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William Maley

2012 Mitsubishi Outlander GT S-AWC

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William Maley    404

William Maley

Staff Writer - CheersandGears.com

August 7, 2012

Mitsubishi, a brand that was riding high in the early to mid-nineties with vehicles like the Eclipse, Galant, Montero, and Diamante has fallen into obscurity very rapidly. In the same time frame, the crossover utility vehicle has become the ubiquitous go-to car for many American shoppers. As arguably one of the mostly hotly competitive sales segments, Mitsubishi's challenge is to make a stand out vehicle for shoppers drowning in a sea of model names.

To overcome this challenge, Mitsubishi has brought not one, but two distinct crossovers; the Outlander and Outlander Sport. But, does standing out help or hurt a crossover like the Outlander or Outlander Sport. To find out, a 2012 Mitsubishi Outlander GT S-AWC was dropped off for a week long evaluation.

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William Maley is a staff writer for Cheers & Gears. He can be reached at william.maley@cheersandgears.com or you can follow him on twitter at @realmudmonster.

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dfelt    1,858

Great review, nice write up.

I have to say Jeers to the Body design as it screams mini mini van to me and then has that freak-in ugly big black mouth for a front end. The dash while looking functional just screams minimalistic and makes me wonder what else was a short cut in cheapening the car to hit a certian price point.

This is a car company that I do not see in the future just like Mazda unless it merges with some one.

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"Mitsubishi, a brand that was riding high in the early to mid-nineties with vehicles like the Eclipse, Galant, Montero, and Diamante has fallen into obscurity very rapidly"

Not rapidly enough...given the current market, I see the demise of Mitsu, Suzuki, Mazda, and a few other players.

Nice write up on a dismal vehicle.

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regfootball    248

front row is comfy, second row is flexible, buttloads of cargo space for a small crossover because the cargo floor is lower and deeper.

it's no more bland than a CRV or RAV4.

AWC system is nice.

Vehicle needs more soundproofing and perceived quality issues.

Most outlanders that sell are four bangers for low to mid twenties, the loaded v6 is not a typical representation.

The vehicle is a manageable size for many who don't want something heavy and larger.

I know two people who own one and both like it a lot.

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