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Variance

Honda Unveils Next-Gen Clean Diesel

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Variance    0

Honda Unveils Next-Gen Clean Diesel

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TOCHIGI, Japan 09/25/2006 -- Honda Motor Co., Ltd., today announced it has developed a next-generation diesel engine that reduces exhaust gas emissions to a level equal to a gasoline engine. Honda's next-generation diesel engine employs a revolutionary NOx catalytic converter that enables a great reduction in NOx emissions sufficient to meet stringent U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Tier II Bin 5 emissions requirements (based on Honda's internal calculations). This catalytic converter features the world's first innovative system using the reductive reaction of ammonia generated within the catalytic converter to "detoxify" nitrogen oxide (NOx) by turning it into harmless nitrogen (N2).

The new catalytic converter utilizes a two-layer structure: one layer adsorbs NOx from the exhaust gas and converts a portion of it into ammonia, while the other layer adsorbs the resulting ammonia, and uses it later in a reaction that converts the remaining NOx in the exhaust into nitrogen (N2). Ammonia is a highly effective reagent for reducing NOx into N2 in an oxygen-rich, lean-burn atmosphere. This ability to generate and store ammonia within the catalytic converter has enabled Honda to create a compact, lightweight NOx reduction system for diesel engines. The system also features enhanced NOx reduction performance at 200-300oC, the main temperature range of diesel engines.

Honda designed the catalytic converter for use with its 2.2 i-CTDi diesel engine, which has earned widespread praise for quiet, clean operation and dynamic performance since its introduction in 2003 on the European Accord model.

By further advancing combustion control, the 2.2 i-CTDi delivers cleaner exhaust to the NOx catalytic converter. Honda achieved this by optimizing the combustion chamber configuration, reducing fuel injection time with a 2,000-bar common rail injection system and boosting the efficiency of the EGR (exhaust gas recirculation) system. Thanks to these improvements, Honda has reduced the amount of NOx and soot normally found in engine exhaust, while increasing power output.

Along with developing superior technology for cleaning exhaust gas, Honda plans to address other technical challenges in developing clean diesel engines, such as handling diesel fuels with different cetane numbers and meeting U.S. On-Board Diagnostic System requirements. Honda plans to introduce its next-generation diesel engine in the U.S. within three years.

Gasoline engines presently employ three-way catalytic converters that offer NOx reduction rates as high as 99 percent, but this performance is possible only at the stoichiometric air-fuel ratio. In the oxygen-rich environment of a lean-burn diesel engine, three-way catalytic converters only reduce NOx levels by approximately 10 percent. Honda's new catalytic converter efficiently reduces NOx in a lean-burn atmosphere, enabling diesel engines to rival gasoline engines in cleanliness. The compact system is also easy to install in passenger vehicles.

Source: Honda Motor Company

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Drew Dowdell    5,159

If it is as clean as gasoline, there will no longer be a compelling reason to choose gasoline cars...

Interesting. I applaud Honda.

197518[/snapback]

especially with:

its 2.2 i-CTDi diesel engine, which has earned widespread praise for quiet, clean operation and dynamic performance since its introduction in 2003 on the European Accord model.

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thegriffon    5

The tricky bit will be the OBD II requirements and knowing when to switch burn modes to catalyse the NOx to NH3 and then to N2 and H20, and balancing that with the regular DPF burn modes. If they can demonstrate it works it will be at a slight advantage over urea-based solutions which depend on additives such as AdBlue being refilled at service.

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pow    106

If it is as clean as gasoline, there will no longer be a compelling reason to choose gasoline cars...

Interesting. I applaud Honda.

197518[/snapback]

Astronomical price?

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Drew Dowdell    5,159

Astronomical price?

197565[/snapback]

It's a better catalytic converter for an existing engine to meet CA emissions <which I'm sure will be changes so as to not allow this engine>.

How much more can it really cost?

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pow    106

It's a better catalytic converter for an existing engine to meet CA emissions <which I'm sure will be changes so as to not allow this engine>.

How much more can it really cost?

197572[/snapback]

Diesels are already more expensive to build than comparable gas engines, so like hybrids, it's questionable whether or not there will be a payback.

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big blue    1

Good going Honda. One reason why I prefer their products is they're an engineering driven company vs the Toyota domination machine. Anything that helps with a cleaner Earth is a win. Now where's my personal Honda ASIMO robot to get my drinks while I'm vegetating on my couch? :)

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regfootball    250

Diesels are already more expensive to build than comparable gas engines, so like hybrids, it's questionable whether or not there will be a payback.

197580[/snapback]

40% higher mpg helps.

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Drew Dowdell    5,159

Diesels are already more expensive to build than comparable gas engines, so like hybrids, it's questionable whether or not there will be a payback.

197580[/snapback]

The Jetta 2.5 sedan <not the value edition> and the Jetta TDI have a nearly identical feature list. The TDI is $2100 more than the gasser.

Mileage ratings for the gasser are 22/30

Mileage ratings for the diesel are 36/41

Unlike the hybrids, the Jetta TDIs are known for not only meeting their EPA ratings, but blowing right by them.

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toyoguy    0

very nice, Honda will finally bring diesels to the US.

Something the Germans have failed at, ironic considering they spared zero expense in attempting to convince Americans of diesel superiority compared to gasoline engines.

Maybe MB should stick a bigger turbo on their bluetecs

8)

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