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Intrepidation

Restore Engine Restorer

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This is what it claims to do:

During normal engine operation, the piston rings slowly wear into the surface of the cylinder wall, creating tiny imperfections. These gouges or scratches then create a channel for pressurized combustion gasses to slip past the rings down into the crankcase. This does three things, first the available compression is lessened as the gasses pass downward into the crankcase. Two, this "blowby" contaminates the engine's lubricating oil with combustion gases containing acidic compounds. And three, crankcase lubricating oil is drawn upward through the same scratch channels into the combustion chamber to be burnt. This is where your oil goes in most cases if an engine is burning it (the exception would be a worn valve guide and seal).

Restore Engine Restorer claims to fill these scratches and improves the seal between the piston rings and the cylinder walls. This means higher compression and a more balanced compression across all cylinders. Since power output and engine efficiently are tied to engine compression, an increase here would naturally raise power output and increase engine efficiency thus raising fuel mileage while lowering oil consumption. The company claims that independent road tests prove "Engine Restorer" brings back power to near original levels.

I was thinking of trying it, but I wanted to know if any of you have tried it or know if it's any good or not. I've seen mixed reviews...most seem postive but a few negatives...so is it any good or just a load of crap?

Edited by Dodgefan
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It's crap- don't waste your money.

I've seen it end two cars life already...it doesn't really do anything but clog stuff up...

If you have to use something, you'd be better off with high-milage oil or Marvel Mystery Oil......

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kinda like what everyone above has said. Really the only true way to fix a worn out engine is to do one of two things, rebuild, or replace. Sure, that'll slow it down, but by the time and money you've spent in slowing a leak down, you could have already started to either save up for a completely new engine (or at least new to you), or started buying parts to rebuild it. Sorry, from a parts guy's perspective, it isn't a "magic cure", the only real way to fix one is to well, FIX IT. Again, like said above you can use it, but its like using a thicker oil, and if you're using 20W50 anyway, then it'll just make it a little thicker, which will help seal up minor imperfections between the piston rings and cylinder walls, but at the same time, you're still looking at the extra expense of buying a can of it every time you change the oil, plus any times in between when you're say running a quart or two low.

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kinda like what everyone above has said. Really the only true way to fix a worn out engine is to do one of two things, rebuild, or replace. Sure, that'll slow it down, but by the time and money you've spent in slowing a leak down, you could have already started to either save up for a completely new engine (or at least new to you), or started buying parts to rebuild it. Sorry, from a parts guy's perspective, it isn't a "magic cure", the only real way to fix one is to well, FIX IT. Again, like said above you can use it, but its like using a thicker oil, and if you're using 20W50 anyway, then it'll just make it a little thicker, which will help seal up minor imperfections between the piston rings and cylinder walls, but at the same time, you're still looking at the extra expense of buying a can of it every time you change the oil, plus any times in between when you're say running a quart or two low.

True-but wouldn't running a thicker oil up the chance that you would get a serious leak? (By the pressure of the oil)

I've seen it done on healthy engines, but the few I've seen trying to save an engine has not ended well....

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I kind of figured it was a load of crap anyway but I thought I'd ask for the hell of it. Anyway, when the time comes I'll get the best solution..a low miles 3.5L :smilewide:

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...although I have to agree with Dodgefan, the Intrepid/LHS series are nice handeling cars.

I would own a 9C1 Caprice in a second if they came with a manual. They are cool cars.

Chris

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To answer the question, if you're already running 20W50 and you add something to it to make the oil thicker would it cause a more serious leak, its possible, but the oil pump only really circulates the oil, its the rod bearings and main bearings along the crankshaft that really MAKE you're oil pressure, so if they're in tip-top shape and you're running something really thick in there, then yes, just like water, its going to take the path of least resistance, if that happens to be a seal that's on its last leg, or a gasket that's a little nicked or cracked, then be prepared for the oil to leave through those places. Like said, just fix the problem, forget slowing it down.

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If you looking for engine cleaner use GM top engine cleaner... its the best period. You can put it in your car one of two ways... either put it in the gas tank with a half tank of gas or slowly let one of the vacuum hoses suck it in.... just be sure to have some one near the gas pedal to rev the engine if needed so you don't flood the chamber. Its 12 in a case for $122 but you can buy it individually as well by the bottle.

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Thanks Batman, I might try some in the Safari...

Chris

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Thanks Batman, I might try some in the Safari...

Chris

my mechanic told me a funny story... he worked for MB for about 15 years.... so they would use MB products... however he said right next to their engine cleaner on the shelf was GM top engine cleaner.... :AH-HA_wink: as well as GM heat valve lubricant

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As a general guideline (not 100% rule), additives are junk. They are usually a "quick fix" that often just delays a problem, but then leaves you in a much worse situation. When something is broken, fix it right.

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