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William Maley

GMC News: Spying: Excuse Me, But Does That Sierra Have A Diesel?

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The Ram 1500 has a diesel option and recently updated Ford F-150 will be getting one in the near future. What about General Motors' full-size pickups? Some new spy photos reveal that it could be in the cards for the next-generation models.

Somehow, a spy photographer was able to get underneath a GMC Sierra mule to find what appears to be a tank for diesel exhaust fluid and a diesel particulate filter - key items you need to sell a diesel in the U.S. Of course, the question arises of what engine is under the hood. Various reports say it could range from a 3.0L V6 from Navistar to the 2.8L Duramax four-cylinder found in the Colorado/Canyon (we're a bit dubious on this one).

We're expecting to hear news on the next-generation Silverado and Sierra some next year, possibly at the Detroit auto show.

Source: Autoblog, Motor1


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Not unexpected and very understandable. I would expect it to be a V6 which could end up being an upgrade diesel option for the mid size twins then. :P

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