in either SMART or Comfort, the G90 glides along any road surface with nary a bump or pothole coming inside.  Around bends, the G90 doesn't feel at home with a fair amount of body roll. There is a Sport model to help reduce this, along with adding more weight to the steering. For the as-tested price of $76,695, you are getting quite a lot of equipment. There are LED headlights, Nappa leather upholstery, three-zone climate control, 17-speaker Lexicon audio system, power sunshades, adaptive cruise control, blind spot monitoring, memory settings for seats, and much more. The only way I could recommend the G90 Ultimate is either if you're operating a livery service or just want a V8 engine no matter what. Otherwise, you'll be happy with the G90 Premium and its twin-turbo V6. That said, the current G90 is starting to show its age, especially when compared to some of the new Genesis models such as the G80 and GV80. A new model is coming down the pipeline and if the recent models are any indication, the G90 has a real shot of becoming one of the best luxury sedans. Disclaimer: Genesis Provided the G90, Insurance, and One Tank of Gas
      Year: 2020
      Make: Genesis
      Model: G90
      Trim: 5.0 Ultimate
      Engine: 5.0L GDI V8
      Driveline: Eight-Speed Automatic, Rear-Wheel Drive
      Horsepower @ RPM: 420 @ 6,000
      Torque @ RPM: 383 @ 5,000
      Fuel Economy: City/Highway/Combined - 16/24/19
      Curb Weight: 4,817 lbs
      Location of Manufacture: Ulsan, Korea
      Base Price: $75,700
      As Tested Price: $76,695 (Includes $995.00 Destination Charge)
      Options: N/A

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    • By William Maley
      Considering the number of Lexus RC coupes I have driven over the years, there has been a significant hole - the V8 RC F. Whenever I have asked for one, the vehicle either wasn't in the press fleet or someone else was driving it during the dates I had available. But I was able to finally get my hands on one for a week in early fall. It was good timing as I was feeling the effects of being home for the past six months due to COVID-19. Maybe this coupe could give me a bit of joy.
      The RC F is not a shrinking violet. From its bright yellow paint, blacked-out 20-inch wheels, and optional carbon fiber package that includes a retractable rear spoiler, this coupe is very brash and proud of it. I'll admit that I was worried about scraping or cracking the carbon fiber front splitter if I took a steep entrance ramp or bump a bit too aggressively. It looks cool on the car, but the existential dread of an expensive repair bill does sour the appeal.  Not much changes on the inside for the RC F except for carbon fiber trim and a set of racing-style seats. Usually, I have a lot of trepidation on this type of seat because I don't fully fit in due to my slightly wide shoulders. But the seats conformed to my body within a day or so and I found them to offer the balance of support during hard-driving, and comfort for day-to-day - something I find to be hit and miss on seats from other automakers. Lexus Enform is still a frustrating infotainment system to use on daily basis. With a touchy control pad, it is easy to find yourself changing the song or end up in a different section of the system. This means you need to pay close attention to any change being made, which becomes a distraction hazard. Apple CarPlay is standard and does make using the system a bit more bearable. But I do wish Lexus would roll out their touchscreen system which makes it much more intuitive. Though, that likely will not come until a redesign, possibly in the next year or two. The main event for the RC F is under the hood. A 5.0L V8 engine with 467 horsepower and 389 pound-feet of torque - figures that slightly pale when compared to the BMW M4 or Mercedes-AMG C63. This is paired with an eight-speed automatic which routes the power to the rear wheels. The initial acceleration is a slight disappointment as the throttle response feels a bit sleepy. I'm not sure if this was due to improve fuel economy or throttle feel higher in the rev band. Thankfully, this sleepiness goes away as the car climbs up in speed and the V8 reveals its party trick. The noise that comes out of this engine sounds like a muscle car and you find yourself stepping the accelerator to enjoy it. Not much to say about the eight-speed automatic. It goes about its business smoothly and quickly. Fuel economy was surprising in the least, as I got an average of 18 mpg in mostly city and suburb driving. A set of adaptive dampers comes standard for the RC-F and gives it a split personality. Turn the drive mode knob to Sport+ and the dampers tighten up to make the coupe feel more agile than its weight of 4,017 pounds would suggest. Also helping in the handling are a set of Michelin Pilot Sport 4S summer tires, providing tenacious grip. But switch the drive mode into normal and RC F becomes a very comfortable and refined grand tourer. Ride quality is very good with only a few bumps making their way inside. A minimal amount of road and wind noise is present. One area where the RC F holds a distinct advantage over the completion is the base price of $65,925 - undercutting most by a few grand. The danger is going through the option list and deciding to go crazy, which explains the as-tested price of $89,654. You can chop off over $11,000 by skipping the Performance package which brings all of the carbon fiber bits. The RC F lacks the outright performance as those from Germany. But I'm willing to overlook it because sometimes you want a car that just shouts to the world and the RC F does that very well. During my week, I found myself reveling in the engine and the grand touring characteristics of the suspension. It brought me the joy which sometimes is all you need a car to do. Disclaimer: Lexus Provided the RC F, Insurance, and One Tank of Gas
      Year: 2020
      Make: Lexus
      Model: RC F
      Trim: -
      Engine: 5.0L DOHC 32-Valve V8
      Driveline: Eight-Speed Automatic, Rear-Wheel Drive
      Horsepower @ RPM: 467 @ 7,100
      Torque @ RPM: 389 @ 4,800 - 5,600
      Fuel Economy: City/Highway/Combined - 16/24/19
      Curb Weight: 3,958 lbs
      Location of Manufacture: Tahara, Aichi, Japan
      Base Price: $64,900
      As Tested Price: $89,654 (Includes $1,025.00 Destination Charge)
      Options:
      Performance Package - $11,400.00
      Premium Package - $5,350.00
      Navigation System w/Mark Levinson Audio - $2,725.00
      Torque Vectoring Differential - $1,250.00
      Premium Triple Beam LED Headlamps - $1,160.00
      Flare Yellow Premium Paint - $595.00
      Intuitive Parking Assist - $500.00
      Illuminated Door Sills - $449.00
      Orange Metallic Brembo Brake Calipers - $300.00

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  • Posts

    • And READ my post.   *On one hand you say and SUV like your friends Infiniti is perfectly fine for hauling stuff because all you need is a tarp and a vacuum.   *On the other hand you say that this cannot be done with a Suburban for a different set of reasons.   If you don't the issue I have here, then perhaps we need to move on from this because we are not going to see eye to eye here if you don't that issue.   Again, vehicles like the Hyundai Santa Cruz do have multiple uses for multiple types of people. You just happen to not be one of them but you were never interested to begin with. I, on the other hand, am very interested in it and that bed length is the LEAST of my worries.
    • For shit like that I'd hire a landscaper, who would haul such content in a dump truck or trailer. 
    • You going to hand-shovel a ton & a half of wet stone into the back of a Suburban, trying to tarp the carpeted bottom & plastic sides of the interior to keep it from getting torn apart? Really? Re-read my post- people don't put LOOSE material of any considerable volume in a vehicle like a Suburban. Is it physically possible? Sure - but does it happen? But a lawn mower or a potted shrub or a few bags of mulch- a roofed SUV could handle as well as a 4-ft bed trucklette. The overlap in cargo capability of a 4-ft bed and a mid-size SUV is a LOT more than between a Suburban and a full-size pickup.  
    • So while a tarp for your friends Infinite was okay, is not okay for a Suburban? That makes zero sense and that is the double talk I was talking about here. What you just said about the Suburban can be applied to the Infiniti and it actually makes a case for the Hyundai in the process. Again, being hung up on the bed size caused this. 
    • Everything else (and a buttload of excuses by you) aside, I do find it amusing how you think bags of mulch don’t gets holes in them and leak everywhere like they tend to do. Quite frankly you have tried to play it both ways by touting Full size trucks on one hand while trying to say that SUVs are better suited for light work (they are not in this case) than the Santa Cruz while ignoring the fact that the SUV argument applies to full size trucks. This all started because of your “problem” with bed size which, quite honestly, seems to be your problem and your problem alone here but not everyone sees it as a problem and the positives have been pointed out in spades.     And I live in NC and have ZERO use for a snow blower. Thanks for playing though Balth but please don’t try and act like gas spillage inside a vehicle isn’t a issue (it is). Whether someone goes electric or not is 100% irrelevant and you are deflecting with that statement. And again, all of those efforts your Infiniti boy makes to accommodate loads in his SUV could by 99.9% mitigated and simplified by just having a small bed with which to carry those things without the follow up cleaning and tarp shaking lol. Seriously, stop trying to equate your needs with others here (or dropping your “friend” as an example that actually supported the need for something like the Hyundai).
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