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LA Auto Show: 2017 Mitsubishi Mirage: Comments


Drew Dowdell

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Mitsubishi is updating the Mirage economy hatchback for 2017. It gets a refreshed exterior along with some interior and technology updates.

 

Likely the most important change to buyers will be the addition of Android Auto and Apple Car play in the infotainment system. With the addition of these two technologies, buyers have an inexpensive way to add features like Navigation and Apps to their car, features that are not often found in vehicles at the Mirage's low price point.

 

The exterior changes are light with an updated front end and rear bumper. The 3-cylinder engine remains the only power plant, but with a slight bump in power to 78 horsepower and 74 lb-ft of torque.

 

The suspension and brakes have been upgraded for better performance.

 

The 2017 Mirage goes on sale in the spring of 2016.

 

You can follow all of our coverage of the 2015 LA Auto Show here or follow us on Facebook, Twitter, and Google+

 

Source: Mitsubishi Media

 

 

Press Release on Page 2

 


 


THE 2017 MITSUBISHI MIRAGE:


NEW EXTERIOR DESIGN AND ADDED PERFORMANCE ENHANCEMENTS

 


· The new Mitsubishi Mirage continues to deliver outstanding fuel economy
· 2017 Mirage will feature Android Auto™ and Apple CarPlay™
· Attractive pricing and 10-year warranty distances the competition

 

CYPRESS, Calif. Nov. 18, 2015Mitsubishi Motors North America, Inc. (MMNA) today announced details for the fuel-efficient 2017 Mitsubishi Mirage featuring a new exterior design, improved performance and enhanced interior appeal. Despite all that is new for Mirage in 2017, a few things didn’t change at all—Mirage still offers impressive fuel economy, attractive pricing and industry leading new vehicle and powertrain warranties. The Mitsubishi Mirage hatchback will be available at dealers in spring 2016.

 

“Mirage has gained popularity with its affordable and practical appeal,” said Don Swearingen, executive vice president, MNNA. “Mirage owners are looking for a vehicle that does its job well and is reliable. The Mirage continues to deliver all of those attributes, and the improvements to the 2017 model year will expand the Mirage’s appeal even more.”

 

The changes for the 2017 model year are led with the new exterior design. Mirage receives a fresh new look with redesigned hood, grille, front and rear bumper, fog and headlamps, rear spoiler and wheels. The exterior styling was given purpose, with an aerodynamic design to maximize fuel-efficiency and a simple, restrained form to help reduce weight, creating a car in which form and function come together.

 

Inside, Mirage receives a design update with new seat fabrics, gauge cluster, steering wheel and shift panel. In addition, a new 300-watt Rockford-Fosgate audio system with EcoPunch is available with Smartphone Link Display Audio, Apple CarPlay and Android Auto™, the first Mitsubishi vehicle to get these popular infotainment systems in the U.S.

 

The 2017 Mirage continues to utilize a 1.2-liter 3-cylinder DOHC engine featuring the latest version of Mitsubishi Innovative Valve timing Electronic Control (MIVEC) variable valve-timing system that maximizes fuel efficiency and power output while greatly minimizing exhaust emissions. With the addition of a roller-type camshaft, Mirage increases its horsepower to 78 horsepower and 74 lb-ft torque.

 

Mirage’s handling and brakes are improved for 2017 as well. Optimizing the spring rate and damping force of the shock absorbers while adding stiffness to the front end achieve handling and stability improvements. In addition, bigger diameter brake discs (251 mm) are used in the front and the rear brake drums (203 mm) have increased 23 millimeters. The brake pad/shoe material has also been changed for even better stopping performance.

 

Every 2017 Mirage comes equipped with a wide array of safety features and technologies. These include a seven air bag Supplemental Restraint System (SRS) comprised of dual front air bags, dual front seat-mounted side-impact air bags, dual side-impact curtain air bags, and a driver’s knee air bag; 4-wheel anti-lock brakes (ABS) with Electronic Brake-force Distribution (EBD) and Brake Assist; a Tire Pressure Monitoring System (TPMS); and Active Stability Control (ASC) with Traction Control Logic (TCL). Mirage models equipped with the continuously-variable transmission-equipped (CVT) also include Hill Start Assist (HSA).

 

 

For more information on the redesigned 2017 Mirage please visit media.mitsubishicars.com and be sure to visit us on Facebook, Twitter, Google+ and YouTube.


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these sell well in the compressed areas of urbanity.  they're cheap and small.  Despite how bad the car is, Mitsu is really carving out a niche for themselves here and it keeps the lights on at their dealers.  And maybe build some future repeat biz.....  to get a 10 yr powertrain wty on a car like this is a big thing.

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      DECEMBER
      YTD
       
      2019
      2018
      2019
      2018
      Mirage
      1753
      1748
      26966
      24316
      Lancer1
      0
      0
      0
      3302
      Outlander Sport
      2496
      2563
      33644
      39153
      Outlander
      3977
      2647
      37965
      37652
      Outlander PHEV
      269
      431
      2810
      4166
      Eclipse Cross
      1420
      1597
      19661
      9485
      Total
      9915
      8986
      121046
      118074
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