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Chris_Doane

Spied: Next Gen Military Humvee

15 posts in this topic

"It's also rumoured the powertrain will include a hybrid electric to improve fuel economy, as well. "

A high-price military contract vehicle like this would benefit greatly from a hybrid powertrain, especially on the field, where gas stations aren't exactly a commodity.

And... 22.5" ground clearance. Damn. Are they gonna attach a step -- or at least a grab bar -- so that our military men can actually get in?

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LED Headlights, wonder if they will make production. Uses less power and no worry about vibration causing a faulty headlight as with halogen.

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"It's also rumoured the powertrain will include a hybrid electric to improve fuel economy, as well. "

A high-price military contract vehicle like this would benefit greatly from a hybrid powertrain, especially on the field, where gas stations aren't exactly a commodity.

And... 22.5" ground clearance. Damn. Are they gonna attach a step -- or at least a grab bar -- so that our military men can actually get in?

The last thing I'm thinking about on the field of battle is gas milage.

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The last thing I'm thinking about on the field of battle is gas milage.

yea... the trucks we use... have a 300 gallon tank with 450 mile range... so... if u can imagine we dont think too much about fuel ecconomy...

we always drive a fuel tanker anywhere we go... and the humvees dont drink too much...

i dont think they'll be putting in a hybrid system... they want these vehicles to opperate without using electricity... in case of an EMP shockwave or something they dont want to become immobilzed... thats one reason the army uses diesel in almost everything...

i know the new humvee is supposed to achieve 90 ton miles per gallon... and i'm not sure what the difference between 90 ton mpg and 90 mpg is... cause i would think a vehicle with such capablity wouldnt be able to achieve 90 mpg... ahh... found it out... multiply the vehicles weight in tons times the fuel ecconomy... so that means this new generation ought to be getting aprox 30 mpg...

i dont know if these new humvees incorperate the new design of the underbody... but the current humvee doesnt have an axel between the wheels... it goes into the chassis... kinda weird too look at... most vehicles you look under and you'll see the axel, the differential... but by just glancing... all that stuff is tucked under the actual vehicle...

but one design that was supposed to give it a more strength to bombs is a 'V' shape to the underbody... allowing the explotion to goto one side or the other instead of into the cab... but i dont know if this design was implemented on this vehicle...

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i dont think they'll be putting in a hybrid system... they want these vehicles to opperate without using electricity

Incorrect on both points.

They want to vehicles to generate MORE electricity than they do now for battlefield systems.

Sure the guys driving them don't think about fuel economy. The guys at the DoD paying for the fuel DO think about it. They are also want to use less of the very vunerable fuel convoys.

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Incorrect on both points.

They want to vehicles to generate MORE electricity than they do now for battlefield systems.

Sure the guys driving them don't think about fuel economy. The guys at the DoD paying for the fuel DO think about it. They are also want to use less of the very vunerable fuel convoys.

Your right

Army requests tactical vehicle with more power

Programmers want electricity, bigger payload

By Kris Osborn - Staff writer

Posted : Wednesday Jun 13, 2007 12:43:27 EDT

Army programmers have changed the requirements for the next-generation Humvee, the Joint Light Tactical Vehicle, now asking it to haul a heavier payload, drive with two flat tires, and carry embedded diagnostics and an electrical generator.

The upgraded requirements span survivability, communications, deployability and more, according to the Army TACOM Life Cycle Management Command, the lead on the joint-service effort to buy as many as 160,000 vehicles to replace the Humvee.

The new requirements were posted in early June on the command’s Web site, just ahead of the Army’s request for proposals, which is slated to be released in coming weeks, Army officials said.

At least five JLTV variants are planned: the Combat Tactical Vehicle, the Utility Vehicle, the Command and Control On-the-Move Vehicle, the Long Range Surveillance Vehicle, and the heavier, 23,000-pound Ground Maneuver Vehicle.

The payload requirements have gone up for most of the Army variants, including the utility vehicle, up 200 pounds to 5,500; the command vehicle, up 880 pounds to 5,100; and the ground maneuver vehicle, up 400 pounds to 6,700.

Some of the Marine versions are not required to carry so much; the desired payload for the Marine combat vehicle is 4,326 pounds; the command variant, 4,000 pounds.

Other new requirements include:

• Making 30 kilowatts of electricity. “The JLTV shall be capable of generating sustained power (independent of hotel loads and exportable power) with the engine running and idle and while the vehicle is moving,” the Web site says.

• Towing a trailer with ammunition and supplies. “Each JLTV shall be provided with a companion trailer that carries the same payload as its prime mover over the same speeds and mission profile. All reliability characteristics of the prime mover shall apply to the trailer,” the Web site says.

• Carrying more ammo: two cans of M-16, one can of M203, six cans of Mk-19, M2 and M60/M240-6, and four cans of M249 ammo.

The last two requirements are also part of the effort to increase fuel efficiency to 90 ton-miles per gallon at maximum gross vehicle weight.

The new requirements also emphasize survivability. They call for jam-resistant doors so that soldiers and Marines can escape after their vehicles take damage, for an automatic fire-extinguishing system and for extra spall liner to “minimize secondary perforation effects within the vehicle.” Spall is the fragments and pieces that result from hostile fire.

Also added is the requirement that the JLTV come with the A-kit armor and an option to add a B-kit that includes a gunner’s protective shield. Both kits are options on today’s Humvees. The A-kit consists of extra armor plates bolted on to the sides of the vehicle, while the B-kit is a heavier version designed to thwart stronger threats.

The JLTV must be able to run on two flat tires and keep going after a small-arms attack.

The JLTV family of vehicles shall be capable of traveling “one terrain feature” with a single small-arms perforation “in the fuel tank, engine oil reservoir, or cooling system which causes a fluid leak,” the Web site said.

All variants must use common parts, trailers, and communications gear, and must be threaded with diagnostic devices that help find and fix problems.

“The vehicle embedded diagnostic/health monitoring system will display failures/alert the operator and maintainer to enable rapid repair of electronic and electronically monitored faults and failures. Electronic monitoring will cover the following systems (not an all-inclusive list): fuel, air intake, engine, cooling, transmission, energy storage, power generation and vehicle speed,” the Web site said.

As for deployability, the JLTV requirements have previously specified that the vehicle be able to ride aboard a C-130, C-17 or C-5, or be carried by a CH-53, CH-47 or MH-47 helicopter. The new requirements say the JLTV must be able to perform a low-velocity airdrop from a C-130, C-17 or C-5 aircraft. A low-velocity airdrop, would have the vehicle dropping out of the plane without the plane landing.

The Navy’s Office of Naval Research, which has been working on JLTV technology since 2005, has ordered modeling and simulation aid from AM General, BAE Systems, Cadillac Gage, General Dynamics Land Systems and Oshkosh.

Oshkosh has built two demonstrator vehicles with on-board electric power. The Heavy Expanded Mobility Tactical Truck (HEMTT A3) is a hybrid-electric truck able to export 200 kilowatts of electric power made by Oshkosh for the Army. Oshkosh also delivered a Medium Tactical Vehicle Replacement with an on-board generator for the Marine Corps.

The requirement for on-board power “aids us because we have that experience,” said David Hare, marketing manager with Oshkosh. “We have done it inherent to a vehicle with the HEMMT A3, and with the MTVR we built it on with a kit.”

The vehicles we use are the Hemtt.. we use a couple of humvees but thats just cause our Hemtts only hold 2 people...

Edited by Newbiewar
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Looks a bit awkward, form follows function I guess.

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I hope for our solder's sake that they have more anti-roadside bomb platting.

thats what i was talking about... but realistically... the only way to improve plating is to reduce ground clearance...

some of those channeled explotions can penatrate 9-13 inches of steel...

but apparently in 2005 or so the marines noticed if you have a flat underbody... its much more easily penatrated then if its a slanted underbody, like the V shape... would allow the explotion to take the path of least resistance instead of be forced to go up into the cabin... they brought it to the attention of the department of defense... but still has not to be acted on...

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