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    New York Auto Show: 2016 Scion iM


    • Scion Gets Some Love from Toyota Europe with the 2016 iM


    Scion used the LA Auto Show as litmus test to show off a possible new model, the iM concept. This concept was a Toyota Auris sold in Europe, but was all done up with large fenders and wheels. It seems the model has passed this test as the production model iM has been introduced the night before the start of New York Auto Show.

    The production model loses all of the concept bits such as front and rear bumpers, and forged wheels. What we're left with is a quite good looking hatchback. The front boasts a slim, honeycomb grille and narrowed headlights. Around back is a distinctive tailgate design. The interior boasts a similar dashboard layout to the Corolla and features a 7-inch Pioneer infotainment system. High quality materials are used throughout, along with a leather-wrapped steering wheel.

    Power for the iM comes from a 1.8L DOHC four-cylinder with 137 horsepower and 126 pound-feet of torque. This can be paired up to either a six-speed manual or CVT. Scion estimates fuel economy numbers of 27 City/36 Highway/31 Combined for the manual and 30 City/37 Highway/32 Combined for the CVT. As for handling, the iM gets a four-wheel independent suspension setup with the rear getting a double-wishbone layout. A set of 17-inch wheels wrapped in 225/45R17 tires finish off the vehicle.

    Scion says the iM will hit dealers with a base price starting under $20,000. No word on a release date.

    Source: Scion

    Press Release is on Page 2


    Five Doors, a Hatch and Room for Adventure: All-New 2016 Scion iM Ready to Fire Up the Fun Hatch Segment

    • Distinctively cool versatile 5-door design
    • An expected MSRP of under $20,000 for fully equipped mono-spec model • High fun factor and high fuel economy estimated at 37 MPG highway
    • Choice of 6-speed stick shift or advanced CVTi-S with 7-step shifting
    • Roomy cabin with premium amenities
    • Sophisticated chassis for sophisticated moves

    NEW YORK, March 31, 2015 – If the badge on the all-new 2016 Scion iM stood for “instant message,” the message to young buyers would be that they can now get a fun-to-drive, high-style, high-content, high-MPG rated hatchback for a whole lot less than they’d expect. The all-new Scion iM arrives in dealerships this fall, starting under $20,000. In true Scion practice, that’s for a mono-spec model equipped like an upgrade model from competitors.

    The Scion iM hatchback joins the all-new 2016 Scion iA sedan for a one-two punch in the subcompact and compact segments.

    The all-new 2016 Scion iM is the answer for young buyers looking for a sporty hatchback, but who still need to pay for things like rent, food, school loans and weekend fun with friends. Its bodylines are ripped. The cabin is roomy, refined, versatile and high-tech-equipped. The 1.8-liter DOHC Valvematic engine is eager to rev and very easy on gas. The chassis, with sophisticated double-wishbone rear suspension and standard 17-inch alloy wheels, is ready to smooth out urban bumps and tame adventurous curves. For more hands-on driving fun, a six- speed stick shift is also available.

    For safety, the 2016 Scion iM comes with eight standard airbags, including a driver’s knee airbag and a front passenger seat cushion airbag.

    Design: The Meaning of iM

    In the name, the “i” stands for individual. Intriguing. Easy on the customer’s income. For the M, think modern, multi-faceted and magnetic. The iM could be a first new car, but don’t call it “entry level.” It will easily compare to hatches that start in the same price neighborhood but then demand a higher tax bracket when you add in needed upgrade options.

    The Scion iM shows a familiar face, with a hexagon lower grille, sharp-eyed headlights and side bezels with honeycomb mesh pattern seen also on the brand’s FR-S sports car. That aerodynamic expression carries into the profile, which conveys dynamic movement from the lower front to the rear. It’s like a “swoosh line” rendered in steel.

    Detailing on the Scion iM belies the affordable pricing. The piano black grille treatment, standard sporty body aero kit, LED daytime running lights and taillights leave an unmistakable signature. Also true to the Scion way, the color selection gives the design tremendous visual pop: Blizzard Pearl, Classic Silver Metallic, Black Sand Pearl, Barcelona Red Metallic, Spring Green Metallic and Electric Storm Blue.

    One Spec: Fun

    Gas prices come down. Gas prices go back up. Young buyers like to avoid pain at the pump no matter what. The 2016 Scion iM offers a sweet spot of performance and efficiency, with Scion estimating a 37-MPG highway fuel economy rating. Then comes the fun side. The 137 hp 1.8-liter 4-cylinder engine uses Valvematic continuously variable valve timing (lift and phasing) technology to offer a broad torque curve, so the iM feels responsive in all situations.

    For driving purists, the Scion iM has a standard 6-speed stick shift that’s a slick shift, making for an engaging and active driving experience. Got hills? The Scion iM comes standard with Hill Start Assist, which helps prevent roll-back when you’re pulling away from a stop sign or traffic light on an incline.

    The optional automatic is also perfectly suited to the 1.8-liter engine. It’s an intelligent Continuously Variable Transmission that’s been sport-tuned for driving pleasure. That’s why it’s called the CVTi-S. Not all CVTs operate as responsively as the CVTi-S in the Scion iM. This one’s got both a Sport mode as well as manual shifting capability with seven stepped shift points.

    In Sport mode, the CVTi-S alters shift points and also provides a livelier feel through the electric power steering programming and accelerator responsiveness. G AI-SHIFT logic detects lateral G force during cornering and maintains engine speed by restricting unnecessary shift changes.

    Using the console shifter, the driver can make fast, sequential shifts through the transmission’s seven predefined steps, accompanied by the familiar sense of positive shift engagement. The 4.2-inch TFT multi-information display within the instrument cluster displays M mode activity, including the “gear” position, and other vehicle information.

    It’s Got the Moves

    In the Scion iM, instant gratification behind the wheel will turn to long-term love down the road. Driving enthusiasts know well the value of a high-strength body structure and a sophisticated four-wheel independent suspension. Based on the tC sports coupe platform, the 2016 Scion iM checks those boxes by using ample high-strength steel and special reinforcements in the structure. And it goes further, making the rear suspension the double-wishbone type, a design offering the added benefit of not impinging on cargo room.

    Add in standard 17-inch alloy wheels with fat 225/45R17 tires, and the Scion iM delivers a tight, taut road feel and a compliant ride quality. The Electronic Power Steering (EPS) system makes low-speed maneuvering a breeze and provides good feel and less assistance at highway speeds. It also helps boost fuel efficiency, because the system consumes power only when assist is needed.

    Premium Interior without the Premium Price

    Inside, it will be love at first seating in the standard bolstered front sport seats. They fit the body like a glove and also integrate a Whiplash Injury Lessen (WIL) structure for occupant protection.

    High quality materials abound throughout the Scion iM cabin, where the layered dashboard design combines sports car-inspired instrument panel styling with easy to reach, easy to use controls. With ideas borrowed from the luxury car realm, the Scion iM keeps noise outside with an acoustic layer windshield, foam- type insulation and floor silencer sheets.

    The Scion iM’s premium feel on the road is matched by a lengthy roster of premium amenities – all included as standard with the brand’s famous mono- spec strategy. Start with versatility, which comes from the 60/40 fold-down rear seats and standard cargo cover. A roomy glove box and console box are augmented by numerous front door pockets and storage bins throughout.

    As a Scion, the iM naturally comes with high-grade standard multi-media system. The 6-speaker Pioneer sound system will play from a variety of sources, including iPods, of course, and other devices. You control it all through an easy to use 7-inch Pioneer Display Audio unit that also includes standard HD Radio and Aha. It’s through that screen that you view the standard rear view backup camera.

    Real leather wraps the steering wheel, an unexpected detail in this price class. The sporty wheel puts fingertip switches for audio, multi-info display and hands- free phone calls via Bluetooth at your fingertips. The 4.2-inch color TFT multi- information display (Scion’s first) between the main instrument gauges provides displays for the car’s audio system and other functions.

    The Scion iM keeps the value surprises coming. All cars in this segment come with air conditioning; the Scion iM steps up a class with dual-zone automatic A/C control. And on cold mornings, the color-keyed heated power-folding exterior mirrors (yes, standard power-folding mirrors) get fog or frost cleared up in a hurry. Auto on/off headlamps are another convenience inherited from a higher segment.

    Build It Your Way

    One could buy the Scion iM, choose the color and be perfectly happy with the result. For those who see the car as a blank canvas, Scion offers a full range of dealer-installed accessories. A sampling includes:

    Navigation upgrade kit, body graphics, cargo area enhancements, interior light kit, all-weather floor mats and more. A roof rack system expands versatility. The Scion iM will also offer a line of TRD (Toyota Racing Development) performance accessories, including an air intake system, anti-roll bar, lowering springs and more.

    Scion drivers love their pets, and so does Scion. The iM will offer a range of cabin enhancements to take the stress out of carrying furry friends. Available through dealers, pet-friendly accessories include a dog harness with tether, door guards, seat pet barrier and even a grass pad, which discourages your doggie from standing on center console.

    A number of Scion dealers have inaugurated Pure Process Plus, which allows customers to research a car through Scion.com, find it at a dealership, apply for credit and secure a price, all without leaving the couch. Scion will continue working with dealers and Toyota Financial Services to fine-tune the process and plans to significantly expand its reach in 2015.

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    Unlike their Hideous other release of an auto that is clearly a creature from the deep. This is a nice looking auto that will sell and do them well to the Scion faithful and those looking for a good entry level auto.

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    It doesn't look awful and it doesn't have a tacked-on gaping grill that Toyota's been so fond of lately. That's progress.

     

    It's... fine. It's not beautiful.  It looks like a Toyota. Which makes me wonder why it's a Scion. Or why there's a Scion at all at this point.  It's not young or funky or ripe for customization with blingy wheels and a massive stereo or a fart can.

     

    Were this a new Toyota Matrix it'd be more appropriate.  Making this a Scion is the automotive equivalent of a middle-aged man wearing a baseball cap backwards to try to look young.

     

    -RBB

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    • By William Maley
      It has been a couple of years since we last checked out the Toyota 4Runner. Since that time, the crossover marketplace has grown even further and becoming the clear choice for many consumers. But there are still some who want/need the capability of an SUV like the 4Runner. Who should consider it?
      Toyota hasn’t changed the 4Runner’s exterior since we last checked it out. This isn’t a bad thing since one of the things I liked about it was the styling. The front end still looks like it is wearing a muzzle with a large surround for the grille and chunky front bumper. Other design details to take in are a set of flared out wheel arches, hood scoop, and rear tailgate with a window that can be raised or lowered. The interior follows the exterior with no real changes. Many materials are of the hard plastic variety which is ok considering the off-road character of the 4Runner. Having materials that can stand up to rough and tumble of off-road conditions isn’t a bad thing. The chunky knobs and simple layout of the dashboard are still here, making it easy to find certain controls when on the move. It would be nice if Toyota could swap the 6.1-inch touchscreen for something a little bit larger. It isn’t as easy to read at a glance and more often than not, you’ll be hitting the wrong touchscreen button. At least the Entune infotainment system is simple to understand. Space is plentiful for passengers in both rows with an abundance of head and legroom. There is the option of a third row, but it would be wise to skip it since it isn’t comfortable for most people to due to the minuscule amount of legroom. The powertrain remains a 4.0L V6 with 270 horsepower and 278 pound-feet of torque, and a five-speed automatic transmission. Most trims will have the choice of either two-wheel or four-wheel drive. The TRD Pro and Trail (the model seen here) only come with four-wheel drive. The power figures may make you believe that the 4Runner has enough grunt for the daily grind, but it falters once you take it out on the road. Around town, the V6 provides a decent amount of grunt. But where the engine falters is trying to make a pass or merging onto a freeway. It seems to make more noise than actual power in these situations. The automatic transmission provides smooth gear changes. But adding an extra gear would not be a bad thing since would drop engine rpm on the expressway and improve overall fuel economy. I got an average of 19 mpg for the week - EPA fuel economy figures stand at 17 City/21 Highway/18 Combined for 4WD models. SUVs have made progress in terms of ride and handling, but you wouldn’t know that if you were driving a Toyota 4Runner. Take for example the ride quality. At low speeds, the 4Runner’s suspension does a good job with smoothing over bumpers. At higher speeds such as driving on a freeway, the ride becomes very bouncy. Going around a corner isn’t a pleasant experience as there is a fair amount of body lean. Steering is on the heavy and makes certain tasks such as pulling into a parking space a bit of a chore. But the 4Runner does redeem itself when it comes to off-road driving. Sadly, we didn’t get the chance to take this 4Runner off-road which is quite a shame because the Trail adds some goodies to help when it comes to going off the beaten path. There is a locking rear differential, Crawl Control which is a low-speed cruise control system to allow the SUV go through a rocky trail, Multi-Terrain Select that alters throttle and traction control settings for various conditions, and the Kinetic Dynamic Suspension System that adjusts the suspension to allow for more wheel travel. The Toyota 4Runner is an old-school SUV wrapped up in modern clothing. It makes no apologies for what it is and that is something I respect. This is a model that should be considered by those who want to go to special place in the woods or out in the desert on a regular basis. If you’re not planning to go off-road on a regular basis, then the 4Runner is a poor choice. Stick with a crossover or something like a Jeep Grand Cherokee.  
      Disclaimer: Toyota Provided the 4Runner, Insurance, and One Tank of Gas
      Year: 2016
      Make: Toyota
      Model: 4Runner
      Trim: Trail Premium
      Engine: 4.0L DOHC Dual VVT-i 24-Valve V6
      Driveline: Six-Speed Automatic, 4WD
      Horsepower @ RPM: 270 @ 5,600
      Torque @ RPM: 278 @ 4,400
      Fuel Economy: City/Highway/Combined - 17/21/18
      Curb Weight: 4,750 lbs
      Location of Manufacture: Tahara, Aichi, Japan
      Base Price: $39,095
      As Tested Price: $40,148 (Includes $900.00 Destination Charge and $750.00 'Keep it Wild' savings)
      Options:
      Remote Engine Start - $499.00
      All Weather Mats/Cargo Tray - $200.00
      Cargo Cover - $155.00
      Cargo Net - $49.00

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