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dfelt

Bosch Selling WaterBoost Injection for Turbo Engines

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G. David Felt
Staff Writer Alternative Energy - www.CheersandGears.com

 

Bosch Selling WaterBoost Injection for Turbo Engines

Bosch-WATER_INJECTION-1020x680.jpg

Seems since BMW M4 using a Bosch water injection system that works, Bosch has decided this is what the future is for all turbo engines and has come out with a solution kit to sell to all OEMs of Turbo Engines called WaterBoost.

Essentially this is added to the intake side with a water vapor injection to cool the piston, increasing density and driving longer life and more power from the engine. This technology is not new and has been around since WWII when it was used in supercharged planes to assist during hard maneuvers and intense battle fights. The early days of water injection for auto's started with the 1962 Oldsmobile Cutlass Turbo Jetfire, water injection made another appearance in the 1980's in Formula 1 cars.

Bosch states 2019 for kit availability to OEMS and aftermarket. As per the Seattle Times story, biggest challenge will be to get the OEMs to redesign their intake system to accept the waterboost injector and customers having to refill the storage bottle with Distilled water. The second issue might not be so hard at least for Diesel owners who are already used to filling up their Urea bottles to clean up their emissions. Yet will the average petro driver want to deal with refilling a water bottle on the engine and how long will the water bottle last, what happens once it is empty, will the engine still run or stop or detune? Interesting times we live in for the auto industry builders.

Big question is what is the cost? Will it be worth the 5% greater engine performance, 13% less fuel consumption and 4% less CO2 emitted per the Bosch web site?

Info Source

Bosch web site

Seattle Times web site

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