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    • By William Maley
      Chris Chapman, senior chief designer at Hyundai's Design Center has an ambitious plan for the coming years. He wants each Hyundai model to have their own visual identity.
      "We're going for more of this chess-piece rather than the family look. We're using consistently shared elements … but we're going to avoid this sort of Russian-doll approach to our vehicles in the future," Chapman told reporters at the media launch of the Kona EV.
      Designers will be tasked to give each model "a look that matches its intended use and customer." Take for example the Kona crossover which has a funky look that should appeal to a younger audience than the new Santa Fe. Another example is the Kona and Kona EV that have different design touches to set them apart.
      "Both kind of have extroverted design, but they're dressed differently for different demographic purposes," Chapman said.
      Part of Chapman's motivation for this comes from his past. As Roadshow notes, he worked as a designer at BMW during the Chris Bangle era which brought forth the problem of telling the difference between the 3, 5, and 7-Series. He said BMW referred to this as "Eine Wurst, drei Grosse" -- one sausage, three sizes. While he may not say it outright, reading between the lines reveals he would like to avoid this.
      Source: Roadshow

      View full article
    • By William Maley
      Chris Chapman, senior chief designer at Hyundai's Design Center has an ambitious plan for the coming years. He wants each Hyundai model to have their own visual identity.
      "We're going for more of this chess-piece rather than the family look. We're using consistently shared elements … but we're going to avoid this sort of Russian-doll approach to our vehicles in the future," Chapman told reporters at the media launch of the Kona EV.
      Designers will be tasked to give each model "a look that matches its intended use and customer." Take for example the Kona crossover which has a funky look that should appeal to a younger audience than the new Santa Fe. Another example is the Kona and Kona EV that have different design touches to set them apart.
      "Both kind of have extroverted design, but they're dressed differently for different demographic purposes," Chapman said.
      Part of Chapman's motivation for this comes from his past. As Roadshow notes, he worked as a designer at BMW during the Chris Bangle era which brought forth the problem of telling the difference between the 3, 5, and 7-Series. He said BMW referred to this as "Eine Wurst, drei Grosse" -- one sausage, three sizes. While he may not say it outright, reading between the lines reveals he would like to avoid this.
      Source: Roadshow
    • By William Maley
      Fiat Chrysler Automobiles is none too pleased with the Indian automaker Mahindra & Mahindra Ltd as they're planning to sell an off-road vehicle that looks very much like the original Willys Jeep.
      Bloomberg obtained a complaint filed by FCA to the U.S. International Trade Commission on August 1st. The document claims that Mahindra's Roxor infringes key characteristics of Jeep's signature design - namely the “boxy body shape with flat-appearing vertical sides and rear body ending at about the same height as the hood.”
      “They are a nearly identical copy of the iconic Jeep design. In fact, the accused product was ‘modeled after the original Willys Jeep."
      The Roxor is a small, two-seat off-road vehicle. There is a lot of resemblance to original Jeep design and there is a reason for that. Beginning in 1947, Mahindra got a license to build the Willys CJ3 for the Asian market. They would do so until 2010. At this point, Mahindra introduced an updated model known as the Thar that meets India's road going passenger vehicle standards and looks like a 1990's Wrangler.
      Now the Roxor isn't being sold as road-legal vehicle. Instead, Mahindra is selling this as a side-by-side off-road utility. That means its not road legal. Which brings us to the next key part of FCA's complaint. The company is arguing that Roxor imports "threaten it with substantial injury as they are underselling Jeeps." This is due to Mahindra manufacturing the parts and creating a knock-down kit, which is then shipped to a plant in the Detroit area for final assembly. We're not sure about this partly due to the arena the Roxor competes in, but also the price. The model begins at just under $15,500. Comparable models from Polaris and Honda begin at under $10,000.
      While Mahindra has had some success in the U.S. with tractors, they haven't had the same when it comes to automobiles. Previously, the company was planning to offer a diesel pickup through a distributor. But plans were scrapped and Mahindra would find itself in a lengthy court battle. The Roxor is the next attempt at possible entry for Mahindra to enter the automotive market. They have spent almost a quarter-billion dollars for a new assembly plant where they currently employ around 300 people. Last November, the company announced a $600 investment and plans to employ as many as 670 workers by 2020.
      Source: Bloomberg

      View full article
    • By William Maley
      Fiat Chrysler Automobiles is none too pleased with the Indian automaker Mahindra & Mahindra Ltd as they're planning to sell an off-road vehicle that looks very much like the original Willys Jeep.
      Bloomberg obtained a complaint filed by FCA to the U.S. International Trade Commission on August 1st. The document claims that Mahindra's Roxor infringes key characteristics of Jeep's signature design - namely the “boxy body shape with flat-appearing vertical sides and rear body ending at about the same height as the hood.”
      “They are a nearly identical copy of the iconic Jeep design. In fact, the accused product was ‘modeled after the original Willys Jeep."
      The Roxor is a small, two-seat off-road vehicle. There is a lot of resemblance to original Jeep design and there is a reason for that. Beginning in 1947, Mahindra got a license to build the Willys CJ3 for the Asian market. They would do so until 2010. At this point, Mahindra introduced an updated model known as the Thar that meets India's road going passenger vehicle standards and looks like a 1990's Wrangler.
      Now the Roxor isn't being sold as road-legal vehicle. Instead, Mahindra is selling this as a side-by-side off-road utility. That means its not road legal. Which brings us to the next key part of FCA's complaint. The company is arguing that Roxor imports "threaten it with substantial injury as they are underselling Jeeps." This is due to Mahindra manufacturing the parts and creating a knock-down kit, which is then shipped to a plant in the Detroit area for final assembly. We're not sure about this partly due to the arena the Roxor competes in, but also the price. The model begins at just under $15,500. Comparable models from Polaris and Honda begin at under $10,000.
      While Mahindra has had some success in the U.S. with tractors, they haven't had the same when it comes to automobiles. Previously, the company was planning to offer a diesel pickup through a distributor. But plans were scrapped and Mahindra would find itself in a lengthy court battle. The Roxor is the next attempt at possible entry for Mahindra to enter the automotive market. They have spent almost a quarter-billion dollars for a new assembly plant where they currently employ around 300 people. Last November, the company announced a $600 investment and plans to employ as many as 670 workers by 2020.
      Source: Bloomberg
    • By William Maley
      We've known that Bentley is planning to do an electric vehicle, most likely using the platform underpinning the Porsche Mission E. What is still up in the air is what shape that vehicle could be? 
      “The next step for sure is an electric, unique Bentley that isn’t based on an existing car but a completely fresh and new development, with electric propulsion and obviously different proportions following the function. It gives us a great chance to establish a completely new design language for the company,” said Bentley design director Stefan Sielaff.
      “It will happen not so far in the future.”
      Auto Express believes the model in question is a four-door coupe, partly due to Sielaff's comments.

      “It should be a four or five-seater and it should also have the possibility to carry a little bit of luggage, maybe not for five people. I think we need to make sure that this family member is obviously new, and not imitating another concept we have already in the portfolio. But definitely more than two seats; that’s something I am convinced of,” said Sielaff.
      “But nevertheless I think it should be a vehicle that contains a certain coupe-style or sportivity, and also a certain elegance. I don’t think it should be something that is raised high, like an SUV.”
      This seems to line up with a rumor back in November where it was reported that Bentley was planning a four-door coupe possibly named Barnato.
      Source: Auto Express

      View full article
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